JAPAN PHOTOS by Philbert Ono

*Due to COVID-19, traveling to and within Japan is currently being discouraged.

Image search results - "olympic"
001-NAGANO.jpg
JR Nagano Station festooned with Olympic logos.
001-S50003.jpg
On June 6, 2004, the Athens Olympic Torch Relay came through Tokyo as it has been doing at all cities in the world which had held a Summer Olympics. Starting point: Tokyo Big SightI chased the flame for Athens at several points in Tokyo.
002-S50011.jpg
Dignitaries at the torch relay starting ceremony.
002-TRAIN4.jpg
Welcome sign at Nagano Station
003-988-1FEB12.jpg
Nagano Station, East Exit to Olympic PlazaAt the East Exit of Nagano Station, this bridge, lined with advertising banners, led the way to the Olympic Plaza which featured ten tent pavilions made by official sponsors.
003-S50012.jpg
Nagashima Kazushige substitues for his father, baseball hero Nagashima Shigeo, who was hospitalized.
004-988-4.jpg
To Olympic Plaza
004-S50016.jpg
An Olympic torch attendant stands by to hand over the torch. In his right hand, he holds a small lantern housing a little flame in case the main torch is snuffed out.
005-988-9.jpg
Pavilion by Kirin Brewery.Notice the "wrap" bus passing in front.
005-S50018.jpg
The Greek ambassador to Japan gives the torch to Kazushige.
006-988-13.jpg
Olympic PlazaSnowlets House and Kodak's pavilion behind it.
006-S50021.jpg
007-988-17.jpg
Entrance to Snowlets House at Olympic Plaza.The official store for Olympic souvenirs. There were a lot of ticket scalpers (all foreigners) hanging around the entrance. Inside, there was a ticket counter for events which still had seats.
007-S50025.jpg
008-988-20.jpg
Snowlets HouseIt was packed. This is part of the checkout line. There were four checkout lines and each one was about 30 meters long. The line went pretty fast though. They had all kinds of souvenirs: T-shirts, sweatshirts, flags, postcards, pins, key chains, necklaces, stuffed Snowlets, mugs, and even jewelry. I went on the 6th day of the Games and it still had everything well in stock. But I later heard that the shelves were laid bare well before the Games ended.
008-S50028.jpg
About 11 am: Here we go folks, the first of 136 runners in Tokyo.
009-988-19.jpg
Snowlets House, ticket availability
009-S50030.jpg
010-988-24.jpg
Kodak's Kodak-yellow pavilionOn the day I went in, they introduced Jamaica's bobsled team. They are very popular in Japan, largely due to the comedy movie "Cool Running" which was aired in Japan before the Nagano Games started.
010-S50031.jpg
Kazushige runs on the sidewalk in Odaiba.
011-988-23.jpg
Jamaica's bobsled team in Kodak PavilionThey introduced Jamaica's bobsled team. They are very popular in Japan, largely due to the comedy movie "Cool Running" which was aired in Japan before the Nagano Games started.
011-IMG_3407.jpg
Ginza 4-chome, Mitsukoshi Dept. StoreDespite the rain, all these people showed up just to see the torch relay. No one knew who would pass through here. But since Ginza was a major area of Tokyo, we assumed that it would be someone quite famous.
012-988-27.jpg
012-IMG_3408.jpg
Looking toward Matsuya Dept. Store.
013-988-29.jpg
Kita Nagano StationTo get to Aqua Wing, the ice hockey rink, we had to take a local train from Nagano Station for a short ride to the next stop at Kita Nagano Station. This Kita Nagano Station was a tiny little train station certainly not meant for large crowds. It was unbelievably small. It took some minutes before we could get out of the station which was not much larger than a normal living room. The door was also small, enough for only two people to get out at one time.
013-IMG_3411.jpg
Cheerleaders even...
014-988-31.jpg
Aqua Wing ice hockey rink
014-IMG_3414.jpg
Here they come
015-988-32.jpg
015-IMG_3417.jpg
Police escort
016-988-35.jpg
Aqua Wing
016-IMG_3418.jpg
Motorcycle escort
017-988-36.jpg
017-IMG_3422.jpg
It's singer Hashi Yukio (wow).
018-9810-12.jpg
Aqua Wing ice hockey rinkMost of the women's ice hockey matches were held at a stadium called Aqua Wing which is actually an indoor swimming pool with a sliding roof. It seemed like we were in a huge oil drum cut in half.
018-IMG_3424.jpg
Torch runner and famous singer Hashi Yukio passes through Ginza
019-9810-11.jpg
019-S50035.jpg
Koga Toshihiko (gold medalist in judo) carries the torch to Asakusa, in front of Kaminarimon Gate.
020-9810-10.jpg
020-S50044.jpg
Asakusa-style welcome for the sacred Olympic flame. (Golden Dragon Dance)
021-989-12.jpg
My Japanese and American flagsI tacked the flags onto the glass and proudly displayed them in front of my seat behind the goal. That's what you do when you love both countries. Since I was sitting at rinkside behind the goal, the flags (and my face and camera) could be seen on the TV broadcast.

