Image search results - "ibaraki"
001-IMG_7257.jpg
Welcome to IbarakiTrain platform of Kairakuen Station.
001-IMG_7557.jpg
Higashi Mito Station (on the way to Oarai)
002-IMG_7250.jpg
Train platform of Kairakuen Station
002-IMG_7559.jpg
Oarai StationShort ride from Mito Station.
003-IMG_7251.jpg
Train platform of Kairakuen Station
003-IMG_7561.jpg
Observation tower at the beach and a symbol of Oarai
004-IMG_7252.jpg
Plum Blossom Queen at Kairakuen StationShe was passing out maps of the garden. It was a nice touch to see two of these kimono beauties greeting us.
004-IMG_7563.jpg
Ferry port (service to Otaru, Hokkaido)
005-IMG_7260.jpg
Plum Blossom Queen
005-IMG_7565.jpg
Sign saying Oarai is famous for noren curtains.
006-IMG_7256.jpg
Entrance to garden via Tokiwa Shrine. One of Japan's three most famous gardens, Kairakuen is especially noted for thousands of plum blossom trees which bloom in Feb. and March.One of Japan's three most famous gardens, Kairakuen is especially noted for thousands of plum blossom trees which bloom in Feb. and March.
006-IMG_7566.jpg
Wave breakers
007-IMG_7266.jpg
Tokiwa Shrine, MitoDedicated to Lord Mitsukuni Tokugawa, the second lord of Mito, and Nariaki Tokugawa, the ninth lord of Mito and the one who built Kairakuen Garden.
007-IMG_7572.jpg
Resort hotel
008-IMG_7270.jpg
Bonsai plum treesI bought one of these once and the flowers smelled good before they withred away. The tree also died soon afterward.
008-IMG_7577.jpg
009-IMG_7272.jpg
Crowd at Higashi-mon East GateThis was the defacto main gate and most crowded since it is closest to the train station.
009-IMG_7579.jpg
The beach
010-IMG_7274.jpg
Map of Kairakuen, a garden built in 1841 by Tokugawa Nariaki (1800-1860), the ninth Lord of Mito. It is one of Japan's three most famous gardens.
010-IMG_7580.jpg
Oarai Isosaki Shrine's giant torii
011-IMG_7279.jpg
Pinickers
011-IMG_7583.jpg
Oarai Isosaki Shrine's giant torii
012-IMG_7312.jpg
Plum blossom-viewing picnickers
012-IMG_7590.jpg
Oarai town
013-IMG_7357.jpg
Red and white plum blossoms
013-IMG_7622.jpg
Oarai Isosaki Shrine torii at sea
014-IMG_7282.jpg
014-IMG_7626.jpg
Oarai Isosaki Shrine torii at sea
015-IMG_7335.jpg
White plum blossoms, the most common variety, and with the sweetest aroma.
015-IMG_7601.jpg
Oarai Isosaki Shrine torii at sea
016-IMG_7285.jpg
016-IMG_7620.jpg
Torii at sea
017-IMG_7296.jpg
Osaka-zuki red plum blossoms 大盃Osaka-zuki

大盃
017-IMG_7618.jpg
Shoreline
018-IMG_7297.jpg
Plum tree grove, about a week too early.
