Image search results - "paper"
036-IMG_6420.jpg
Minami Kannon-yama float
049-IMG_4471.jpg
Paper lanterns 奥殿
480news20171125-ChunichiShimbun001s.jpg
Chunichi Shimbun article (Nov. 26, 2017) about Kyoto University's celebration of the 100th anniversary of Biwako Shuko no Uta including the unveiling of the new song monument on campus.
481news20170417ChunichiShimbun2.jpg
Chunichi Shimbun article (April 17, 2017) about our Lake Biwa Rowing Song mini concert held in Imazu on April 16, 2017. See videos of this event here: https://youtu.be/9G94IppUiiE
https://youtu.be/PjnY67sIcqE
482news20170417mainichiShimbun2.jpg
Mainichi Shimbun article (April 17, 2017) about our Lake Biwa Rowing Song mini concert held in Imazu on April 16, 2017.
483news20170417AsahiShimbun2.jpg
Asahi Shimbun article (April 17, 2017) about our Lake Biwa Rowing Song mini concert held in Imazu on April 16, 2017.
484news20170417SankeiShimbun2.jpg
Sankei Shimbun article (April 17, 2017) about our Lake Biwa Rowing Song mini concert held in Imazu on April 16, 2017.
485news20170417YomiuriShimbun2.jpg
Yomiuri Shimbun article (April 17, 2017) about our Lake Biwa Rowing Song mini concert held in Imazu on April 16, 2017.
486news20170412MainichiShimbun2.jpg
Mainichi Shimbun article (April 12, 2017) announcing our upcoming Lake Biwa Rowing Song mini concert to be held in Imazu on April 16, 2017.
487news20150527KyotoShimbun.jpg
Kyoto Shimbun article mentioning the song's roots in the UK, May 27, 2015
488news20070617.jpg
"Lake Biwa Rowing Song CD on sale," June 17, 2007, Asahi Shimbun, Shiga Edition.
489news20070617kyoto.jpg
"Lake Biwa Rowing Song sung during Lake Biwa Cruise," June 17, 2007, Kyoto Shimbun, Shiga Edition.
490news20070605chu.jpg
"Lake Biwa Rowing Song photo exhibition at Imazu," June 5, 2007, Chunichi Shimbun, Biwako Edition
491news20070515.jpg
"Biwako Shuko no Uta in English, Beloved Song Translated" at Yokaichi Public Library, May 15, 2007, Shiga Hochi Shimbun 滋賀報知新聞
491news20070526.png
"Lake Biwa Rowing Song photo exhibition at Yokaichi Public Library," (Letter to the Editor), May 26, 2007, Kyoto Shimbun.Written by Masahiro Beniya.
492news20070226chu.jpg
"Japanese speech contest by foreigners in Shiga," Feb. 26, 2007, Chunichi Shimbun, Chunichi-Shiga pageWon by Jamie Thompson for her speech about Lake Biwa Rowing Song.
493news20070226kyoto.jpg
"13 contestants in Japanese speech contest by foreigners in Shiga," Feb. 26, 2007, Kyoto Shimbun, Shiga News
494news20070226mai.jpg
"Japanese speech contest by foreigners in Shiga, Ms. Thompson wins," Feb. 26, 2007, Mainichi Shimbun, Shiga Edition
496news20060612.jpg
"Lake Biwa Rowing Song photo exhibition in Takashima," June 12, 2006, Chunichi Shimbun, Chunichi-Shiga page. (The man in the picture is not Philbert.)
497news20060604.jpg
"Lake Biwa Rowing Song completed in English and performed in public," June 4, 2006, Mainichi Shimbun, Shiga News
498news20060604yo.jpg
"Lake Biwa Rowing Song performed in public in Imazu, the song's birthplace," June 4, 2006, Yomiuri Shimbun, Shiga News
499news20060603.jpg
"Lake Biwa Rowing Song completed in English by an American," June 3, 2006, Asahi Shimbun, Shiga News
500news20051211.jpg
"Let's make an English version of Biwako Shuko no Uta," Dec. 11, 2005, Asahi Shimbun, Shiga News
as010-IMG_1811.jpg
Sensoji temple's Kaminarimon Gate. There's a large road in front and also a large paved area where festivals are held. 雷門
as011-IMG_1810.jpg
Symbol of Tokyo: Kaminari-mon Gate with a giant red paper lantern. Pass through this gate to reach Asakusa Kannon Temple. 雷門
as012-IMG_1791.jpg
One of Tokyo's most photographed buildings: Kaminari-mon Gate with a giant red paper lantern.
as013-IMG_1798.jpg
Giant red paper lantern with the kanji characters "Kaminari Mon." The gate was reconstructed in 1960. The previous one was lost in a fire in 1865.
