Image search results - "hawai"
001-116_1687.jpg
Ehime Maru Memorial in Kakaako Waterfront Park, Honolulu えひめ丸慰霊之碑The memorial is on a slope with a good view of the ocean. It was indeed a suitable place for such a memorial.
002-116_1683.jpg
The memorial was unveiled on Feb. 9, 2002, a year after the accident.
003-116_1682.jpg
004-116_1677.jpg
On Feb. 9, 2001, a small Japanese fisheries training boat from Uwajima, Ehime Prefecture was struck by the USS Greeneville submarine as it bolted to the surface off the coast of Honolulu, Hawaii. Nine Japanese high school students, teachers, and crewmen died aboard the Ehime Maru. A year later, a waterfront memorial was built in Honolulu.
005-116_1679.jpg
Names of the nine Japanese who died
006-116_1678.jpg
Inscription in English
007-116_1680.jpg
Inscription in Japanese
008-116_1681.jpg
I hope the former submarine commander Scott Waddle comes here on each anniversary of the accident and pray for their souls.
010-107_0779.jpg
Entrance to Ikaho Onsen. Ikaho Spa has two Hawaii connections. One is with Hawaiian Minister to Japan Robert W. Irwin who had a summer house in Ikaho.
010-IMG_4207.jpg
June 9, 2007. Hula dancers rush to Pukari Sanbashi Pier where the Hokule'a canoe is to dock. ぷかりさん橋
011-107_0781.jpg
Ikaho is also a sister city of Hawaii island. During Aug. 5-7, 2003, Ikaho hosted the 7th King Kalakaua Merrie Monarch Hawaiian Festival featuring hula performances by numerous Japanese hula groups.
011-IMG_4213.jpg
A crowd of a few hundred on hand to greet Hokule'a's arrival.
012-106_0691.jpg
In the evenings, Hawaii's top hula halau (winner of the Merrie Monarch Festival in Hawaii) performed as the festival's main event. Photo: Flags of Hawaii and Ikaho town (merged with Shibukawa in 2006).
012-IMG_4211.jpg
People crowd the waterfront near Pukari Sanbashi Pier.
013-106_0692.jpg
Town parking lot with a makeshift stage and main venue of the festival. The "Merrie Monarch" refers to King David Kalakaua who reigned over the Hawaiian Kingdom 1874-1891. He promoted hula in Hawaii as well as Japanese immigration to Hawaii.
013-IMG_4263.jpg
People crowd the waterfront near Pukari Sanbashi Pier.
014-108_0876.jpg
Canopy for the spectators fronting the main outdoor stage.
014-IMG_4206.jpg
Hokule'a already in sight well before 11 am when it was scheduled to dock.
015-108_0872.jpg
Main stage where many Japanese hula troupes performed during the day for three days. Free admission.
015-IMG_4229.jpg
Hokule'a and escort ship Kama Hele. What makes this canoe so special and famous is that it was used to sail from Hawaii to Tahiti (and many other places) without any modern navigational instruments.
016-108_0871.jpg
Tahitian dances were also performed.
016-IMG_4237.jpg
They only referred to the sun, moon, the stars, and ocean waves to navigate through the vast Pacific Ocean or Polynesia. This is called celestial navigation. Extremely few people can do this, and the Hawaiians are learning this skill of long-ago.
017-108_0880.jpg
Hawaiian souvenirs for sale.
017-IMG_4238.jpg
They wanted to prove that the original native Hawaiians were able to sail between Tahiti to Hawaii on purpose, and that they did not land on Hawaii by accident.
018-108_0887.jpg
Ikaho is famous for the Stone Steps lined with shops. A section of it also served as a second hula stage during the day.
018-IMG_4244.jpg
Hokule'a and Yokohama Bay Bridge in the background.
019-108_0888.jpg
Hula on the Stone Steps 石段街
019-IMG_4249.jpg
One sail unraveled.
020-108_0857.jpg
Hula workshops are also offered during the day at cost. A famous kumu hula teacher from Hawaii teaches the class.
020-IMG_4254.jpg
Nearing Pukari Sanbashi Pier. The question was, which side of the pier would it dock? (Was going the other side so I rushed over to the other side.)
021-107_0788.jpg
Other workshops are held such as ukulele lessons and a lei-making class.
021-IMG_4258.jpg
Hokule'a nears the dock.
022-107_0796.jpg
In the evenings, the overall winner of the annual Merrie Monarch Festival in Hawaii performed on stage. In 2003, it was Hula Halau 'O Kamuela from Oahu. They performed both the ancient hula kahiko dances (pictured here) and modern auana dances in Ikah
022-IMG_4266.jpg
A rope is thrown to the dock from Hokule'a.
