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The Sands of Tottori. Every prefecture has something nationally (and sometimes internationally) famous. In the case of Tottori, it's definitely the sand dunes (sakyu in Japanese).It's on the beach facing the Sea of Japan. The dunes were formed by the ocean currents that deposited the sand on the coast for 100,000 years or so. I find that amazing since most of the beaches I know have the ocean currents eat away the sand.
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The Tottori Sand Dunes is in the city of Tottori, a short bus ride from JR Tottori Station.
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This is what I saw when I arrived at the sand dunes. Sand all over this parking lot across the road from the dunes.
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This man told me that this happens only when there are strong winds. I was relieved to hear that it wasn't every day.
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Although the sand dunes are shrinking, there's still lots of sand here.
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The sand is quite solid, not soft like beach sand on Waikiki.
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Wind-blown footprints.
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Tottori Sand Dunes looked like this when I first visited years ago. The shape does not seem to change.
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Camel rides even. Seem to be a good business, but they don't go very far.
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The San'in coast has lots of little islands and rocks. This is Japan's No. 1 sand dunes for tourists. Quite white and convenient to get here.
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This sandy hill is named "The Horse's Back" because it's similar in shape. It's the most touristy part of the sand dunes.
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When you see the Tottori Sand Dunes, you'll see tiny humans way out in the distance. They look to be far, far away, but the distance is surprisingly close.Maybe only a 10- or 15-min. walk away. Depending on whether you climb the dunes or not.
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Looks steep.
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The sand dunes can be pretty steep, but not dangerous. They have downhill sand boarding.
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Tottori Sand Dunes are very photogenic, and many photographers have used it for artistic shoots.
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From the top of the dune.
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The steepest part looks to be around 40˚. There are more gradual slopes that you can easily go up and reach the top.
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Kids love to climb the slopes.
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Over many years, strong winds blew the ocean sand onto the beach to form the Tottori Sand dunes.
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The first time I visited Tottori was in summer so the sand and sun were too hot to walk across to the ocean. No problem in winter so I finally got to see the ocean beyond the dunes.
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Very dramatic ocean at Tottori Sand Dunes.
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Bus stop to go back to Tottori Station.
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Entrance to Tottori Sand Dunes
   
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