018-IMG_7628.jpg
Isosaki Shrine torii as seen from the beach
019-IMG_7402.jpg
Fantastically-shaped plum tree
019-IMG_7592.jpg
Isosaki Shrine's second giant torii
020-IMG_7404.jpg
Konan Shomu plum blossom 江南所無Prunus mume Kounanshomu
020-IMG_7634.jpg
Isosaki Shrine torii
021-IMG_7307.jpg
Plum Blossom Queens in Kairakuen, Mito
021-IMG_7643.jpg
Isosaki Shrine torii
022-IMG_7305.jpg
Plum Blossom Queens in Kairakuen, Mito
022-IMG_7654.jpg
Isosaki Shrine
023-IMG_7334.jpg
023-IMG_7646.jpg
Giant votive tablet (2006 is the year of the dog)
024-IMG_7341.jpg
Plum trees and Lake Senba
024-IMG_7651.jpg
Shrine
025-IMG_7331.jpg
Plum trees and Lake Senba
025-IMG_7657.jpg
Koma-inu lion dog and lanterns
026-IMG_7326.jpg
Plum trees and Lake Senba
026-IMG_7664.jpg
Boat museum within the shrine grounds
027-IMG_7323.jpg
027-IMG_7666.jpg
Path from shrine
028-IMG_7284.jpg
Torano-o plum blossom (Tiger's Tail) 虎の尾
028-IMG_7569.jpg
Seafood restaurants
029-IMG_7319.jpg
Pine trees and plum trees
029-IMG_7670.jpg
Seafood restaurants
030-IMG_7366.jpg
Plum tree grove
030-IMG_7679.jpg
Anko seafood soup (miso-based)
031-IMG_7373.jpg
Plum tree and train
031-IMG_7674.jpg
Fresh oysters
032-IMG_7358.jpg
Monument proclaiming Kairakuen as one of Ibaraki's 100 Best Sights
032-IMG_7673.jpg
Baby scallops
033-IMG_7371.jpg
Poem monument
033-IMG_7676.jpg
Ika squid
034-IMG_7377.jpg
034-IMG_7668.jpg
Dried fish
035-IMG_7342.jpg
Closeup of white plum blossom
035-IMG_7682.jpg
Train back to Mito.
036-IMG_7382.jpg
Closeup of red plum blossom
037-IMG_7378.jpg
038-IMG_7379.jpg
039-IBARAKI.jpg
Plum grove
040-IMG_7384.jpg
Path to natural spring
041-IMG_7390.jpg
Natural spring (cold water)
042-IMG_7395.jpg
Bamboo grovePine trees, bamboo, and plum blossoms are called Shochikubai in Japanese. This trio of trees is most famous.
043-IMG_7399.jpg
Omote-mon GateThis supposed to be the front gate.
044-IMG_7414.jpg
Kobuntei Villa has exquisite Japanese-style paintings on paper sliding doors. Kobuntei is closed until early 2012 since they are repairing earthquake damage.
045-IMG_7424.jpg
Kobuntei Villa was originally built in 1842 by Tokugawa Nariaki (1800-1860), the ninth Lord of Mito. It was his summer villa.
046-IMG_7426.jpg
Kobuntei Villa, fusuma sliding door with painting of plum trees
047-IMG_7427.jpg
Kobuntei Villa, fusuma sliding door with painting of azalea
048-IMG_7428.jpg
Kobuntei Villa, fusuma sliding door with painting of fall leaves
049-IMG_7429.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
050-IMG_7430.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
051-IMG_7431.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
052-IMG_7432.jpg
Kobuntei Villa, fusuma sliding door with painting of maple leaves
053-IMG_7434.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
054-IMG_7438.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
055-IMG_7439.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
056-IMG_7444.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
057-IMG_7447.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
058-IMG_7450.jpg
Kobuntei Villa, fusuma sliding door with painting of cherry blossoms
059-IMG_7452.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
060-IMG_7454.jpg
Cherry Blossom Room, Kobuntei Villa
061-IMG_7453.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
062-IMG_7455.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
063-IMG_7462.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
064-IMG_7464.jpg
Kobuntei suffered quite a bit of damage during the big earthquake on March 11, 2011. Repairs have started in Sept. 2011, and they hope to reopen the Kobuntei by Feb. 2012.
065-IMG_7470.jpg
066-IMG_7479.jpg
067-IMG_7486.jpg
068-IMG_7490.jpg
069-IMG_7500.jpg
070-IMG_7502.jpg
View from the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
071-IMG_7501.jpg
View from the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
072-IMG_7505.jpg
View from the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
073-IMG_7513.jpg
View from the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
074-IMG_7503.jpg
Inside the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
075-IMG_7508.jpg
Inside the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
076-IMG_7514.jpg
Balcony on the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
077-IMG_7516.jpg
078-IMG_7524.jpg
079-IMG_7538.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
080-IMG_7542.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
081-IMG_7545.jpg
Kobuntei Villa
082-IMG_7532.jpg
Natto fermented beans
083-IMG_7551.jpg
Kairakuen StationThis station, right before Mito Station, is open only during major flower seasons of Kairakuen.
