Image search results - "koga"
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Cherry tree forest near the Nishi-guchi (west) gate.
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The outdoor architectural museum is within Koganei Park in Koganei, Tokyo. This is the Visitors Center.
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Koganei Park sakura
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Going to visitors center
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Huge trees shower you with cherry blossoms.
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Visitors Center entrance courtyard
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Low branches are common
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Jisho-in Mausoleum
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Mansion of Mitsui Hachiroemon, one of the museum's must-see buildingsFounder of the Mitsui zaibatsu.
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Inside Mitsui Hachiroemon mansion
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Tokiwadai Photo Studio, 1937Unfortunately, it was closed for renovations. It has a large frosted glass which brought in daylight for studio lighting.
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Farmer's house
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Farmer's house
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Inside farmer's house
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Inside farmer's house
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Another farmer's house
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Inside another farmer's house
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Path to other areas of the huge park.
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Yamanote-dori Road
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Tall one
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Takahashi Korekiyo mansion
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Another cherry tree forest near the center of the park.
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Orge's shack
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Reaching low
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Shitamachi main street
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Visitor's center entrance to the outdoor architectural museum.
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Takei Sanshodo stationary shop
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Cherry blossom promenade
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Takei Sanshodo stationary shop
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On the left is a soy sauce and miso shop. On the right is a public bath.
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Soy sauce shop
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Low-rider cherries
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Soy sauce shop
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Typical Somei-Yoshino cluster of cherry blossoms
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Tavern
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Cherry blossom curtain
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Sento public bath with a temple architectureNamed Kodara-yu.
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This was a weekday.
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Entrance to sento public bath. Men on left and women on right.
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Beautiful day
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Fee collector booth at entrance.
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Changing room
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Tree branches sprawled all over the blue sky.
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Bath entrance
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Cherry blossom veil
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Bathing area
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It says, "Don't open the faucet. Water might flow."
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Bath tub
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Cherry blossom ceiling
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Men's bath
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Cherry blossom roof
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Buckets
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Cherry blossom tent
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Kami-shibai (Storytelling with large paper cards)Popular before the days of television.
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Kami-shibaiSlot to change the story cards.
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Bicycles and cherries
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Old streetcar
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In front of entrance to visitors center
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Inside streetcar
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Old bus
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Fireman's watch tower
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Police box at Manseibashi in Tokyo
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Cherry blossom shade
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Plum blossom trees (withered)
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Nishikawa Villa
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The Three Treasures (in the 1960s): 1. Washing machine with manual wringer
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Red cherries called kanhi-zakura カンヒザクラ
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2. Refrigerator
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Red drooping cherries called kanhi-zakura カンヒザクラSimilar to a rose.
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3. TV set
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Red drooping cherries called kanhi-zakura カンヒザクラSimilar to a rose.
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Kōgan-ji Temple (高岩寺)
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Gate to Koganji temple, a famous spot along the shopping street.
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Koganji temple. The temple's popular name is "Togenuki Jizo-son." It sells magic paper called osugata which supposed to remove a thorn or splinter from your skin. Affix it to the thorn and it will be extracted. とげぬき地蔵尊
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Togenuki means thorn-extracting. Koganji temple incense burner
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Koganji temple Hondo hall. This is a Zen temple belonging to the Soto-shu school. The temple was founded in 1596 and moved to Sugamo in 1891.
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Inside Koganji temple Hondo. The temple houses the Togenuki Jizo statue which is not visible to the public.
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Grounds of Koganji temple as seen from the Hondo hall.
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People line up to wash the famous Kannon statue. The line gets longer on weekends.
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People in line for the Arai (Washable) Kannon statue. Anybody can line up and scrub the statue. No charge.
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Arai Kannon statue. Wash the part of the body to cure the corresponding part of your own body. 洗い観音
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They used to have a tawashi brush to wash the statue, but that wore out the statue. So the replacement statue is now washed/rubbed with a towel instead.
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Jizo statue
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Jizo statue
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People relax in front of the temple.
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The 37th Koganei Awa Odori dance festival was held on July 25-26, 2015 from 6 pm to 9 pm in Koganei, Tokyo. A total of 43 dance troupes (2,800 performers) appeared during the two-day festival. Many are based in Koganei.
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Misashi-Koganei Station is crowded on Awa Odori evenings.
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Starting point of the dancers near the train station. 小金井街道北口
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Awa Odori dance troupes are called "ren."
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Aoi Shin-ren
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Also watch my YouTube video of Koganei Awa Odori.
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Also watch my YouTube video of Koganei Awa Odori.
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Aoi Shin-ren
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Aoi Shin-ren
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Aoi Shin-ren
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Aoi Shin-ren
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Sakura-ren is from Koganei
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Sakura-ren
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Sakura-ren at Koganei Awa Odori in July
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Sakura-ren
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Sakura-ren
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Sakura-ren
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Sakura-ren
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Seibu Kodomo-kai-ren
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Seibu Kodomo-kai-ren
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Seibu Kodomo-kai-ren
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Koganei Awa Odori, Tokyo
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Kurenai-ren
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Kurenai-ren
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Koganei Awa Odori
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Koganei Awa Odori, Tokyo
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Sakura-ren
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Sakura-ren
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The last dance in front of the station.
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Koka Ninja House (Koka-ryu Ninjutsu Yashiki) is the former residence of Mochizuki Izumonokami, the leading Koga ninja family of the 53 Koka ninja families. 望月出雲守 MAPThe house is in its original location in the Koka area of Shiga Prefecture.