On the left of the photo, you can see the goal referee who was sitting in a glass box. She wrapped herself in a blanket. As you can expect, the place was not warm like a coffee shop.
021-S50053.jpg
Fireman's acrobatics
022-9810-13.jpg
Cheering section for Yuiko SatomiCollege cheering section for Yuiko Satomi, a defense player for Japan.
022-S50065.jpg
Fireman's acrobatics
023-989-34.jpg
The crowd behind me.
023-IMG_3444.jpg
Koga takes the torch again to light the next torch.
024-989-0FEB12.jpg
Start of game
024-IMG_3447.jpg
Passing on the flame at Asakusa
025-989-2.jpg
The Nippon team huddles.The Nippon team huddle and psych themselves up before the start of the game.
025-IMG_3450.jpg
026-989-8.jpg
026-IMG_3452.jpg
Cheerleaders blocking our view of the torch runner
027-989-10.jpg
027-S50078.jpg
Omotesando with path coned off for the torch runner
028-989-11.jpg
Banging the glassI liked it when the puck slammed into the glass (BOOM!) in front of me. The protective glass, by the way, must have been at least an inch thick.
028-S50069.jpg
029-989-13.jpg
029-S50075.jpg
Torch relay point
030-989-16.jpg
A US player scores and celebrates to the dismay of Japan.
030-S50079.jpg
Bicycle cab
031-989-19.jpg
031-S50083.jpg
Olympic ring sculpture along Omotesando
032-989-21.jpg
A US player scores and celebrates to the dismay of Japan.
033-989-23.jpg
033-S50087.jpg
Yoyogi GymnasiumTorch relay path is coned off.
034-989-24.jpg
A US player scores and celebrates to the dismay of Japan.
034-IMG_3460.jpg
Coming down Omotesando, first are sponsor vehicles
035-989-28.jpg
5-0 on scoreboard during 1st period.In the 1st period, the scoreboard shows 5-0 in favor of the US.
035-IMG_3461.jpg
036-989-29.jpg
036-IMG_3464.jpg
Photographers' truck
037-989-30.jpg
037-IMG_3465.jpg
Torch runner at Omotesando, for Athens 2004 Olympic Torch RelayMiura Yukari, a high school student from Fukushima Pref.

福島工業高等専門学校に通い、部活動はソフトボールという三浦由香里さん。
038-989-31.jpg
Resurfacing the ice during intermission
038-IMG_3470.jpg
Miura Yukari, a high school student from Fukushima Pref.Miura Yukari, a high school student from Fukushima Pref.

福島工業高等専門学校に通い、部活動はソフトボールという三浦由香里さん。
039-989-33.jpg
Resurfacing the ice during intermission
039-IMG_3474.jpg
Jacket
040-989-35.jpg
041-989-37.jpg
041-IMG_3481.jpg
Stage at Tokyo City Hall
042-9810-0FEB12.jpg
042-IMG_3487.jpg
The crowd waits to see who the final torch runner is.
043-9810-1.jpg
043-IMG_3494.jpg
It's Fukuhara Ai, table tennis player.
044-9810-21.jpg
Nagano Winter Olympics women's ice hockey match.
044-IMG_3503.jpg
Ai-chan and Tokyo governor Ishihara Shintaro hold the torch together.
045-9810-25.jpg
045-IMG_3504.jpg
046-9810-28.jpg
046-IMG_3506.jpg
Ai-chan and Tokyo governor Ishihara Shintaro light the cauldron.
047-9810-33.jpg
047-IMG_3515.jpg
The governor speaks.
048-9810-36.jpg
Frenzy in front of Japan's goal.
048-IMG_3519.jpg
049-9811-3.jpg
049-IMG_3524.jpg
Ai-chan speaks.The frustrating thing about the torch relay was that they did not say which runner would be running where. A list of runners was made public, but there was no information about where they would run.
050-9811-8.jpg
Face to face. Japan's goal keeper was busy, busy, busy.
051-9811-9.jpg
Japan's goalie takes a break at Nagano Winter Olympics women's ice hockey match.Her helmet is dotted with Print Club photo stickers.
052-9811-10.jpg
Nagano Winter Olympics women's ice hockey match.
053-9811-12.jpg
054-9811-15.jpg
055-9811-19.jpg
Japan team mates try to comfort the goal keeper right after the US scores.
056-9811-20.jpg
057-9811-22.jpg
Game ends with USA scoring 10 goals and Japan zero.The final score was 10-0. Japan went on to lose all five of their matches and the US team went undefeated for the gold medal. The US and Canadian men's hockey teams were not the only ones who were put to shame at Nagano.

