Image search results - "festival,"
001_0220-13.jpg
Held in July, Narita Gion Matsuri Festival has ornate floats pulled on the streets of Narita and to Narita-san temple. Pulling a float on the street
001_2527.jpg
From late April to early May, five long strings of giant carp streamers swim in the air high above the Sagami River in Sagamihara, Kanagawa. This event was started in 1988.
001_7491.jpg
The biggest taiko drum festival in the Kanto region is held annually in April. Various taiko drum troupes perform for two full days on various outdoor stages in Narita, including the main stage in front of the Narita-san temple.
001_9162.jpg
One of two giant kitesThis festival has two giant kites and two smaller (but still large) kites. Resting on its side, the kite was scheduled to fly at 2 pm. The kanji characters read "Michi no Eki" in reference to a new train station built in the town.
001_9664.jpg
Festival's focal pointThis grass hut is at the center of the festival site which is within the Sakitama Tumuli Park. It will be burned later in the evening for the festival's climax.
002_0220-25.jpg
Pulling the float, Narita Gion Matsuri
002_2542.jpg
There are five rows of streamers. In Japan, the koi carp is regarded as a symbol of valiant manhood because it swims up the river against the rapids.
002_7503.jpg
002_9169.jpg
002_9684.jpg
Offerings
003_0220-26.jpg
Tired from walking, Narita Gion Matsuri
003_2518.jpg
The cable length is 250 meters and 13mmm thick. There are about 1,200 carp streamers. They are reused every year and donated by local families. (I also noticed a few advertising carps.)
003_7500.jpg
003_9153.jpg
003_9658.jpg
Festival siteIt is a circular site with people sitting along the perimeter.
004_0065.jpg
004_0220-29.jpg
004_7488.jpg
004_9177.jpg
Lowering the kite
004_9662.jpg
SpectatorsThese people are sitting in the best area to view the festival.
005_0221-19.jpg
005_7502.jpg
005_9226.jpg
005_9679.jpg
EntertainmentAn outdoor stage provides a variety of entertainment during the day.
005_9922.jpg
006_0221-22.jpg
006_7594.jpg
006_9215.jpg
006_9750.jpg
Festival participantsThey are dressed in the costume of the ancient Kofun (Tumuli) Period of Japan. They will be carrying torches from the nearby tumuli.
006_9946.jpg
Sagami River Koi-nobori
007_0221-16.jpg
007_7600.jpg
007_9192.jpg
Patch up
007_9731.jpg
TumulusCherry trees are at the top.
007_9990.jpg
008_0221-23.jpg
008_7609.jpg
008_9213.jpg
008_9756.jpg
Shinto ceremonyAt around 6:30 pm, the festival climax starts.
008_9952.jpg
009_0221-17.jpg
009_7557.jpg
009_9273.jpg
Moving the kite to launch point
009_9772.jpg
Torch bearers enter
009_9987.jpg
010_0221-14.jpg
010_7511.jpg
010_9137.jpg
Festival siteThey did not allow people go enter the launch area at all times. Spectators were kept far away.
010_9776.jpg
Marvelous spectacle
010_9982.jpg
The longest carp is 10 meters.
011_0221-13.jpg
Narita Gion Matsuri
011_7531.jpg
011_7544.jpg
011_9141.jpg
011_9789.jpg
Parade aroundThe torch bearers parade around the entire perimeter before they gather around the hut.
011_9981.jpg
Koi-nobori carp streamers over Sagami River. Also see the video at YouTube.
012_0221-11.jpg
Narita Gion Matsuri
012_7481.jpg
012_9281.jpg
No people on the sides either
012_9797.jpg
Also see the video at YouTube.
012_9916.jpg
Along the river were food stalls.
013_0221-8.jpg
013_7482.jpg
013_9317.jpg
Launch point on a low hill
013_9785.jpg
Male prince
013_9915.jpg
Festival site
014_007-1Apr9.jpg
014_0221-5.jpg
014_2579.jpg
Cable anchor
014_9330.jpg
014_9787.jpg
Female princess reigning over the Sakitama Fire Festival in Gyoda, SaitamaShe's 15 years old.
015_007-3.jpg
015_0224-5.jpg
015_2580.jpg
Statistics
015_9334.jpg
Also see the video at YouTube.
015_9817.jpg
016_007-7.jpg
016_0221-29.jpg
Side entrance to Narita-san temple.
016_9338.jpg
Ride'em cowboyAs the kite quickly flew up, the forward kite pullers had to release the rope.
016_9834.jpg
Torch lightingThe prince and princess light the torch that will ignite the hut.