ir030-20190503-2039.jpg
Hitachi-Otsu Ofune Matsuri fishing boat festival is Kita-Ibaraki's biggest festival, held only only once every five years on May 2 and 3 as the grand spring festival of Sawawachigi Shrine (佐波波地祇神社) in Otsu-cho, Kita-Ibaraki, Ibaraki PreHeld by local fishermen to pray for abundant fish and maritime safety. These photos were taken on May 3, 2019.
ir031-20190503-1899.jpg
Unique Shinto festival where they drag a sacred fishing boat across land instead of water. The boat has no wheels. All other boat festivals have the boat sailing on water, but not this one.
ir032-20190503-1897.jpg
On the May 2 festival eve, the boat is pulled from east to west along 1,200 meters in the center of town without the portable shrine aboard.
ir033-20190503-1903.jpg
On the May 3 main festival day, the boat is dragged along the same route west to east with the portable shrine and shrine priests aboard.This boat is here at the start point on May 3, 2019.
ir034-20190503-1895.jpg
White ropes to pull the boat on the road.
ir035-20190503-1892.jpg
The bow has this shed for the portable shrine to be loaded on. Festival was designated as a National Important Intangible Folk Cultural Property (重要無形民俗文化財) in 2017.
ir036-20190503-1894.jpg
Boat is 15 meters long, 4 meters wide, and weighs 5 tons. It becomes 2 tons heavier when the portable shrine (1 ton) and crew and musicians board.
ir037-20190503-1891.jpg
The ofune wooden fishing boat is painted with local fish.
ir038-ofuneMatsuri.youtube
My video of Kita-Ibaraki's Ofune Matsuri boat festival.
ir039-20190503-1890.jpg
Back of ofune boat.
ir040-20190503-1918.jpg
This festival was originally a portable shrine procession on the sea via boat going around the bay. But the boat's start point was filled in, so the boat procession was then held on land instead since 200 years ago.
ir041-20190503-1914.jpg
The festival started to be held every 5 years from 1975. The boat has to be repaired after each festival and the money could not be secured more often than every 5 years.The boat is normally displayed at a fishing museum named Yo-soro (よう・そろー) in Kita-Ibaraki.
ir042-20190503-1922.jpg
The festival used to be held by local fishermen, Now held by Hitachi-Otsu Ofune Matsuri Preservation Society (常陸大津の御船祭保存会) with most of the men being fishermen or their descendants.
ir043-20190503-1928.jpg
Paitning of a monkfish, a delicacy of Kita-Ibaraki.
ir044-20190503-1925.jpg
The boat rests on wooden pallets called "soroban." It is dragged on a bed of soroban pallets.
ir045-20190503-1930.jpg
ir046-20190503-1929.jpg
The festival originally used an actual fishing boat. But now this wooden boat was built especially for the festival.
ir047-20190503-2031.jpg
Sardines
ir048-20190503-1989.jpg
On May 3 from morning, they parade the mikoshi portable shrine bearing Sawawachigi Shrine's god for maritime safety.
ir049-20190503-2005.jpg
The festival participants belong to different fishermen's groups indicated by their shirt. They are from a group called Fudo-maru.
ir050-20190503-2080.jpg
Thank You Club
ir051-20190503-1932.jpg
This was the first Ofune Matsuri to be held in the new era of Reiwa.
ir052-20190503-2010.jpg
Group photos in front of the boat.
ir053-20190503-2017.jpg
Removing in the boat railingsbefore people boarded.
ir054-20190503-2028.jpg
Most boat musicians are local kids.
ir055-20190503-2041.jpg
ir056-20190503-2050.jpg
Boat musicians and crew board the boat via ladder.
ir057-20190503-2064.jpg
Looks like the boat captain.
ir058-20190503-2067.jpg
Boat crew waiting for the portable shrine to be loaded on the boat, which then becomes a "sacred boat."
ir059-20190503-2070.jpg
ir060-20190503-2078.jpg
After being paraded around town all morning, the portable shrine arrives near the boat.
ir061-20190503-2088.jpg
After being paraded around town all morning, the portable shrine arrives near the boat.
ir062-20190503-2133d.jpg
The boat crew welcome the portable shrine before it is loaded aboard.