023-108_0804.jpg
The Ikaho hula festival is officially sanctioned by The Merrie Monarch Festival, held in spring in Hilo, Hawaii. It is the most important and prestigious hula competition.
023-IMG_4274.jpg
Hokule'a arrives right on schedule at 11 am on June 9, 2007. Yokohama is its last stop.
024-108_0808.jpg
Hula is also performed by men. These photos were taken during the 7th Ikaho Hawaiian Festival (Aug. 5-7, 2003).
024-IMG_4278.jpg
Hula dancers
025-108_0817.jpg
025-IMG_4277.jpg
Conch shell blowers signal the canoe's arrival.
026-108_0829.jpg
They wore a variety of colorful costumes and used various hula instruments such as these frayed bamboo sticks called Pūʻili.
026-IMG_4287.jpg
Pulling Hawaii's most famous canoe to dock.
027-108_0830.jpg
Modern hula dances such as this one is mainly for tourist entertainment.
027-IMG_4293.jpg
Under overcast skies, Hokule'a docks.
028-108_0827.jpg
028-IMG_4298.jpg
029-108_0826.jpg
029-IMG_4318.jpg
Escort ship (powered by a Yanmar engine) Kama Hele also docks soon afterward.
030-108_0831.jpg
030-IMG_4340.jpg
Koinobori carp streamers adorn Hokule'a. A great Japanese touch.
031-107_0746.jpg
After the bamboo sticks, the girls used a gourd drum called ipu.
031-IMG_4344.jpg
032-107_0749.jpg
Finally, they use feathered gourd rattles called Ulīʻulī.
032-IMG_4338.jpg
Escort ship Kama Hele flying the Japanese, Hawaiian, and Yanmar flags at Yokohama.
033-107_0750.jpg
033-IMG_4346.jpg
Welcome banner from Yanmar
034-108_0835.jpg
034-IMG_4300.jpg
Crowd on the waterfront near the pier.
035-108_0837.jpg
They are professional hula dancers, some of the best in the world.
035-IMG_4329.jpg
Hokule'a crew members
036-108_0842.jpg
The kumu hula is Kamana'o Anson Kauionalani or Kaui for short. He does a solo dance here. The music was performed by a wonderful Hawaiian trio called 'Ale'a.
036-IMG_4334.jpg
The Royal Order of Kamehameha I take part in arrival ceremonies. 入港式
037-108_0849.jpg
Finale. Also see photos of the 2008 Ikaho Hawaiian Festival here.
037-IMG_4355.jpg
Hokule'a arrival ceremonies
038-IMG_4369.jpg
Captain Bruce Blankenfeld places a lei on the bow.
039-IMG_4378.jpg
Hula dancers
040-IMG_4379.jpg
Hula dancers take part in arrival ceremonies.
041-IMG_4386.jpg
042-IMG_4394.jpg
Hokule'a crew dance on the canoe.
043-IMG_4401.jpg
Royal Order of Kamehameha I
044-IMG_4403.jpg
Royal Order of Kamehameha I wear red and gold capes.
045-IMG_4409.jpg
Royal Order of Kamehameha I leave the pier.
046-IMG_4408.jpg
047-IMG_4412.jpg
Conch shell blower
048-IMG_4423.jpg
Crew members hug each other.
049-IMG_4434.jpg
Former Yokozuna Akebono (blue shirt) and his family were also on the pier. (Wife and daughter in orange.)
050-IMG_4444.jpg
Nainoa Thompson and other crew members get off the boat. Nainoa was on board, but was not part of the crew who brought the canoe to Yokohama.
051-IMG_4461.jpg
Miss Yokohama also took part in the arrival ceremonies.
052-IMG_4472.jpg
Arrival ceremony ends and people start to leave the pier.
053-IMG_4475.jpg
Future Hokule'a Captain, Ka'iu Murphy.
054-IMG_4476.jpg
All the crew members met applause and handshakes.
055-IMG_4477.jpg
All the crew members were very friendly to all. This is Captain/Navigator Chadd Paishon.
056-IMG_4480.jpg
057-IMG_4482.jpg
Kimo
058-IMG_4487.jpg
Captain Blankenfeld who piloted the canoe to Yokohama.
059-IMG_4488.jpg
Finally, Nainoa Thompson makes his way from the pier and into the crowd.
060-IMG_4493.jpg
Nainoa Thompson
061-IMG_4496.jpg
Nainoa shook every single hand.
062-IMG_4497.jpg
He shook hands with EVERYBODY and ANYBODY.
