Image search results - "sea"
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Sign for Tomonoura
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Ferry for Tomonoura
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Ferry boat from Takamatsu to Megishima. 20 min. ride.
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Megishima is associated with Momotaro, a famous folk tale.
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Megishima beach 女木島
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View from lookout deck
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Seto Inland Sea as seen from Megishima, Kagawa Pref.
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Seafood restaurants
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Looking toward Takamatsu
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Anko seafood soup (miso-based)
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Fresh oysters
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Looking toward Ogishima in Seto Inland Sea. 男木島
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Baby scallops
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Ika squid
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Leaving Megishima
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Dried fish
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Train back to Mito.
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Inside our boat to Kure from Etajima.
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Kure across the Inland Sea.
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Kure is a short boat ride from Etajima.
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On the way to Kure.
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A few islands in the Seto Inland Sea on the way to Kure. In Kure, we visited the Yamato Museum.
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Sea gulls in Hokkaido all face the same direction. They must be Japanese birds who like to conform to the group.
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Fixed-seat boat race.
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Fixed-seat boat race. フィックス艇
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Mt. Ibuki in the background with fixed-seat boat racing. The Lake Biwa Rowing Song was also played as the regatta's background music.
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Chikubushima in the background with fixed-seat boat racing.
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The Japanese Overseas Migration Museum is operated by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in Yokohama. There are permanent exhibitions explaining the immigration to Hawai'i, continental USA, and South America.
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There are also changing or special exhibitions so it's worth visiting more than once. Besides exhibition rooms, the museum has a reference library (closed on Sun.) with a collection of 20,000 books and materials about Japan's immigration.It even has kami-shibai (picture card stories). You can browse through recent Japanese novels such as "Japanese-Americans 99 Years of Love."
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Entrance to Japanese Overseas Migration Museum. 10 am - 5 pm (enter by 4:30 pm), closed Mon. (open if a national holiday and closed on Tue. instead) and Dec. 29-Jan. 3.The museum is operated by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) which is Japan's version of the Peace Corps.
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The museum also has a restaurant with an outdoor terrace (open 11:30 am - 1:30 pm, 5:30 pm - 9 pm).
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Oregon Japanese farmers
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Total number of emigrants from Japan was 760,000.
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This map shows how many emigrated from each prefecture. Hiroshima had a whopping 109,893 number of emigrants.
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Okinawa also had a large number of emigrants: 89,424
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Hawaii exhibit had a Newspaper ad: "Go to Hawaii as a migrant worker and become rich"
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Hawaii emigration exhibit at Japanese Overseas Migration Museum, Yokohama
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Hawaii emigration exhibit at Japanese Overseas Migration Museum, Yokohama
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Kanyaku imin for emigrants to Hawaii
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Kanyaku imin labor contract between Robert W. Irwin and a laborer dated Jan. 1885. (Replica) More about Robert Irwin here.
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Medals donated by Robert Walker Irwin's granddaughter Yukiko Irwin to the Japanese Overseas Migration Museum. On left is the Royal Order of Kamehameha I, Knights Grand Cross Star. The medal on the right is The Order of the Rising Sun.
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Royal Order of Kamehameha I, Knights Grand Cross Star awarded by King Kalakaua for distinguished service to the king and the people of Hawaiʻi.
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Roster of kanyaku imim laborers to Hawaii. 1885 (replica)
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This page in the roster shows people from Suo Oshima, Yamaguchi Prefecture. More about Suo-Oshima here.
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Employee ID tag (bango 番号) from Maui, and a check sent home by an immigrant in Hawaii (replica). 1889
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Passport issued to one of the first Kanyaku-imin emigrants to Hawaii. (Replica)
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History of Japanese emigration to overseas.
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History of Japanese emigration: Embarking on the voyage and emigration restrictions.
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US-Japan Treaty of Amity and Commerce, signed in 1858 in Edo (replica)
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Tariff Convention, signed on July 25, 1866 in Edo. (Replica)
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"Journey to the Americas" exhibit
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Passport dating from 1866-1876. From 1876, the present Japanese word for "passport" (ryoken 旅券) began to be used. Before that it was called "menjo 免状."
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S.S. City of Tokio brought the first Kanyaku Imin to Honolulu, Hawai'i in Feb. 1885 after leaving Yokohama in Jan. A few months later in June 1885, the ship ran aground and sank in Tokyo Bay.
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Tools used by Japanese immigrants in Brazil.
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Passports issued to picture brides stopped in 1920. This young couple had a picture marriage right before then.
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Anti-Japanese campaign poster in Washington state, USA, 1921.
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Japanese-Americans during World War II.
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The S.S. Nippon Maru, the last emigrant ship that departed Yokohama on Feb. 14, 1973. Migrants by ship decreased dramatically by the 1960s due to air travel and higher living standards in Japan.