ir063-20190503-2139.jpg
The portable shrine is loaded on the boat.
ir064-20190503-2185.jpg
Ahead of the boat, wooden pallets called "soroban" are laid on the road for the boat to be dragged on.
ir065-20190503-2253.jpg
They use about 100 soroban wooden pallets (ソロバン) made of Japanese oak tree, a hard wood. Each weighs 20 kg.
ir066-20190503-2201.jpg
Before dragging the boat, they violently rock the boat side to side.
ir067-20190503-2263.jpg
Boat is pulled by a 200-meter white rope, 7 cm thick. About 200 to 300 people pull the boat.
ir068-20190503-2282.jpg
ir069-20190503-2310.jpg
When dragging the boat, the men have to run over the wooden pallets and take care not to trip and fall.
ir070-20190503-2336c.jpg
They drag the boat 20 meters at a time. After each drag, they have to move and place the pallets ahead of the boat. The route is 1,200 meters long, and it takes 5 hours to reach the end.
ir071-20190503-2336d.jpg
Dragging the boat over the wooden pallets.
ir072-20190503-2336e.jpg
Ofune being dragged over wooden pallets.
ir073-20190503-2352.jpg
Pallets are ready for the next drag.
ir074-20190503-2360.jpg
There are men on both sides of the boat who rock the boat before the drag. When the boat moves, they hang on to the boat.
ir075-20190503-2337.jpg
ir076-20190503-2367.jpg
After the drag, they pick up the pallets and lay them in front of the boat on the road ahead.
ir077-20190503-2380.jpg
ir078-20190503-2396.jpg
ir079-20190503-2397.jpg
Narrow streets make it crowded.
ir080-20190503-2402.jpg
ir081-20190503-2403.jpg
The boat hull has small center ridges that keep it standing upright. It's also designed not to topple over when rocked.
ir082-20190503-2399.jpg
Three shrine priests are among the 40 people onboard. It's pretty rough to be rocked often. Motion sickness is possible.
ir083-20190503-2415.jpg
The boat is tilted to one side when it is dragged. It creates less friction and makes it easier to drag.
ir084-20190503-2418.jpg
Picking up the pallets.
ir085-20190503-2424.jpg
ir086-20190503-2430.jpg
ir087-20190503-2438c.jpg
The friction between the boat hull and pallets makes it smoke each time the boat is dragged. The pallets are scorched.
ir088-20190503-2438d.jpg
The route has one 90-degree corner where the boat is turned. This is a festival highlight and many people crowd this corner.
ir089-20190503-2438e.jpg
They turn the boat by dragging the stern of the boat. They had a rope tied to the rear part of the boat.
ir090-20190503-2438f.jpg
Turning the boat 90 degrees.
ir091-20190503-2438g.jpg
They turned the boat 90 degrees in one drag.
ir092-20190503-2439.jpg
Getting ready for the rest of the straight route.
ir093-20190503-2444.jpg
ir094-20190503-2465.jpg
This corner is the most crowded spot. Many people leave after seeing this corner turn.
ir095-20190503-2480.jpg
Shuttle bus back to JR Otsuko Station. Shuttle bus stop was near the start point a few hundrd meters from the corner.
ir096-20190503-2484.jpg
JR Otsuko Station
ir097-20190503-2488.jpg
JR Otsuko Station has its entrance modeled after the Rokkakudo Pavilion on the Izura Coast.
ir098-20190503-1877a.jpg
JR Otsuko Station platform.
ir099-20190503-2493.jpg
JR Otsuko Station platform.
ir150-20190227-1358.jpg
Kita-Ibaraki is a small, coastal city (pop. 42,000) with these picturesque cliffs of the Izura Coast (五浦海岸). Famous art scholar Okakura Tenshin (1863–1913 岡倉天心) found this scenic place to be a great inspiration for artists and moved here
ir151-20190227-1362.jpg
The small red pavilion is Izura Rokkakudo (五浦六角堂), the symbol of Kita-Ibaraki. Izura Rokkakudo was originally designed and built in 1905 by artist Okakura Tenshin (岡倉天心) as part of his residence. His house is on the left..