063-IMG_4499.jpg
064-IMG_4507.jpg
The crowd was thrilled to be so close to this man full of aloha.
065-IMG_4522.jpg
People line up to shake Nainoa's hand or get his autograph or take his picture.
066-IMG_4530.jpg
067-IMG_4538.jpg
Nainoa has a habit of crouching on his knees so he can use his knee as a backing to sign autographs.
068-IMG_4539.jpg
"Here you go!"
069-IMG_4541.jpg
Plus a handshake for this little guy...
070-IMG_4550.jpg
He never refused to sign an autograph.
071-IMG_4554.jpg
072-IMG_4560.jpg
He never refused to shake a hand.
073-IMG_4563.jpg
This woman put a small necklace on him.
074-IMG_4566.jpg
I have never seen anyone who shook everybody's hand, signed autographs for everyone, and posed for all photographers. ナイノア・トンプソン
075-IMG_4579.jpg
Finally at the end, a little girl's artwork on a sheet of cloth catches his eye.
076-IMG_4582.jpg
He poses with the girl.
077-IMG_4583.jpg
He was so touched and impressed that he gave her a hug.
078-IMG_4589.jpg
He actually wanted her to keep her magnificant work of art, but she wanted him to have it.
079-IMG_4590.jpg
The little girl was in awe and speechless.
080-IMG_4594.jpg
He accepts the little girl's impressive gift.
081-IMG_4600.jpg
He folds the sheet neatly and carries it with him to a press conference which he was late in attending. An ideal Goodwill Ambassador.
082-IMG_4645.jpg
June 10, 2007. A formal welcoming ceremony was held the next day on an outdoor terrace near the pier. Unfortunately, it was a rainy day and attendance was much smaller than the day before. 入港歓迎セレモニー
083-IMG_4651.jpg
Captain Blankenfeld receives a gift.
084-IMG_4666.jpg
The ceremony included hula chanting and dancing.
085-IMG_4674.jpg
086-IMG_4682.jpg
087-IMG_4704.jpg
A local taiko troupe give a spectacular performance. 学校法人国際学園 星槎国際高等学校
088-IMG_4710.jpg
089-IMG_4715.jpg
090-IMG_4719.jpg
In return, the crew performs the haka dance.
091-IMG_4767.jpg
A small crowd watch the welcome ceremony. パシフィコ横浜国立大ホール前テラス
092-IMG_4721.jpg
Hula dancers watch the ceremony
093-IMG_4819.jpg
Nainoa Thompson gives a thank you speech with Hokule'a's captains.
094-IMG_4820.jpg
095-IMG_4772.jpg
096-IMG_4797.jpg
097-IMG_4811.jpg
Nainoa Thompson gave a touching speech about Japan-Hawaii friendship, their rediscovery of Japan ("Japan is not just Tokyo"), and Hokule'a's mission.
098-IMG_4827.jpg
Nainoa introduces the rest of the crew and future Hokule'a captains being groomed to take over.
099-IMG_4836.jpg
Hokule'a crew on stage.
100-IMG_4857.jpg
101-IMG_4862.jpg
102-IMG_4879.jpg
Hokule'a at Yokohama
103-IMG_4880.jpg
Hokule'a and Kama Hele in Yokohama, June 10, 2007
104-IMG_4891.jpg
Hokule'a, Kama Hele, and Yokohama Bay Bridge. Also see photos of the canoe tour.
105-IMG_4875.jpg
Pukari Sanbashi Pier. Hokule'a can be seen on the left. On the right is another pier for sightseeing boats. The building in the middle is a resthouse.
ha200-20171231-1866.jpg
Hawai Onsen hot spring is on the western shore of Lake Togo, a small brackish lake in Yurihama town in central Tottori Prefecture. A 15-min. bus ride from JR Kurayoshi Station at this bus stop.
ha201-20171231-1885.jpg
Lake Togo is a small brackish lake connected to the Sea of Japan through a 2 km river. The perimeter is 12 km, and there's a walking path. There are no swimming beaches.It is a rare lake in Japan to have hot spring water gushing out of the center of the lake. The warm water creates a misty lake surface in winter.
ha202-20171231-1888.jpg
The lake has Togo Onsen on the south shore, while the smaller Hawai Onsen is on the western shore. The lake has been in its current shape since at least the 13th century.
ha203-20171231-1871.jpg
Directional sign seen from the bus to Hawai Onsen.
ha204-20171231-1879.jpg
Hawai Onsen bus stop has this foot bath.
ha205-20171231-1875.jpg
Hawai Onsen was built on reclaimed land jutting over the lake where the natural hot spring water gushed out of the lake bottom. This reclaimed land now has a number of inns where guests can enjoy the hot spring water. Since "Hawai" sounds the same as "Hawaii", it has associated itself with Hawaii by holding a hula festival in July.