Japan's women's ice hockey team must feel pretty rotten about their pitiful playing on their home turf.
058-9811-23.jpg
Total winners beat the total losers...The U.S. team went on undefeated to win the first Olympic gold medal in women's ice hockey. Japan lost all five of its matches (they scored a total of 2 goals) putting them in last place among the six women's hockey teams.
059-9811-30.jpg
Olympics auction hosted by Emi Watanabe (left), a former Olympic figure skater.
060-NAGANO3.jpg
Kids gathered at Nagano Station.
061-BUS4.jpg
IBM billboard busesThe decals covering the window portion of the decals have little holes in them and from the inside of the bus, the decals are transparent. IBM's Olympic pins and jacket were also based on these bus decal designs.
062-BUS2.jpg
More billboard busesCoca-cola adorned some of the local city buses in Nagano.
063-STREET1.jpg
The road from Nagano Station to Zenkoji Temple.Lots of Olympics advertising.
064-STREET2.jpg
Local busThis was not a "wrap" bus, but it still had a Kirin ad (made of cloth) on the front.
065-STREET4.jpg
Souvenir shop"Japanese dress Kimono and so on." Awkward or mistaken English is nothing new in Japan. They should've used a Japanese-flag motif instead.
066-9811-35.jpg
Pin sellerThis American woman was selling pins in Nagano at her seventh Olympics. Olympic pins proved to be very popular among the Japanese.

Apparently there are pin sellers who travel to all the Olympics and major sports events making a living as a pin vendor.
067-PINS.jpg
IBM pins (my collection)The IBM pins were being sold for 1,000 yen each. Some people were selling them for up to 2,000 yen.
068-PINS1.jpg
"Official No. 1 Pin Club" ShopShop selling Olympic pins. Prices ranged from 500 yen to 4,000 yen.
069-STREET3.jpg
Fruit gelato standFruit gelato storefront with national flags and "Welcome to Nagano" signs.
070-COP.jpg
PolicemanPoliceman in special uniform designed just for the Nagano Games. The uniform supposed to make them look more friendly.
071-9810-8.jpg
Recycle bins by Coca-cola
072-YAESU5.jpg
Tokyo Station Olympics souvenir shopThis little space (operated by official sponsor Mizuno) in the Yaesu underground mall at Tokyo Station used to have shelves full of Olympic souvenirs. On the day before the Olympics, I saw that they were selling towels, T-shirts, sweatshirts, jackets, mugs, postcards, Snowlets, key chains, and other things. I visited this place again on the last day of the Olympics (when I took this photo) and found a sign saying that they had sold out of Olympics souvenirs. According to the clerk, most were sold out about a week before.They only had a single rack selling expensive framed Olympic prints. The story was the same for the Snowlets House in Nagano and the Tokyo Branch at Mitsukoshi Dept. Store in Nihonbashi. I'm glad I bought my souvenirs early on.
073-SOUV-PROGRAM.jpg
English programme (1,800 yen)
074-SOLET.jpg
Palm-size stuffed Snowlet (official mascot)
075-SOKEY.jpg
Key chain (1,000 yen)
076-SOUV-POSTCARDS.jpg
Postcard set (400 yen)
077-CANS.jpg
Olympics logo on official drinksBesides Coke, Coca-Cola also makes Aquarius (sports drink) and Georgia canned coffee. The Olympics logo and "Nagano 1998" figure prominently on the limited-edition cans. On the Aquarius can, notice the image of a speed skater. On the back of the Georgia coffee can, see the image of the torch relay runner. Georgia coffee was prominently advertised during the nationwide Olympic torch relay to Nagano.
078-FILM.jpg
Olympics logo on official film (not FujiFilm)Kodak was the official Olympics film in a country where 70 percent of the film market belongs to Fuji Film. It must have been sweet revenge for Kodak because Fuji Film was the official film at the Los Angeles Olympics in 1984. Kodak has been the official film sponsor for all Olympic Games since then. It will also be the official film for the Sydney Games in the year 2000.
079-MISO.jpg
Even official Olympics miso pasteWould you believe the official miso? Hanamaruki Foods of Nagano was an official supplier for the Nagano Winter Games. Miso soup must have been a staple item for breakfast (and dinner) at the Olympic Village. I found this at my local supermarket.
080-TOKYO2.jpg
Amway at Tokyo StationAmway shows the way to the Nagano Shinkansen platform for people getting off the Narita Express train which comes from Narita Airport.
081-TOKYO1.jpg
Tokyo Station
082-YAESU2.jpg
Tokyo Station: Official postersThese were painted by Koji Kinutani and plastered everywhere in Tokyo Station. These were being sold to the public for about Y5,000.
083-YAESU1.jpg
Yaesu underground mall: Speed skater outfits made by MizunoMizuno, an official sponsor, set up a nice Olympics exhibition in the Yaesu underground mall at Tokyo Station. There was a nice photo exhibit of past and current Winter Games and a souvenir shop as well. These three photos show part of Mizuno's exhibition.