ir152-20190227-1378.jpg
In Kita-Ibaraki, Tenshin used Rokkakudo to listen to ocean waves and gaze at the scenery. On March 11, 2011, it was washed away by the tsunami, but it was rebuilt in 2012.
ir153-20190227-1355.jpg
Izura Rokkakudo (五浦六角堂) is now being maintained by Ibaraki University and it continues to be a sacred spot for Japanese artists.
ir154-20190227-1340.jpg
For a small admission fee, you can go down a path to see the Rokkakudo. (五浦六角堂).
ir155-20190227-1337.jpg
ir156-20190227-1335.jpg
The glass windows were made in the UK.
ir157-20190227-1334.jpg
ir158-20190227-1313.jpg
Must've been mesmerizing to pass time here. A place to attain artistic enlightenment.
ir159-20190227-1317.jpg
You cannot enter the Rokkakudo, but you can see inside through the glass windows made in the UK. There's supposed to be tatami mats inside.
ir160-20190227-1321.jpg
ir161-20190227-1302.jpg
About Rokkakudo.
ir162-20190227-1320.jpg
Scenery around Rokkakudo.
ir163-20190227-1331.jpg
Scenery in front of Rokkakudo.
ir164-20190227-1338.jpg
ir165-20190227-1323.jpg
Artist-inspiring scenery around Rokkakudo, Kita-Ibaraki.
ir180-20190227-1301.jpg
Tenshin's home on the Izura Coast, near the Rokkakudo Pavilion.
ir181-20190227-1341.jpg
Tenshin's home on the Izura Coast, near the Rokkakudo Pavilion. Can't go inside.
ir182-20190227-1342.jpg
Hina dolls displayed inside Tenshin's home for Girl's Day (March 3).
ir183-20190227-1345.jpg
About the Tenshin residence.
ir184-20190227-1346.jpg
ir185-20190227-1347.jpg
About the "Asia is One" monument.
ir186-20190227-1295.jpg
Along the path to Rokkakudo is this bust of Harvard professor and art historian Langdon Warner (1881–1955) who once studied under Tenshin and visited here. He is being revered here for supposedly helping to save Kyoto and Nara from World War II bombings
ir187-20190227-1296.jpg
About Langdon Warner.
ir188-20190227-1299.jpg
ir200-20190227-1389.jpg
Izura Misaki Park on the coast.
ir201-20190227-1351.jpg
Prop for the movie "Tenshin."
ir202-20190227-1364.jpg
Izura Misaki Park has this lookout tower. 五浦岬公園 展望慰霊塔
ir203-20190227-1369.jpg
View from the lookout tower.
ir204-20190227-1366.jpg
ir205-20190227-1130.jpg
Izura Coast
ir206-20190227-1133.jpg
ir240-20190227-1273.jpg
Tenshin Memorial Museum of Art, Ibaraki (茨城県天心記念 五浦美術館). Beautiful art museum in a beautiful place on the coast.
ir241-20190227-1279.jpg
Tenshin Memorial Museum of Art was named after Okakura Tenshin (aka Okakura Kakuzo 1863–1913 岡倉天心/覚三), a famous art scholar and advocate of Japanese art, especially Nihonga paintings.In 1890, he was one of the founders and the first de facto dean of the forerunner of the Tokyo University of the Arts (Geidai), one of Japan's most prominent art universities.
ir242-20190227-1278.jpg
Lobby of Tenshin Memorial Museum of Art.Tenshin is revered in Kita-Ibaraki because he moved his Nihon Bijutsu-in artist group (Art Institute of Japan) here from Tokyo in 1906. His students, prominent Nihonga painters Yokoyama Taikan (1868–1958), Hishida Shunso (1874–1911), Shimomura Kanzan (1873–1930), and Kimura Buzan (1876–1942) followed him to this picturesque Izura Coast and built artist studio residences near Tenshin's home. The residences of Tenshin, Taikan, and Buzan still remain.
ir243-20190227-1282.jpg
Tenshin Memorial Room explained the life and achievements of Tenshin. Founded Nihon Bijutsu-in (Art Institute of Japan) and moved it from Tokyo to Izura coast in Kita-Ibaraki in 1906.Includes exhibits about the time he worked at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in 1910 in charge of the Chinese/Japanese art division.