ha206-20171231-1890.jpg
Near Hawai Onsen is a nice lakeside park.
ha207-20171231-1893.jpg
ha208-20171231-1904.jpg
ha209-20171231-1895.jpg
Lake Togo on an overcast, winter day.
ha210-20171231-1905.jpg
Walking path around Lake Togo.
ha211-20171231-1881.jpg
Manhole for Yurihama town, Tottori Prefecture. Famous for Hawai Onsen, Togo Onsen, and Lake Togo.
ha212-20171231-1910.jpg
This lakefront space is used for the Hawaiian festival held in July.
ha213-20171231-1897.jpg
At the tip of the Hawai Onsen's reclaimed land jutting into the lake is an inn named Sennentei, one of the major inns.
ha214-20171231-1899.jpg
Hawai Onsen got its start in 1843 when local fishermen noticed warm spring water gushing out the lake bottom. The local Tottori lord gave them permission to utilize the hot spring water to make it easier to boil water, etc.
ha215-20171231-1912.jpg
In 1866, a former samurai stuck bamboo pipes into the lake bottom and was able to extract the hot spring water into a barrel on a boat above. It was an open-air spring bath on the rocking boat. This continued for some years until they finally reclaimed some land offshore in 1886 and drew the hot spring water directly below and even built a ryokan inn above. This was the start of commercial operations as "Asozu Onsen" (浅津温泉).
ha216-20171231-1916.jpg
Bridge to Sennentei. I decided to bathe in their outdoor bath. Most of the inns have baths for visitors costing up to ¥1,000. 千年亭
ha217-20171231-1925.jpg
Sennentei had a nice New Year's decoration with kadomatsu and tanuki. 千年亭
ha218-20171231-1928.jpg
Sennentei had a nice New Year's decoration with kadomatsu and tanuki. 千年亭
ha219-20171231-1937.jpg
Inside, Sennentei had a nice flower arrangement.
ha220-20171231-1934.jpg
Sennentei lobby.
ha221-20171231-1939.jpg
ha222-20171231-1930.jpg
Bathing fees for non-staying guests. ¥1,000 for adults. Towels for rent too.
ha223-20171231_1736a.jpg
Men's outdoor bath at Sennentei. (Segregated) Hawai Onsen, Tottori. 千年亭
ha224-20171231_1729.jpg
Men's outdoor bath at Sennentei. Nice view of the lake. Hawai Onsen, Tottori. 千年亭
ha225-20171231-1931.jpg
Gift shop at Sennentei.
ha226-20171231-1935.jpg
Gift shop at Sennentei sells Hawaiian chocolate.
ha227-20171231-1913.jpg
Another large inn at Hawai Onsen is Bokoro. 望湖楼
ha228-20171231-1943.jpg
This onsen had several name changes. In 1927, "Asozu Onsen" was renamed "Shin-Togo Onsen" (新東郷温泉). In 1978, it was renamed "Hawai Onsen" (羽合温泉). In 1998, they changed the Japanese name to はわい温泉 replacing the "hawai" kanji with hiragana.
ha229-20171231-1944.jpg
Gift shop near the bus stop back to Kurayoshi Station.
ha230-20171231-1947.jpg
Inside the Gift shop.
ha231-20171231-1948.jpg
Autographed daruma.
ha232-20171231-1949.jpg
Local souvenirs.
ha233-20171231-1951.jpg
Yurihama poster
ha234-20171231-1959.jpg
"Hawai" branch of this shop.
ha250-8920-28.jpg
Map of the Hawai-cho area.
ha251-8920-30.jpg
Hawai Rinkai Koen Beach Park in northern Lake Togo when I once cycled here. 羽合臨海公園
ha252-8920-31.jpg
Border of Hawai-cho (now part of Yurihama city).
ha300-P1040875.jpg
Main entrance to Spa Resort Hawaiians, a huge water park and onsen hot spring amusement facility built in 1966. I visited for the first time shortly after they reopened on Feb. 8, 2012.
ha301-P1040874.jpg
One wing of Hotel Hawaiians was still undergoing repairs to cracks.
ha302-P1040883.jpg
The new Monolith Hotel opened on Feb. 8, 2012.
ha303-P1040881.jpg
After completing earthquake repairs, the water park re-opened on Feb. 8, 2012. Admission was half price.
ha304-P1040880.jpg
Layout of Spa Resort Hawaiians.
ha305-DSC00921.jpg
ha306-P1040882.jpg
ha307-P1040864.jpg
From JR Yumoto Station, free shuttle buses run to Spa Resort Hawaiians.