A few speed skater outfits made by Mizuno. You may recognize the suits for China, Japan, and the USA.
084-YAESU3.jpg
A four-man bobsled.
085-YAESU6.jpg
An elderly couple are among a crowd of people who watched the men's hockey finals on the TV set.
086-TRAIN0.jpg
Nagano ShinkansenThe Nagano shinkansen has a duckbill snout.
087-TRAIN1.jpg
Seat backs and ad stickersThe train's seat backs had advertising stickers. When the Nagano Shinkansen reaches a terminal station (Tokyo and Nagano), the seats can turn around by itself? One thing less to do by the train's cleaning ladies.
088-TRAIN2.jpg
Ad sticker on tray table
089-TRAIN3.jpg
During the Olympics, the morning trains from Tokyo were always crowded. However, the last trains from Nagano to Tokyo were almost empty.
200408.jpg
Aug. 2004 - Flame for AthensCollage of photos I took on June 6, 2004 when the Olympic Torch Relay came through Tokyo.

In the middle is table tennis prodigy Ai Fukuhara speaking after she anchored the torch relay and lit the cauldron you see at Tokyo City Hall.

On the right is another runner who carried the torch across the Olympic Bridge in front of the Olympic Swimming Pool in Harajuku. Pictured in the background is a large Olympic sculpture at a shopping complex in Harajuku.

Japan brought home an unprecedented haul of 37 Olympic medals (16 gold, 9 silver, & 12 bronze). The 16 golds match the number received at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. The medal count ranked 6th among all participating countries.

One thing I couldn't understand was the public apologies by the Japanese athletes who didn't win any medal or a gold. No need to apologize for doing one's best. The men's team gymnastics event was my favorite Olympic moment. When Tomita landed perfectly and everyone knew Japan bagged the gold. See photos of the Olympic torch relay here.

Cover photo and page design: © Philbert Ono

JAPANESE:

アテネへの火と夢
2004年6月6日に開催された都内の聖火リレーの写真コラージ。聖火ランナーの最後は愛ちゃんでした。撮影したのは、出発点の東京ビッグサイト(長嶋 一茂)、銀座(橋 幸夫)、浅草(古賀 稔彦)、表参道(一般)、とゴールの都庁都民広場(福原 愛)。岩崎 恭子と小谷 実可子も撮りたかったけどどこで走るか未公開のため、ダメでした。