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The Ninja House, built in 1703, is owned and maintained by a local medicine company having ninja roots. Many Koka ninja were makers of medicine as a front for their clandestine activities. This background also made them expert at making gunpowder.Not a National Historic Site, but it should be.
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The Koka Ninja House is located 2 km from JR Konan Station on the JR Kusatsu Line. There are no buses going to the Ninja House. The house is open every day 9 am - 5 pm. Closed Dec. 27-Jan. 1. Admission is 600 yen for adults. 望月出雲守
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The first room you see in the house is the living room. You can sit and have free "ninja tea" while waiting for a guided tour of the house. Along with the geisha, the ninja is one of the most recognized but misunderstood things about Japan.
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The upper walls have explanations about the Koka ninja and Mochizuki ninja family. "Koka" is the correct pronunciation, but the kanji can also be pronounced "Koga" which has become more common.
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Revolving door (opened). The floor also has a trap door (see next photo) where you can go down and escape through a tunnel leading to a well in the garden outside.
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Trap door on the floor opened.
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Inside the trap door is a hole and tunnel leading to a well in the garden outside. Hence the water.
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Entrance to another room on the first floor. Although the Koga ninja and Iga ninja (in Mie Prefecture) were the most famous, there were actually numerous ninja groups in many other parts of Japan as well. They were most active during wars.
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This room has display cases showing various ninja weapons, tools, and costumes. The ceiling is also quite low, designed to impede the wielding of samurai swords.
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The left sliding wooden door is very heavy, about 50 kg, making it difficult to open. This buys more time for the ninja to escape.
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Closet with a trap door on the floor.
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Ladder going up to the attic.
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Ladder going to the 2nd floor. There's also a trap door on the floor below the ladder where the ninja could hide. Notice the rope. The ninja hiding under the floor would tug the rope connected to the 2nd floor.
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That rope goes to the second floor (see next photo).
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The rope is connected to a noise maker on the 2nd floor here. The intruder would then think that the ninja is on the 2nd floor and go up the ladder in pursuit. When the intruder is on the 2nd floor, the ninja below the trap door would remove the ladder.
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The 2nd floor, between the first floor and ceiling, has a very low height which can entrap an intruder going upstairs.
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The wooden railing on the right is slimmer than the left one. It means it is removable, allowing the ninja to escape from the 2nd floor.
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Ceiling of Ninja House. Directly below the thatched roof.
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Ceiling of Ninja House.
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Stairs to go back down to the 1st floor. There's a rotating door. Ninja worked behind the scenes and were very secretive. They hardly told others about their activites nor left written records. Sometimes they worked as spies or mole.
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The veranda is another escape route after opening trick windows from the inside. Ninja avoided direct combat and preferred to defend themselves and escape from enemies. Assassination was only a minor part of their activities.
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Small revolving door connected to a closet. The Koka ninja's main activity was gathering information. As they traveled and sold medicines, they always talked to people and their customers. They tried to find out how many guns the enemy had, etc.
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Medicine ad sign reading Ninjutsu-gan. For belly aches. Although the ninja's medicine-making remains today, the art of ninjutsu is ironically no longer practiced in Koka. It is not a martial art like karate and judo.
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For 500 yen, you can rent a ninja costume of various colors.
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Little ninja at target practice.
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The Koka Ninja House also has a Shuriken Dojo. Pay 200 yen for five shuriken throwing stars (300 yen for 10) and try hitting the bull's eye.
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Real ninja obviously did not wear a pink costume, but in the manga/anime world, pink looks cute.
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Trying my shuriken skills. You throw it with an overhand throw (like a baseball) and not like a frisbee. Also see my YouTube video here.
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Three out of five of my shuriken at least stuck on the board. But all missed the target which is quite low. Probably geared for kids.
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Real ninja shuriken throwing star knives on display. Made of steel, they come in many different shapes.
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A flaming star
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Maki-bishi spikes thrown on the ground to poke your feet. These are made from dried water chestnuts (aquatic plant found in marshes). One of the four spikes will point upward.
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Maki-bishi made of steel. Used for escape when they encountered an enemy. Many of the ninja's weapons were designed to buy time for the ninja to escape.
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Dart-shaped shuriken. Shuriken were not only star-shaped. These were either thrown straight-on, or thrown while the point rotated 180 degrees turning toward the target. It was difficult to throw, and much practice was required..
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Ninja sword, very short.
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Gunpowder case
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Small gun concealed as a sword.
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Bullets with various gauges.
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The famed Bansenshukai Ninja Bible detailing ninja tools and techniques. This is a replica.
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One room's upper walls display a chronological history of the Koga ninja.
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Ninja tools
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Display case showing ninja costumes. Real ninja mainly wore one of seven disguises instead of the stereotypical black costume. They could be dressed as a priest, merchant, jester, etc.
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Contrary to popular belief, ninja cannot walk on water. "Mizugumo" means water spider. To move across water, they used a wooden floating ring shown here, and sat in the middle.
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They wore wooden geta clogs with flippers which helped them propel themselves underwater. The wooden floating ring is collapsible and quite light. Almost like balsa.
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A sketch shows how they were "water spiders." They were largely submerged in the water, with the wooden ring also submerged, but buoyant enough for them to float across while kicking through the water with the flipper clogs.
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Straw ninja hat with a deep brim to hide their face. Dressing like a priest, merchant, etc., would arouse the least suspicion while they traveled.
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Straw sandals with metal claws for traction.
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Blow tube and blow darts.
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