JAPAN PHOTOS by Philbert Ono

*Be sure to wear a mask when in crowds.

Image search results - "shore"
kb900-20181024-0028.jpg
This is Shorenkan Yoshinoya (昭恋館よ志のや), a hot spring ryokan on the Tango Peninsula (Kyotango). Founded in 1928, it has 11 guest rooms.
kb901-20181024-0026.jpg
Lobby entrance.
kb902-20181023-0555.jpg
Lobby
kb903-20181023-0557.jpg
Nice Japanese-style room.
kb904-20181024-0024.jpg
View from my room.
kb905-20181024-0025.jpg
View from my room.
kb906-20181024-0006.jpg
This is the dressing room for the bath named "Shoren-no-Yu" (昭恋の湯). (“Shoren” means “Love of the Showa Period.” And “Yu” means hot spring water.)The ryokan had two hot spring baths, and both were designed by an American.
kb907-20181024-0009.jpg
Dressing room.
kb908-20181024-0007.jpg
Entrance to the bath area.
kb909-20181024-0011.jpg
The "Shoren-no-Yu" (昭恋の湯) bath was originally an abandoned building that was renovated into a bath with a high ceiling and garden. Most everything was designed by Alexander Wilds and his artist wife Yukiko Oka. Wilds is an American sculptor from New Orleans living in Japan since 1985. He currently teaches art at Yamanashi Gakuin University in Kofu, Yamanashi Prefecture.
kb910-20181024-0013.jpg
For Shoren-no-Yu, Alexander Wilds and his artist wife Yukiko Oka designed and built most everything including the garden. The shelves in the dressing room were made by his friend. Stained glass was made by his mother. Ceramic tiles are Mexican, leftover from a previous project of his. The bathhouse was originally an abandoned house which he stripped.
kb911-20181024-0020.jpg
Since the ryokan celebrates the Showa Period (implied by the name "Shorenkan"), he aimed to make the bath have a Showa/Taisho Period feel. It was a tough job because they had to haul everything in and out manually. No accessible road so they had to roll the wooden barrel tub to the building manually (it couldn’t be rectangular). This bath was built during June to Oct. 2003.
kb912-20181024-0015.jpg
The bath in a wooden barrel. They allowed men and women to use this bath on alternate days.http://alexanderwilds-japan.blogspot.com/2017/12/alexander-wilds-architecture-yoshinoya.html
kb913-20181024-0018.jpg
Facing the bath's garden area.
kb914-20181023-0564.jpg
This is the other bath named “Vidro-no-Yu” (ビードロの湯) and also designed by Alexander Wilds and his artist wife Yukiko Oka. The indoor part. The glass windows were a design highlight (hard to see because of the steam and dark night). The glass door opens to a balcony with a bath.
kb915-20181023-0566.jpg
Outdoor baths on the balcony. It was night so I couldn't see the scenery. But it was great that we could try these two different baths during our overnight stay.
kb916-20181023-0567.jpg
kb917-20181023-0569.jpg
Indoor bathing area.
kb918-20181023-0572.jpg
Dining room.
kb919-20181023-0574.jpg
Dinner started with this.
kb920-20181023-0576.jpg
kb921-20181023-0583.jpg
Shorenkan Yoshinoya ryokan is probably more famous for its food, especially crab during crab season (Nov. to March). But it wasn't crab season when we were there so we didn't have any crab. But the food was still excellent. Kyotango, Kyoto Prefecture.
kb922-20181023-0586.jpg
kb923-20181023-0588.jpg
Yuzu sherbet. Yummy!
kb924-20181024-0001.jpg
Breakfast.
kb925-20181024-0004.jpg
BreakfastShorenkan Yoshinoya Map: https://goo.gl/maps/hAHehEVDsft
http://taiza.jp/en/
ot282-20090409_8792.jpg
ot283-20090409_8761p.jpg
Lakeside at Zeze Castle Park.
ot284-20090409_8763p.jpg
Lakeside at Zeze Castle Park with Omi Ohashi Bridge in the distance.
ot285-20090409_8767.jpg
ot286-20090409_8768.jpg