ニッポンが史上最多のメダルを獲得して大変驚きました。気になったのは勝てなかった日本人選手が「申し訳ない」とよく謝る。全く謝る必要ない。一生懸命頑張ってくれて何が悪い??皆さんお疲れさまでした。40点以上の聖火リレーの写真をアップしました。どうぞご覧ください。
写真: © Philbert Ono.
ol300-20161007-3032.jpg
Victory parade for Japan's Rio Olympic and Paralympic medalists was held on Oct. 7, 2016 in Tokyo's Ginza and Nihonbashi areas. At Nihonbashi near Mitsukoshi Dept. Store.These photos were taken at Nihonbashi.
ol301-20161007-3017.jpg
About 800,000 crowded the sidewalks along the 2.5 km route on Chuo-dori that goes through Ginza 4-chome.
ol301-20191221-3897.jpg
Approaching the Olympic Stadium. The white tent is where we had to show our tickets.
ol302-20161007-3031.jpg
Crowd control
ol302-20191221-3903.jpg
Stadium gates opened at 2 pm, stadium seating opened at 4:30 pm, and the program started at 6:30 pm. Cold, overcast day, but fortunately, it didn't rain.
ol303-20161007-3029.jpg
ol303-20191221-3910.jpg
The stadium grounds has four gates (Sendagaya Gate, Gaien Gate, etc.) from the direction of train/subway stations. This map shows how far each train/subway station is.The closest is JR Sendagaya Station (440 meters) and Kokuritsu Kyogijo subway station (130 meters).
The stadium itself has eight main entrances from A to H. These main entrances further branch off into smaller entrances such as A1, A2, etc., leading to different floors and seating blocks.
The stadium seating sections are labeled Main Stand, Back Stand, North Stand, and South Stand. Each stand comprise three inclined tiers of seating. The Main Stand is the prime section. Gate F is nearest to the Japan Olympic Museum where the Olympic rings are.
ol304-20161007-3018.jpg
Passing out a newspaper extra about the parade.
ol304-20191221-3915.jpg
This shows how far each train/subway station is.
ol305-20161007-3034.jpg
The parade was headed by policewomen on white motorcycles. They wore the red Olympic uniform.
ol305-20191221-3917.jpg
Long line for the women's restroom on the ground floor. There are men's and women's restrooms on each floor. If the line is too long, just look for another one.
ol306-20161007-3039.jpg
Policewomen on white motorcycles.
ol306-20191221-3919.jpg
It was the first time the stadium saw this many people.
ol307-20161007-3041.jpg
ol307-20191221-3924.jpg
I walked completely around the stadium on the ground level outside.
ol308-20161007-3042.jpg
ol308-20191221-3927.jpg
Each gate had a bag checkpoint.
ol309-20161007-3049.jpg
Start of the parade of 50 Olympian and 37 Paralympian medalists on four double-decker, open top buses and two flatbed trucks. The Olympians wore red uniforms while the Paralympians wore white.
ol309-20191221-3930.jpg
Line to enter Gate H.
ol310-20161007-3058.jpg
Paralympians on a flatbed truck first appeared. They are wheelchair rugby players who won the bronze.
ol310-20191221-3931.jpg
Line to enter Gate H.
ol311-20161007-3062.jpg
Paralympians on a flatbed truck first appeared. They are wheelchair rugby players who won the bronze.
ol311-20191221-3934.jpg
ol312-20161007-3065.jpg
Paralympian wheelchair rugby players.
ol312-20191221-3940.jpg
Gate G, Aoyama Gate
ol313-20161007-3075.jpg
ol313-20191221-3944.jpg
Near Gate G, a large, fresco mosaic wall mural of Nomi no Sukune, a legendary sumo wrestler posing as a victor. By pioneering artist Hasegawa Roka (長谷川路可 1897–1967). This was preserved and moved here from the old National Stadium. So this work dates from 1964. 「野見宿禰」
ol314-20161007-3080.jpg
ol314-20191221-3941.jpg
Mosaic wall mural of Nomi no Sukune, a legendary sumo wrestler posing as a victor. By pioneering artist Hasegawa Roka (長谷川路可 1897–1967).
ol315-20161007-3086.jpg
ol315-20191221-3937.jpg
Another fresco mosaic wall mural by Hasegawa Roka. The Greek Goddess of Victory, depicting "Honor." This was preserved and moved here from the old National Stadium. 「勝利の女神」
ol316-20140507-5346.jpg
This is where Hasegawa Roka's pair of fresco wall murals were in the old National Stadium's main stand. Saw it in May 2014 when I toured the old 1964 Olympic Stadium before it was torn down to make way for the new stadium.