ir244-20190227-1286.jpg
Tenshin was proficient in English and wrote the classic book, "The Book of Tea" in English.
ir245-20190227-1348.jpg
Movie poster for the movie, "Tenshin." It was being screened in the city.
ir246-20190227-1290.jpg
The museum has fine views of the ocean and southern coast of Fukushima (Iwaki). You may also notice a power plant in the distance. That's not the one that had a meltdown in 2011. It's the Nakoso Power Plant (勿来発電所), a thermal power plant (non-nuclear) operated by Joban Joint Power Co., Ltd.
ir247-20190227-1276.jpg
Hina Matsuri dolls displayed at the museum entrance.
ir320-20190227-1129.jpg
Marsala restaurant near the Izura Coast. マルサーラ
ir321-20190227-1145.jpg
Marsala restaurant has Hawaiian decor.
ir322-20190227-1144.jpg
Marsala restaurant has Hawaiian decor, but no Hawaiian food. Only tropical drnks in summer.
ir323-20190227-1148.jpg
Appetizers. The food is good though.
ir350-20190227-1151.jpg
Kita-Ibaraki also has flat, sandy beaches.
ir351-20190227-1117.jpg
A sea wall being built. After 8 years, we hardly saw any other remnants of tsunami or quake damage.
ir352-20190228-3200.jpg
Tourist information center at JR Isohara Station.
ir353-20190228-3203.jpg
At JR Isohara Station, our tokkyu express train back to Ueno, Tokyo.
ir400-20190227-1353.jpg
Near Rokkakudo Pavilion on the Izura coast is Itsuura Kanko Hotel (五浦観光ホテル), pictured here on the cliffs. This was our hotel for the night. It had prime views of the coast.The hotel was high enough on the cliff to escape the five-meter-high tsunami on March 11, 2011. The hotel suffered only minor damage from the earthquake. The ground is very solid here, so quake damage was minimal.

Note that the hotel's name is pronounced "Itsuura" while the coast is "Izura." (Kanji characters are the same.) izura.net
ir401-20190228-2918a.jpg
In the hotel lobby: Kita-Ibaraki's official mascots, An-chan and Kou-chan. Together, they are "Ankou" which means "monkfish," or angler fish that is the city's most famous delicacy. An-chan is a fisherman, and Kou-chan is a monkfish.
ir402-20190227-1392.jpg
In the hotel lobby, Hina Matsuri dolls displayed for Girl's Day in early March.
ir403-20190228-2916.jpg
Lovely flowers in the hotel lobby.
ir404-20190227-1390.jpg
We arrived in the late afternoon in time for a tea ceremony in the hotel lobby. Conducted by the hotel's okami-san (proprietress 女将).
ir405-20190227-1396.jpg
My complimentary matcha tea and confections.
ir406-20190228-2926ItsuuraKankoHotel.jpg
Itsuura Kanko Hotel's okami-san or proprietress (女将) speaks English. The hotel also has English-speaking staff.
ir407-20190228-2895.jpg
Itsuura Kanko Hotel is quite unique and historical because it renovated the artist residences of Nihonga painters Yokoyama Taikan and Kimura Buzan and uses them as part of the hotel where guests can stay. We actually stayed in the Yokoyama Taikan residence here. (横山大観記念館 特別室)
ir408-20190228-2894.jpg
Entrance foyer of Yokoyama Taikan Memorial Hall where we stayed. Great private lodging for groups up to 22 people.
ir409-20190227-1448.jpg
Statue of Yokoyama Taikan (横山大観), a very famous Japanese Nihonga painter. Taikan was born in Mito, the capital of Ibaraki. (横山大観)
ir410-20190228-2910.jpg
Yokoyama Taikan (1868–1958) is one of the most famous Nihonga painters. His former residence includes a showcase of his artifacts.
ir411-20190228-2897.jpg
Main corridor inside Yokoyama Taikan Memorial Hall.
ir412-20190228-2898.jpg
ir413-20190227-1405.jpg
This used to be part of Yokoyama Taikan's living room, now one of the rooms where you can stay.
ir414-20190227-1406.jpg
Another room of the living room.
ir415-20190228-2900.jpg
Outside the living room, a moon-viewing deck.
578 files on 3 page(s) 1