017_007-8.jpg
017_0221-32.jpg
Offering prayers at Narita Gion Matsuri
017_9358.jpg
017_9844.jpg
Climax
018_0221-31.jpg
018_7576.jpg
018_9376.jpg
018_9849.jpg
019_0221-36.jpg
019_7584.jpg
019_9381.jpg
019_9868.jpg
020_0222-10.jpg
Gathering at Narita-san temple
020_7588.jpg
020_9384.jpg
Michi no EkiThe kite design is the same every year, but the kanji characters change. They make a new giant kite every year.
020_9859.jpg
Torch bearers from the tumulus
021_0222-25.jpg
Prayers at Narita-san
021_7659.jpg
021_9400.jpg
021_9888.jpg
Stage ceremonyThe torch bearers gathered in front of the stage where there were speeches and cheers.
022_0222-4.jpg
Narita Gion Matsuri
022_9413.jpg
022_9902.jpg
FireworksThe festival ended at 7:30 pm.
023_0222-9.jpg
023_4Taiko061.jpg
023_9416.jpg
024_007-11.jpg
Main stage at Narita-san temple.
024_0223-15.jpg
024_9418.jpg
025_007-14.jpg
025_0223-20.jpg
025_9425.jpg
Smaller kite "Yujo"
026_0223-23.jpg
Narita-san during Narita Gion Festival
026_7682.jpg
1 comments
026_9426.jpg
027_007-19.jpg
027_0223-25.jpg
027_9428.jpg
028_0223-26.jpg
028_7784.jpg
Main stage at Narita-san temple.On Saturday evening, the festival climaxes with a free show on the main stage. The best taiko troupes from Japan and overseas performed for 2 hours.
028_9436.jpg
"Yujo"This is a smaller kite. It means "Friendship."
029_0223-27.jpg
029_7797.jpg
029_9438.jpg
030_0223-36.jpg
030_7803.jpg
030_9454.jpg
031_0224-2.jpg
Narita Gion Matsuri
031_7827.jpg
Drum troupe from S. Korea
031_9459.jpg
032_7858.jpg
032_9470.jpg
033_7870.jpg
Taiko troupe from OkinawaThis group stole the show with a dragon dance, lion dogs, and eisa taiko drummers.
033_9480.jpg
034_7884.jpg
034_9482.jpg
She fell
035_7905.jpg
035_9492.jpg
Patch up
036_7910.jpg
036_9501.jpg
037_7917.jpg
037_9511.jpg
038_7937.jpg
038_9517.jpg
"Nakama"This is another smaller kite. It means "Circle of Friends."
039_7955.jpg
039_9522.jpg
Anchor truck
040_7966.jpg
040_9536.jpg
Amateur areaFurther downwind was the amateur area for flying normal kites.
041_7970.jpg
041_9539.jpg
Another launch
042_7994.jpg
042_9540.jpg
043_8004.jpg
Last group
043_9542.jpg
044_9546.jpg
Another beautiful take off
045_9547.jpg
046_9548.jpg
047_9554.jpg
048_9558.jpg
049_9574.jpg
050_9577.jpg
Poster
IMG_2659.jpg
Mud Paddy. Main site of the Warabi Hadaka Matsuri held every Feb. 25.
IMG_4141.jpg
IMG_4156.jpg
Preparing for the seaDuring a break, the mikoshi is prepared for a run in the ocean.
IMG_4157.jpg
IMG_4158.jpg
IMG_4161.jpg
IMG_4164.jpg
IMG_4165.jpg
IMG_4166.jpg
IMG_4168.jpg
Water's edge
IMG_4170.jpg
Down ramp
IMG_4175.jpg
Also see the video at YouTube.
IMG_4192.jpg
At seaShrine helpers on a boat splash buckets of sea water on the mikoshi bearers.
IMG_4212.jpg
Blessings at seaThe mikoshi and bearers are blessed by a shrine priest on a boat wielding a sacred staff.
IMG_4225.jpg
IMG_4231.jpg
IMG_4236.jpg
IMG_4237.jpg
IMG_4243.jpg
IMG_4244.jpg
IMG_4266.jpg
IMG_4283.jpg
Mikoshi made of acorns
IMG_4287.jpg
Crossing over
IMG_4293.jpg
IMG_4295.jpg
IMG_4298.jpg
Passing Enoshima Station
IMG_4305.jpg
Passing by Ryukoji Temple
IMG_4315.jpg
Mikoshi face-offThe shrine from Yasaka Shrine on Enoshima is the male (left), and the mikoshi from Koyurugi Shrine (foreground) is female.