ha308-DSC00909p.jpg
The huge water park at Spa Resort Hawaiians. All the water is from a hot spring. The pool water is lukewarm.
ha309-P1040884.jpg
The whole water park is heated to tropical temperatures even when it is freezing outside.
ha310-P1040890.jpg
The water slides cost extra money. 200 yen per slide.
ha311-P1040888.jpg
ha312-P1050077.jpg
ha313-P1050068.jpg
ha314-P1040891.jpg
ha315-P1040893.jpg
ha316-P1040948p.jpg
ha317-P1040887.jpg
ha318-P1040923.jpg
The water slides cost extra money. 200 yen per slide or a day pass for 2,200 yen.
ha319-P1040917.jpg
ha320-P1040885.jpg
ha321-DSC00912.jpg
Wading pool.
ha322-P1040886.jpg
Wading pool.
ha323-P1040922.jpg
ha324-P1040921.jpg
Besides the pools, there are real hot spring baths where you have to go in naked. Cameras not allowed though.
ha325-DSC00914p.jpg
Spring Park, a lukewarm hot spring pool.
ha326-DSC00918.jpg
Spa Garden Pareo has outdoor pools and a sauna. In winter, the air is freezing cold.
ha327-DSC00919.jpg
ha328-P1040913.jpg
Statue of King Kamehameha even!
ha329-P1040932p.jpg
Hula lesson for kids at the Beach Theater in the Water Park.
ha330-P1040937.jpg
Hula lesson for kids at the Beach Theater in the Water Park.
ha331-P1040925.jpg
ha332-P1040910.jpg
ha333-P1040939.jpg
ha334-P1040876.jpg
Beach Theater shows are free, but they also sell tickets for the best seats for ¥600 to ¥800.
ha335-P1050065p.jpg
Colored seats are reserved and cost extra.
ha336-P1050083.jpg
Hula Girl Polynesian Revue at 1:30 pm to 2:15 pm at the Beach Theater.
ha337-P1050087.jpg
ha338-P1050092.jpg
ha339-P1050094.jpg
ha340-P1050101.jpg
ha341-P1050103.jpg
ha342-P1050108.jpg
The live band were all Japanese. All the dancers were Japanese and most are from Fukushima.
ha343-P1050111.jpg
Fire knife dancers are the highlight and crowd pleasers. They are Japanese, but well-trained and highly skilled with the fire.
ha344-P1050114.jpg
ha345-P1050118.jpg
ha346-P1050124.jpg
ha347-P1050127.jpg
ha348-P1050130.jpg
Great dancers and great show!
ha349-P1050131.jpg
ha350-P1050133.jpg
ha351-P1050135.jpg
ha352-P1050137.jpg
ha353-P1050140.jpg
ha354-P1050142.jpg
ha355-P1050146.jpg
ha356-P1050147.jpg
ha357-P1050148.jpg
ha358-P1050150.jpg
ha359-P1050154.jpg
ha360-P1050157.jpg
This is Maluhia Yukari, the leader of the hula girls. She was a pivotal in taking the lead following the 3/11 disasters and promoting Spa Resort Hawaiians on tour. She retired in June 2012. マルヒア由佳理
ha361-P1050164.jpg
ha362-P1050166.jpg
ha363-P1050174.jpg
At the end of the show, people who paid for reserved seats could have their picture taken with the hula girls.
ha364-P1040962.jpg
The Hula Museum shows the history of Spa Resort Hawaiians first established as Joban Hawaiian Center in 1966.
ha365-P1040965.jpg
Congratulatory letter from the Governor of Hawaii, Linda Lingle, upon the opening of the Hula Museum.
ha366-P1040966.jpg
Congratulatory letter from the mayor of Kauai upon the opening of the Hula Museum.
ha367-P1050020.jpg
How Spa Resort Hawaiians got its start.
ha368-P1050027.jpg
Recruitment of hula girls.
ha369-P1050029.jpg
ha370-P1050030.jpg
ha371-P1050036.jpg
ha372-P1050014.jpg
ha373-P1050037.jpg
ha374-P1050048.jpg
Shortly after Joban Hawaiian Center opened in 1966, famous singer Aunty Genoa Keawe from Hawaii performed here.
ha375-P1050040.jpg
ha376-P1050043.jpg
ha377-P1050054.jpg
ha378-P1040969.jpg
Hawaiian movie posters.
ha379-P1040971.jpg
Hawaiian records by Japanese artists.
ha380-P1040982.jpg
The second room of the Hula Museum introduces hula.
ha381-P1040987.jpg
817 files on 4 page(s) 1