JAPAN PHOTOS by Philbert Ono

*Be sure to wear a mask when in crowds.

Image search results - "pier"
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June 9, 2007. Hula dancers rush to Pukari Sanbashi Pier where the Hokule'a canoe is to dock. ぷかりさん橋
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A crowd of a few hundred on hand to greet Hokule'a's arrival.
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People crowd the waterfront near Pukari Sanbashi Pier.
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People crowd the waterfront near Pukari Sanbashi Pier.
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Hokule'a already in sight well before 11 am when it was scheduled to dock.
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Hokule'a and escort ship Kama Hele. What makes this canoe so special and famous is that it was used to sail from Hawaii to Tahiti (and many other places) without any modern navigational instruments.
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They only referred to the sun, moon, the stars, and ocean waves to navigate through the vast Pacific Ocean or Polynesia. This is called celestial navigation. Extremely few people can do this, and the Hawaiians are learning this skill of long-ago.
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They wanted to prove that the original native Hawaiians were able to sail between Tahiti to Hawaii on purpose, and that they did not land on Hawaii by accident.
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Hokule'a and Yokohama Bay Bridge in the background.
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One sail unraveled.
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Nearing Pukari Sanbashi Pier. The question was, which side of the pier would it dock? (Was going the other side so I rushed over to the other side.)
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Hokule'a nears the dock.
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A rope is thrown to the dock from Hokule'a.
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Hokule'a arrives right on schedule at 11 am on June 9, 2007. Yokohama is its last stop.
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Hula dancers
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Conch shell blowers signal the canoe's arrival.
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Pulling Hawaii's most famous canoe to dock.
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Under overcast skies, Hokule'a docks.
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Escort ship (powered by a Yanmar engine) Kama Hele also docks soon afterward.
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Koinobori carp streamers adorn Hokule'a. A great Japanese touch.
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Escort ship Kama Hele flying the Japanese, Hawaiian, and Yanmar flags at Yokohama.
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Welcome banner from Yanmar
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Crowd on the waterfront near the pier.
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Hokule'a crew members
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The Royal Order of Kamehameha I take part in arrival ceremonies. 入港式
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Hokule'a arrival ceremonies
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Captain Bruce Blankenfeld places a lei on the bow.
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Hula dancers
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Hula dancers take part in arrival ceremonies.
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Hokule'a crew dance on the canoe.
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Royal Order of Kamehameha I
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Royal Order of Kamehameha I wear red and gold capes.
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Royal Order of Kamehameha I leave the pier.
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Conch shell blower
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Crew members hug each other.
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Former Yokozuna Akebono (blue shirt) and his family were also on the pier. (Wife and daughter in orange.)
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Nainoa Thompson and other crew members get off the boat. Nainoa was on board, but was not part of the crew who brought the canoe to Yokohama.
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Miss Yokohama also took part in the arrival ceremonies.
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Arrival ceremony ends and people start to leave the pier.
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Future Hokule'a Captain, Ka'iu Murphy.
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All the crew members met applause and handshakes.
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All the crew members were very friendly to all. This is Captain/Navigator Chadd Paishon.
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Kimo
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Captain Blankenfeld who piloted the canoe to Yokohama.
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Finally, Nainoa Thompson makes his way from the pier and into the crowd.
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Nainoa Thompson
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Nainoa shook every single hand.
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He shook hands with EVERYBODY and ANYBODY.
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The crowd was thrilled to be so close to this man full of aloha.
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People line up to shake Nainoa's hand or get his autograph or take his picture.
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Nainoa has a habit of crouching on his knees so he can use his knee as a backing to sign autographs.
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"Here you go!"
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Plus a handshake for this little guy...
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He never refused to sign an autograph.
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He never refused to shake a hand.
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This woman put a small necklace on him.
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I have never seen anyone who shook everybody's hand, signed autographs for everyone, and posed for all photographers. ナイノア・トンプソン