ol316-20161007-3082.jpg
Paralympians on a flatbed truck first appeared. They are wheelchair rugby players who won the bronze.
ol317-20161007-3090.jpg
ol317-20191221-3945.jpg
Looks like fire escape stairs, but they are normally used to exit the stadium. It was closed while people were entering the stadium (using escalators). The stairs were opened after the event ended.
ol318-20161007-3101.jpg
ol319-20161007-3105.jpg
ol319-20191221-3951.jpg
ol320-20161007-3106.jpg
ol320-20191221-3954.jpg
The stadium's design theme was "Forest Stadium." (杜のスタジアム). Lots of cedar lumber on the exterior. The wood came from all 47 prefectures and they point toward the place where they came from.
ol321-20161007-3108.jpg
ol321-20191221-3956.jpg
Stairs and escalator to the stadium's 2nd tier seats.
ol322-20161007-3110.jpg
Yui Kamiji, bronze medalist in women's single wheelchair tennis.
ol322-20191221-3957.jpg
Stairs and escalator to the stadium's 2nd tier seats.
ol322b-20191221-3948.jpg
Stairs and escalator to the stadium's 2nd tier seats.
ol323-20161007-3112.jpg
ol323-20191221-3958.jpg
ol324-20161007-3117.jpg
Olympian buses coming over Nihonbashi Bridge. As I had hoped, Nihonbashi was not as crowded as Ginza. In Ginza, there were people who waited from midnight or 5 am this morning to see this parade.
ol324-20191221-3909.jpg
Tanabata streamers from Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture. One event highlight was Tohoku festivals.
ol325-20161007-3123.jpg
Rio Olympic medalists parade on Oct. 7, 2016 in Ginza-Nihonbashi, Tokyo.
ol325-20191221-3970.jpg
Outside Gate E, there was a short pre-event performance of the Sendai Suzume Odori dance from Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture. The Suzume Odori (Sparrow Dance) is held in late July near Sendai Station. They performed in front of Tanabata streamers for which Sendai is famous in early Aug. 仙台すずめ踊り http://www.suzume-odori.com/
ol326-20161007-3125.jpg
ol326-20191221-3975.jpg
Sendai Suzume Odori dance. They were also going to be part of the main program inside the stadium. 仙台すずめ踊り http://www.suzume-odori.com/
ol327-20161007-3128.jpg
ol327-20191221-3996.jpg
Sendai Suzume Odori dance.
ol328-20161007-3131.jpg
ol328-20191221-4006a.jpg
Sendai Suzume Odori dance.
ol329-20161007-3133.jpg
ol329-20191221-4013.jpg
Sendai Suzume Odori dance.
ol330-20161007-3135.jpg
ol330-20191221-4016a.jpg
Sendai Suzume Odori dance.
ol331-20161007-3140.jpg
ol331-20191221-4020a.jpg
Sendai Suzume Odori dance.
ol332-20161007-3145.jpg
ol332-20191221-4040a.jpg
Sendai Suzume Odori dance.
ol333-20161007-3152.jpg
Kaori Icho, freestyle wrestler who made Olympic history by winning the Olympic gold medal four times in a row (since Athens in 2004). No other woman has won an Olympic gold that many consecutive times for an individual event.
ol333-20191221-4050.jpg
Stadium's ticket box office. It was closed since tickets to this event was sold in advance. First you had to apply for the ticket lottery online. If you won a ticket in the lottery (held at least 3 times), you could pay for it by credit card or at a convenience store. The ticket lottery and website were in Japanese only and geared for Japan residents with a cell phone. Very puzzling since it effectively shut out overseas visitors from buying a ticket. I didn't see any foreigners in the crowd. And yet, the event MC kept mentioning how it was for all nationalities, abled-bodied and disabled, all genders, all ages, etc., etc. No event info in English at all.
ol334-20161007-3155.jpg
Kaori Icho, freestyle wrestler who made Olympic history by winning the Olympic gold medal four times in a row (since Athens in 2004).
ol334-20191221-4062.jpg
Popular photo spot with the "National Stadium" sign. Near Gaien Gate.
ol335-20161007-3161.jpg
ol335-20191221-4085.jpg
ol336-20161007-3169.jpg
ol336-20191221-4078.jpg
The stadium as seen from Gaien Gate. This area is where they had food stalls and corporate sponsor booths.
ol337-20161007-3173.jpg
ol337-20191221-4070.jpg