ot287-IMG_5265.jpg
Gift coupons in exchange for black bass and blue gill fish. If you catch a non-native fish like black bass and blue gill fish in the lake, don't throw it back into the lake. This was at Zeze Castle park.
ot288-IMG_5266.jpg
Walking path along Zeze Castle Park.
ot289-IMG_5272.jpg
ot290-20090409_8803.jpg
Local community center designed after Zeze Castle.
sh010-IMG_7293.jpg
Adogawa also has a shoreline road and cycling road. This is how it looks. Entering Adogawa from Shin-Asahi.
sh011-IMG_7294.jpg
sh012-IMG_7298.jpg
Adogawa River
sh013-IMG_7300.jpg
sh014-IMG_7304.jpg
sh015-IMG_7305.jpg
sh016-IMG_7306.jpg
Kamo River empties into Lake Biwa.
sh017-IMG_7308.jpg
Entrance to Omi-Shirahama Beach
sh018-SHIRAHAMA.jpg
Omi-Shirahama Beach on Lake Biwa. MAP
te021-IMG_5583.jpg
Rocky shore
te022-IMG_5584.jpg
Windsor Hotel in the distance.
te023-IMG_5581.jpg
The water is very transparent.
tk200-20090410_9209.jpg
Shirahige-no-Hama Beach in Takashima. I know they did some filming here for the NHK Taiga Drama "Go" where she rides on horseback. 白ひげの浜
tk201-20090410_9208.jpg
Shirahige-no-Hama Beach and Lake Biwa in Takashima, Shiga Prefecture.
tk202-20090410_9215.jpg
tk203-20090410_9211.jpg
tk204-20090410_9218.jpg
tk205-20090410_9221.jpg
tk206-20090410_9223.jpg
tk207-20090410_9222.jpg
tk250-20090410_9226.jpg
Entrance to Haginohama Beach. 萩の浜
tk251-20090410_9227.jpg
tk252-20090410_9233.jpg
A small stream empties into Lake Biwa through Haginohama Beach. Numerous streams and rivers like this one feed water to the lake.
tk253-20090410_9229.jpg
A small stream empties through Haginohama Beach
tk254-20090410_9230.jpg
Haginohama Beach in Takashima.
tk301-IMG_7314.jpg
tk302-IMG_7315.jpg
tk303-IMG_7316.jpg
River mouth
tk304-IMG_7321.jpg
There was a green belt called Kamogawa Katsuno Enchi. It was basically a beach park.
tk305-IMG_7338.jpg
Kamogawa Katsuno Enchi park in Takashima. 鴨川勝野園地
tk306-IMG_7323.jpg
tk307-IMG_7329.jpg
tk308-IMG_7331.jpg
The sand is not as nice.
tk309-IMG_7325.jpg
tk310-IMG_7332.jpg
This is close to Haginohama Beach.
tn018-IMG_00013.jpg
How the lake was formed.
tn019-IMG_00014.jpg
Northern Lake Toya
tn020-IMG_00016.jpg
Pier
tn021-IMG_00008.jpg
Reeds barely grow here.
yu010-20080925_0213.jpg
Kannonzaki Park juts into Uraga Channel, the mouth of Tokyo Bay. It is a large park on a cape with walking paths and a lighthouse. 観音崎公園
yu011-20080925_0217.jpg
Kannonzaki Park
yu012-20080925_0381.jpg
The shore is rocky.
yu013-20080925_0226.jpg
Lots of ships pass by here.
yu014-20080925_0388.jpg
yu015-20080925_0385.jpg
Cape Kannonzaki is at the tip closest to Uraga Channel, the narrow mouth of Tokyo Bay. Ships must pass through here to enter or depart Tokyo Bay.
yu016-20080925_0389.jpg
Container ships, oil tankers, passenger ships, navy ships, etc., all pass through here. Anybody have a picture of an aircraft carrier passing by here?
yu017-20080925_0390.jpg
If you like ship watching, come to Kannonzaki.
yu020-20080925_0247.jpg
Lookout point at Kannonzaki Park.
yu021-20080925_0255.jpg
yu022-20080925_0378.jpg
Looks like the devil's washboard.
yu023-20080925_0262.jpg
yu024-20080925_0265.jpg
Walking path around Kannonzaki.
yu026-20080925_0275.jpg
Types of ships that pass by.
yu027-20080925_0277.jpg
Map of Kannonzaki drawn by Commodore Perry when he first arrived in 1853.
yu028-20080925_0287.jpg
yu029-20080925_0280.jpg
Kurihama in the distance.
yu030-20080925_0300.jpg
yu031-20080925_0303.jpg
More ships
yu032-20080925_0301.jpg
Kurihama in the distance.
yu033-20080925_0294.jpg
yu034-20080925_0306.jpg
yu036-20080925_0310.jpg
Tatara-hama Beach
     
97 files on 1 page(s)