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Finally at the end, a little girl's artwork on a sheet of cloth catches his eye.
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He poses with the girl.
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He was so touched and impressed that he gave her a hug.
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He actually wanted her to keep her magnificant work of art, but she wanted him to have it.
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The little girl was in awe and speechless.
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He accepts the little girl's impressive gift.
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He folds the sheet neatly and carries it with him to a press conference which he was late in attending. An ideal Goodwill Ambassador.
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June 10, 2007. A formal welcoming ceremony was held the next day on an outdoor terrace near the pier. Unfortunately, it was a rainy day and attendance was much smaller than the day before. 入港歓迎セレモニー
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Captain Blankenfeld receives a gift.
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The ceremony included hula chanting and dancing.
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A local taiko troupe give a spectacular performance. 学校法人国際学園 星槎国際高等学校
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In return, the crew performs the haka dance.
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A small crowd watch the welcome ceremony. パシフィコ横浜国立大ホール前テラス
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Hula dancers watch the ceremony
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Nainoa Thompson gives a thank you speech with Hokule'a's captains.
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Nainoa Thompson gave a touching speech about Japan-Hawaii friendship, their rediscovery of Japan ("Japan is not just Tokyo"), and Hokule'a's mission.
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Nainoa introduces the rest of the crew and future Hokule'a captains being groomed to take over.
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Hokule'a crew on stage.
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Hokule'a at Yokohama
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Hokule'a and Kama Hele in Yokohama, June 10, 2007
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Hokule'a, Kama Hele, and Yokohama Bay Bridge. Also see photos of the canoe tour.
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Pukari Sanbashi Pier. Hokule'a can be seen on the left. On the right is another pier for sightseeing boats. The building in the middle is a resthouse.
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Ekimae Sambashi Pier at Toyako Onsen Spa. The lake cruise fare is 1,320 yen for adults and 660 yen for kids. (Slightly more expensive during Nov.-April.) 駅前桟橋
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Espoir is the name of this lake cruise boat shaped like a medieval European castle. Can't get more gimmicky than that.
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Another cruise boat. The cruise boats leave every 30 min. from 8 am to 4:30 pm during April-Oct. During Nov.-April, it operates every hour from 9 am to 4 pm.
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Pier
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The 7th Yokohama Hawai'i Festival was held during July 25-27, 2008 at the huge Osambashi Pier next to Yamashita Park. Way to Osambashi. 大さん橋
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Entrance to Osambashi Pier in Yokohama. This is a terminal building and dock for large passenger ships. When there are no ships, the facility can be rented for various events.
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The multi-level Osambashi Pier building is huge and goes beyond what your eye can see. The air-conditioning was quite high, making all of us sweat.
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First you see this small Welcome stage where keiki hula and other performances were held.
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The festival featured a few celebrities from Hawaii such as Amy Hanaiali'i who was signing autographs on her new CD.
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Food stalls serving Hawaiian-like food.
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Even shave ice.
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This is what it looks like outside the Osambashi Pier. In the distance is Yamashita Park. It was here where King David Kalakaua arrived in Japan during his world tour in 1881. This fact serves as the basis for the existence of this festival.
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Another stage was in the C.I.Q Plaza. Standing room only.
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C.I.Q Plaza stage where numerous hula troupes, etc., performed all day long.
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Bruce Shimabukuro (Jake's brother) gives a ukulele workshop.
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This huge Osambashi Hall was filled with stalls selling mainly Hawaiian clothing.
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At one end was the Hall Stage where more people entertained.
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Hall Stage
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Clothing stall
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Clothing shops and the outdoor stage can be seen in the distance.
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Hula dancers wait perform on the outdoor stage.
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On the roof of the Osambashi Pier, is an outdoor plaza and yet another stage. Yokohama Hawai'i Festival
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The outdoor stage was the best and roomiest facility for sitting down and watching the entertainment.
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More hula troupes perform. The festival also had other venues at Nippon Maru, Landmark Plaza, and Queen's Square.
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Ku'ulei Mamo from Hawaii also performed with her ukulele.
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Ku'ulei Mamo
   
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