uj500-20170308_5374.jpg
Chotaro Horii is the 6th-generation owner/operator of Horii Shichimeien which was originally Okunoyama Chaen (奥ノ山茶園), one of Uji's Seven Reknown Tea Fields (七名園).
uj501-20170308_5379.jpg
In 15th century, Ashikaga Yoshimitsu and Yoshinaga loved Uji tea so much that they designated seven tea fields as the Seven Reknown Tea Fields. Today only Okunoyama Chaen remains.
uj502-20170308_5349.jpg
Only part of the original Okunoyama Chaen remains as a tea field. The original Okunoyama tea field was larger. Notice the shade.
uj503-20170308_5364.jpg
uj504-20170308_5357.jpg
uj505-20170308_5400.jpg
Near their tea farm, Horii Shichimeien also has a tea shop selling some of Japan's finest tea.
uj506-20170308_5381.jpg
uj507-20170308_5402.jpg
Some of the finest Uji matcha powder at Horii Shichimeien.
uj508-20170308_5401.jpg
Some of the finest Uji matcha powder at Horii Shichimeien.
uj509-20170308_5394.jpg
Behind Horii Shichimeien's tea shop is a small tea house for tea ceremony. Mr. Horii kindly prepares his finest marcha tea for us.
uj510-20170308_5393.jpg
uj511-20170308_5397.jpg
Matcha tea and a confection. The tea was outstanding. It had a malty, matcha taste. Pretty thick. The aftertaste was interesting.
uj512-20170308_5391.jpg
uj513-20170308_5404.jpg
Mrs. Horii prepares a different kind of tea.
uj514-20170308_5406.jpg
We then got to see Horii Shichimeien's matcha tea factory. (Note that this is not open to normal tourists.)
uj515-20170308_5423.jpg
Inside Horii Shichimeien's tea factory.
uj516-20170308_5408.jpg
It was a room full of stone grinders grinding matcha tea leaves into fine matcha power.
uj517-20170308_5409.jpg
Stone grinders grinding matcha (tencha) tea leaves into fine matcha power at Horii Shichimeien's tea factory.
uj518-20170308_5440.jpg
Stone grinders grinding matcha tea leaves into fine matcha power at Horii Shichimeien's tea factory. Watching these grinders was mesmerizing..
uj519-20170308_5439.jpg
Matcha tea leaves to be ground.
uj520-20170308_5416.jpg
Sample grinder. The dried tea leaves are fed through a funnel to the grinding stones.
uj521-20170308_5418.jpg
Grinder face
uj522-20170308_5428.jpg
Small grinder.
uj600-20170309_5730.jpg
Tourists visiting Byodo-in temple can also experience and taste Uji tea at nearby Takumi no Yakata (匠の館).
uj601-20170309_5698.jpg
Entrance to Takumi no Yakata (匠の館).
uj602-20170309_5699.jpg
Takumi no Yakata was where we could make our own tea (with careful instructions).
uj603-20170309_5729.jpg
uj604-20170309_5701.jpg
Inside Takumi no Yakata. Like a workshop or classroom for making tea.
uj605-20170309_5704.jpg
Our tea-making kit. Everything is provided.
uj606-20170309_5706.jpg
Hot water thermos.
uj607-20170309_5708.jpg
Our instructor (on the left).
uj608-20170309_5716.jpg
Our tea-making kit.
uj609-20170309_5719.jpg
First cup of tea.
uj610-20170309_5724.jpg
Another cup.
uj611-20170309_5726.jpg
In the end, we could even eat the used tea leaves which tasted like spinach maybe.
 
35 files on 1 page(s)