as014-IMG_1815.jpg
Under the lantern on the gold cap, there's "Matsushita Denki" (Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. or Panasonic). The current Kaminarimon Gate and giant lantern were rebuilt in 1960 as a donation by Konosuke Matsushita.
as015-IMG_1812.jpg
The lantern is covered with a protective net. The lantern can be collapsed like an accordion to allow tall objects (such as a mikoshi portable shrine during the Sanja Matsuri festival) to pass under the gate. It is also collapsed during typhoons.
as015c-P1040681.jpg
The famous Kaminarimon lantern was replaced with a new one in Nov. 2013. This is the back.
as015d-P1040685.jpg
The bottom of the new Kaminarimon lantern has this nice artwork.
as016-IMG_0098.jpg
The temple is also called Kinryuzan, meaning Golden Dragon. 金龍山
as017-101_0192.jpg
An unusual time when the giant lantern was removed for repairs. Asakusa looks very strange, almost naked, without the giant lantern.
as047-IMG_1895.jpg
Hozomon Gate
as048-IMG_1898.jpg
Hozomon Gate's giant paper lantern.
as078-IMG_0597.jpg
Hondo worship hall 本堂
as079-IMG_0599.jpg
Steps going up to the Hondo main worship hall.
as080-IMG_1920.jpg
as081-IMG_1922.jpg
Going to worship.
as082-97140-22NOV3.jpg
as083-IMG_1958.jpg
as084-97140-23.jpg
as085-IMG_1955.jpg
View from Hondo worship hall
as086-933-23.jpg
Crowd during New Year's
kc200-20181022-0320.jpg
Kurotani is the name of the village (now part of Ayabe city) where they make Kurotani washi paper. This is the entrance to the small village in a valley.Kurotani Village started making washi about 800 years ago when 16 warriors of the Heike Clan defeated by the Minamoto Clan in Kyoto (Genpei War 1180–1185) fled and hid here to avoid capture. They and the local farmers made a living in summer by growing rice, but since there was nothing to do in winter, they thought of making washi paper. Washi can only be made in winter since it requires cold water.
kc201-20181022-0322.jpg
Kurotani Washi-no-Sato Japanese papermaking village in Ayabe, Kyoto.Once upon a time, there were a number of washi paper makers in northern Kyoto like Tango washi and Tanba washi, but now there's only one traditional maker that has survived called Kurotani washi. They work here in the small Kurotani Valley.
kc202-20181022-0328.jpg
Kurotani village was blessed with this clean Kurotani River, essential for papermaking. Kurotani washi is quite famous now, even overseas.
kc203-20181022-0324.jpg
Kurotani village has this Kurotani Washi Kaikan gift shop (黒谷和紙会館). Kurotani is not touristy because it's not convenient to get here.
kc203c-20181022-0365.jpg
Inside Kurotani Washi Kaikan gift shop.
kc206-20181022-0326.jpg
kc207-20181022-0332.jpg
kc207c-KurotaniKozo.jpg
Kurotani washi mainly uses kozo or mitsumata mulberry plants as the raw material. This is our Kurotani washi guide showing us the kozo plants that can grow to three meters high.They are harvested in autumn by cutting the trunks or branches. They grow kozo mulberry near Ayabe Station. Kozo is called "kago" in Kurotani.
kc207f-20181022-0421.jpg
To make the paper fibers for washi, there are many laborious steps. After the kozo branches are cut in even lengths, they are stuffed in a barrel (koshiki) like this and placed over a boiling and steaming iron pot for three to four hours to soften the brown bark.
kc208-20181022-0329.jpg
While the kozo branches are still hot, elderly ladies twist and strip off the brown bark (kuro-kawa 黒皮). The bark is dried, then soaked in river water like here.
kc209-20181022-0341.jpg
While soaking, the kozo bark is also kneaded by human feet to soften it. The water is cold, and it's a traditional job for the grandmas.
kc210-20181022-0346.jpg
We just happened to come across her in the river kneadking the brown bark. How lucky we were.
kc211-20181022-0361.jpg
She's Horie Sayo, 86 years old, been doing it since her teens.
kc212-20181022-0336.jpg
The brown kozo bark is shaved and scraped with a knife by hand to remove the brown bark skin and other blemishes. Then the becomes thin, white strips that are dried in the sun. (shiro-kawa 白皮)
kc213-20181022-0340.jpg
White kozo bark strips drying. These will then be mashed and beaten into fibrous globs. Preparing the kozo fibers from the bark is the most laborious and time-consuming part of washi making.
kc250-20181022-0375.jpg
Also visited Kurotani Washi Kougei No Sato (Kurotani Washi Craft Village 黒谷和紙 工芸の里) a 20-min. car ride away.They were using an old elementary school.
kc251-20181022-0376.jpg
They use the 1st floor for making paper, while the second floor are washi exhibition rooms.
kc252-20181022-0370.jpg
kc253-20181022-0451.jpg
They offer washi papermaking lessons for ¥1,300 including admission.