The stadium as seen from Gaien Gate.
ol338-20161007-3175.jpg
ol338-20191221-4074.jpg
Food stalls.
ol339-20161007-3183.jpg
Sprinters and silver medalists Yoshihide Kiryu (middle) and Shota Iizuka (right) who got their Olympic glory in the 400-meter relay race
ol339-20191221-4075.jpg
Corporate sponsor booths.
ol340-20161007-3190.jpg
Sprinters and silver medalists Yoshihide Kiryu (middle) and Shota Iizuka (right) who got their Olympic glory in the 400-meter relay race
ol340-20191221-4104.jpg
Gate B2.
ol341-20161007-3198.jpg
ol341-20191221-4132.jpg
We all had reserved seating so there was no rush to get to our seats. But there was this long line for Gate A that led to seats on all three tiers (1st to 4th floors) in this section on the Main Stand. The line wound back and forth four times before we headed for Gate A.
ol342-20161007-3203.jpg
ol342-20191221-4133.jpg
Long and winding line for Gate A.
ol343-20161007-3205.jpg
On the right is Ayaka Takahashi, Japan's first badminton player to win an Olympic gold medal.
ol343-20191221-4152.jpg
The line moved quickly though. It took about 15 min. to get to the gate to go inside.
ol344-20161007-3209.jpg
On the left is synchronized swimmer Yukiko Inui who won two bronze medals for duet synchronized swimming and Team synchronized swimming at Rio.
ol344-20191221-4156.jpg
Entering Gate A for security check of our bags. Notice that Gate A branches off into smaller gates from A1 to A6. A1 goes to the 1st floor, A6 goes to the 4th floor.
ol345-20161007-3213.jpg
ol345-20191221-4169.jpg
Items not allowed: Knives, scissors (longer than 5.5 cm), poison, illicit drugs, flammable things, flares, fireworks, firecrackers, explosive items, oil, hammers, screwdrivers, chains, ice picks, glass bottles, cans, canned goods, raw eggs, and more. Plastic (PET) bottle drinks are allowed, but it may be subject to inspection.
Even this sign was not in English. So I guess they weren't expecting foreigners to attend this event.
ol346-20161007-3219.jpg
Paralympians not on wheechairs.
ol346-20191221-4171.jpg
Gate A6 led to escalators going to the 4th floor. The admission ticket tells you which gate to go to.
ol347-20161007-3231.jpg
Paralympians
ol347-20191221-4176.jpg
The turnstile used a QR code scanner. Show the QR code on your ticket and the turnstile unlocks for you to pass through.
ol348-20161007-3235.jpg
ol348-20191221-4178.jpg
The turnstile scanner machine (spare ones here).
ol349-20161007-3238.jpg
Paralympians
ol349-20191221-4187.jpg
Escalator to the upper floors.
ol350-20161007-3243.jpg
ol350-20191221-4219.jpg
Concourse on the 4th floor. This is open-air. Quite cold this day.Concourse on the 4th floor. This is open-air. Quite cold this day. I felt sorry for the staff who were working here, standing outside the corridor entrance to the seats.
ol351-20161007-3245.jpg
ol351-20191221-4274.jpg
A number of concession stands along the concourse, but long lines. I brought my own food and drinks, so I didn't bother to stand in line. No vending machines in the stadium. The cheapest drinks were ¥300.
ol352-20161007-3253.jpg
ol352-20191221-4268.jpg
Outside the concourse.
ol353-20161007-3262.jpg
ol353-20191221-4223.jpg
View outside the concourse, looking toward Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium and Sendagaya Station.
ol354-20161007-3274.jpg
ol354-20191221-4207.jpg
Stairs to the 5th floor where there is an open-air concourse with potted plants (Sora no Mori). But it was closed.
ol355-20161007-3272.jpg
ol355-20191221-4213.jpg
On the concourse, trash bins for burnables, plastics, and PET bottles.
ol356-20161007-3277.jpg
ol356-20191221-4258.jpg
Layout of seating blocks on the Main Stand on the 4th floor (Tier 3). Notice the many concession stands and restrooms. It may be confusing to see three seating tiers, but they are on different floors. The 1st tier is on the 1st floor, the 2nd tier is on the 2nd and 3rd floors, and the 3rd tier is on the 4th and 5th floors.
ol357-20161007-3281.jpg
ol358-20161007-3290.jpg
435 files on 2 page(s) 1