IMG_4322.jpg
Tram breakPart of the procession route also happened to be the Enoden streetcar route so we had to make way for the passing streetcar every 15 min. or so. There were streetcar personnel who blew their loud whistles whenever a streetcar was to pass through. I got scolded for sticking out my head to take this shot.
IMG_4333.jpg
Mikoshi couple. Also see the video at YouTube.
IMG_4349.jpg
Streetcar break
IMG_4398.jpg
Parading along a shopping street
IMG_4408.jpg
IMG_4416.jpg
KnockersWhen they carry the mikoshi, a pair of knockers on both sides the mikoshi are struck to make a rhythmic sound.
IMG_6505.jpg
Mimusubi Shrine, Yotsukaido, Chiba. The small shrine that conducts the festival. (皇産霊神社)
IMG_6506.jpg
Baby Blessings at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba. Infants are blessed in front of the shrine.
IMG_6507.jpg
Men Take Strands of Straw
IMG_6508.jpg
A Man and a Baby at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba.
IMG_6510.jpg
Babies to Mud at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba. The men carry babies to the mud paddy and use a straw strand to paint a dot on the baby. Sometimes they use a finger to do it.
IMG_6511.jpg
IMG_6513.jpg
IMG_6522.jpg
Sacred Water (and Mud). On the the left, the water feeding the paddy is enclosed by a sacred rope. This makes the water (and mud) sacred.
IMG_6577.jpg
All the baby-carrying men must be careful not to slip and fall in the mud. Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba.
IMG_6608.jpg
Mud Spotting, Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba. The men hold babies and use mud to paint a mud spot on the baby's face. It is to wish for happiness for the baby.
IMG_6609.jpg
Some babies wear beautiful kimono for the occasion.
IMG_6624.jpg
The festival is also nicknamed "Doronko Matsuri" which means Mud Festival.
IMG_6632.jpg
Mud Fight
IMG_6634.jpg
Keep in mind that this is in the middle of winter.
IMG_6636.jpg
IMG_6640.jpg
Mud Fight. After clashing and crashing to the mud, they throw mud at each other.
IMG_6643.jpg
They are in the mud for only a few minutes. Then they go back up to the shrine nearby and warm up near a fire. They go back and forth between the shrine and mud paddy about 4 or 5 times.
IMG_6687.jpg
A Touch of Mud. One custom is to receive a touch of mud on your face.
IMG_6719.jpg
Mud for All Ages
IMG_6722.jpg
Mud Brings Happiness, at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba.
IMG_6729.jpg
New Status Symbol at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba.
IMG_6731.jpg
Mud on Your Face: Fashionable, at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba.
IMG_6737.jpg
After warming up at the fire, they run back to the mud.
IMG_6739.jpg
Mud Fight Round 2
IMG_6741.jpg
IMG_6744.jpg
IMG_6748.jpg
Mud Slinging
IMG_6749.jpg
IMG_6751.jpg
IMG_6753.jpg
I can't see... That's what he said: "Mienai" The kids nearby were screaming with laughter.
IMG_6754.jpg
IMG_6762.jpg
Warm Up
IMG_6763.jpg
IMG_6776.jpg
The End(s)
za601.jpg
The following photos were taken on May 5, 2005. The site is on a baseball field, very dusty. The site is directly south and downstream from the Sagamihara kite festival site.It was a great idea to hold both kite festivals on the same days. We could see both in one day.
za602_0333.jpg
za603_0356.jpg
za604_0347.jpg
za605_0341.jpg
Corner rope work
za606_0344.jpg
za607_6910.jpg
Do not enter sign. In 2004, on a very windy day (almost typhoon strength), Zama's giant kite broke in the air and crashed to the ground onto spectators (who got hurt) on the side, right beyond the carp streamers in this picture. So from 2005, they have become very strict and cordoned off the area where the kite crashed.
za608_0381.jpg
Ready and all clear
za609_0376.jpg
za610_0386.jpg
Lift off despite weak winds
za611_0387.jpg
za612_0417.jpg
za613_0391.jpg
za614_0395.jpg
za615_0421.jpg
Zama's kite apparently was lighter than Sagamihara's kite because it went up much higher under the same wind conditions.
za616_0394.jpg
The kite pullers can only run so far (about 50 meters or so). After that, if the wind doesn't kick in, the kite falls back down.
za617_0400.jpg
za618_0330.jpg
Rope anchor
za619_0324.jpg
Rope anchor
za620_0320.jpg
Entertaiment
za621_0314.jpg
Children's sumo. Zama had a variety of side events.
za622_0427.jpg
Disassembly
za623_0434.jpg
309 files on 2 page(s) 1