kc254-20181022-0443.jpg
Entrance hall with origami cranes made of Kurotani washi. It really looks like an old school.
kc255-20181022-0445.jpg
Corridor to rooms.
kc256-20181022-0379.jpg
Washi papermaking room where we tried making Kurotani washi paper (postcards).
kc257-20181022-0383.jpg
A large vat (sukifune) filled with washi fibers floating evenly in the water. The fibers are mixed in with a plant-based adhesive so they don't sink to the bottom and they also cling together to make the paper. A wooden mold (keta 桁) to make eight postcards on the right. Kurotani washi bills itself as Japan's strongest paper. In the 1920s, Kurotani washi was tested for strength and was declared the strongest washi in Japan. I was told Kurotani's kozo has longer fibers than other species so the paper is stronger.
kc258-20181022-0387.jpg
Our instructor first showed us how it was done. He used a mold to make eight washi postcards.
kc259-20181022-0428.jpg
About sugeta.
kc260-20181022-0397.jpg
Dump the postcard mold into the vat and swish it left/right and forward/back evenly.
kc261-20181022-0401.jpg
Takes three years to learn how to make washi paper with a mold. Ten years to become an expert. But we did it in a minute or two... Just dip the mold into the fibrous water, and swish it to the left/right and forward/back.
kc262-KurotaniPostcards.jpg
The postcards looked quite thick out of the mold, but they would get much thinner when dried.
kc263-20181022-0405.jpg
Afterward, we could decorate our postcards with colored ink/fibers.
kc264-20181022-0412.jpg
A few people even embedded leaves.
kc265-20181022_2370a.jpg
They later sent us our postcards. Mine came out okay.
kc267-20181022-0417.jpg
This shows how they typically hang and dry the white strips and bark strips.
kc268-20181022-0418.jpg
kc269-20181022-0419.jpg
kc270-20181022-0425.jpg
Later, it is mashed/beaten in a stone mortar.
kc271-20181022-0426.jpg
Then it goes through a mechanical beater for 10 min. to become a wet, fibrous mass. They also make and add a plant-based adhesive. Here's a good video (in Japanese) showing how they do it (the woman we saw in the river also appears in this video): https://youtu.be/-3ws9DlPVHo?t=425
kc272-20181022-0427.jpg
The vat and mold to make paper.
kc273-20181022-0429.jpg
Kami-suki is what everyone can experience.
kc274-20181022-0430.jpg
The washi shets are dried on wooden boards.
kc275-20181022-0434.jpg
Local public schools have their kids make their diplomas with Kurotani washi.
kc276-20181022-0438.jpg
Second floor in former classrooms are exhibition rooms.
kc277-20181022-0433.jpg
Kurotani washi has long fibers, making it very strong and durable. It has many uses such as umbrellas, shoji paper sliding doors, and packaging.
kc278-20181022-0436.jpg
kc279-20181022-0440.jpg
Kurotani washi can even be used for umbrellas.
kc280-20181022-0441.jpg
kc281-20181022-0448.jpg
Gift shop.
kc282-20181022-0449.jpg
kc283-20181022-0447.jpg
kc284-20181022-0411.jpg
kc285-20181022-0450.jpg
Places in Japan where washi is made.https://kurotaniwashi.kyoto
English: https://kurotaniwashi.kyoto/?page_id=450
km018-20080914_9143.jpg
On one end was this stage and lantern bearers representing all the mikoshi groups.
st180-20090807_2248.jpg
Another crowd favorite was these streamers made of tiny origami paper cranes.
st181-20090807_2249.jpg
This was the 34th Tanabata Decoration of Peace. Aug. 6, the first day of the Sendai Tanabata Matsuri, also happens to be the anniversary of the Hiroshima atomic bombing.
st182-20090807_2246.jpg
It says "No More Hiroshima."
st183-20090807_2251.jpg
Tiny origami paper cranes. Guess how many paper cranes there are? Over 1 million.
st184-20090807_2242.jpg
Peace message.
st185-20090807_2241.jpg
Organizations who made the 1 million+ paper cranes. About 25,000 people from all over Japan from age 5 to 103 made over 1 million paper cranes. That's an average of 40 cranes per person.
st186-20090807_2253.jpg
Bottom of the paper cranes.
st187-20090807_2252.jpg
People were amazed at these cranes. This is one type of streamer you won't see at other Tanabata Festivals in Japan.
st188-20090806_1794.jpg
st189-20090806_1210.jpg
st190-20090807_2434.jpg
Origami paper cranes is actually one type of Tanabata decorations. Many decorations had paper cranes as you can see here.
st191-20090806_1580.jpg
Origami paper cranes.
st192-20090807_2342.jpg
st194-20090807_2343.jpg
st195-20090807_2358.jpg
Regular-size paper cranes.
   
110 files on 1 page(s)