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Luggage to Brazil. Crate has marking for Omi-cha tea from Shiga Prefecture.
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Guide book for those wanting to emigrate to Hawaii, 1904. (replica)
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What the immigrants brought with them to Brazil.
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Luggage and personal effects brought by the immigrants. This person arrived Brazil in 1931. Japanese footwear, umbrella, sewing kit, hair cutter.
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The person brought a karate uniform when emigrating to Brazil in 1968 and established a karate school.
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Cosmetics
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Medical things and medicines
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Coffee in Brazil
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Coffee beans in Brazil
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Farmers and fishermen in the Americas.
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Sports, religion, women's groups, and other Japanese organizations.
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Agriculture
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Japanese schools were started so that the nisei children could learn Japanese and be better prepared when or if their parents decided to move back to Japan.
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Japanese school activities
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Japanese-language newspapers started to be published (mimeographed) from the 1890s in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Six-generations of a family on Maui, Hawai'i. They started with immigrants from Yamaguchi Prefecture in 1891.
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Also see my list of other Japanese-American and nikkei museums in Japan here..
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Across from Ineura Park is the new Ine Tourist Information Center on the 1st floor and a restaurant (Funaya Shokudo 舟屋食堂) on the second floor where we had lunch.
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Ine Tourist Information Center on the 1st floor.
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Funaya Shokudo restaurant. http://www.ine-kankou.jp/taste/funayashokudo/
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We had the Funaya Teishoku for lunch mostly seafood, worth ¥2,000.
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Funaya Shokudo restaurant menu.
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About Ine and funaya.
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As each boat leaves, sea gulls follow.
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The sea gulls follow where there's food, and the tourists are happy to toss junk food at them.
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They even sell bird food on the boat.
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These birds fly very close, within arm's reach.
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Face to face with a bird. "Hey, any food for me??"
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January: A Japanese White Eye visits the Cherry Blossoms. Okinawa is the first place in all of Japan to see these blossoms and they bloom through the month into early February. All photos copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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February: A bullfight at the Ishikawa-Dome in Uruma City took place as part of the Lunar New Year festivities. While all of Japan utilizes the Gregorian calendar, many traditions in Okinawa revolve around its historical ties with China. By Michael LynchPhoto copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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March: The weather starts to warm up, schools have their Spring break and tourists begin to flock to the many attractions available throughout the island. This is Katsuren Castle, which overlooks a peninsula on the East coast of Okinawa.Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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April: A black Pacific Reef Egret gathers building materials for a nest at Red Beach. Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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May: Eisa, a dance originally associated with ancestor worship during the Obon holidays, is now practiced at any festival or cultural event. Here, at Henza Island, a small festival celebrating Golden Week, the spirit of Okinawa was demonstrated in musicMay: Eisa, a dance originally associated with ancestor worship during the Obon holidays, is now practiced at any festival or cultural event. Here, at Henza Island, a small festival celebrating Golden Week, the spirit of Okinawa was demonstrated in music and dance to the enjoyment of all in attendance. Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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June: Hiji Waterfall in Kunigami is the largest in Okinawa and attracts many visitors from mainland Japan. It provides a refreshing, cool break after the 45 minute hike, along a nature trail, to reach this beautiful scene.Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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July: A Shisa (Lion-Dog) seems to dwarf the Royal Hotel in Yomitan, which is on the West coast of the island. Another influence from trade with China, the Shisa may be seen everywhere in the Prefecture, warding off evil spirits. This one stands...July: A Shisa (Lion-Dog) seems to dwarf the Royal Hotel in Yomitan, which is on the West coast of the island. Another influence from trade with China, the Shisa may be seen everywhere in the Prefecture, warding off evil spirits. This one stands around 30 feet tall, most tile-roofed homes have Shisa closer to a foot tall guarding them, either mounted on the roof or walls surrounding the house. Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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August: The lively lead-singer of a popular band named Zukan jumps and shouts while performing at the Kin Festival. During the summer months there are festivals every weekend, somewhere on the island.Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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September: This young lady is trying on Kimonos at a shop in Naha in preparation for “Coming of Age Day” which is celebrated in January. During the 3d week of January, all who turned twenty years of age during the past year are initiated as adults..September: This young lady is trying on Kimonos at a shop in Naha in preparation for “Coming of Age Day” which is celebrated in January. During the 3d week of January, all who turned twenty years of age during the past year are initiated as adults. Her mother is preparing her early. Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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October: A parade of traditional Okinawan Kimonos and headwear takes place every year on Kokusai Street in Naha, where a reenactment of the coronation of the King and Queen of the Ryukyu Kingdom is performed.Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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November: This dragon statue guards the corner in front of the Uruma City office. Dragons are part of many Asian sea-faring cultures folklore and Okinawa also holds year-round Dragon boat races.Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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December: A white Pacific Reef Egret catches breakfast on the east coast of Okinawa. Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.Photo copyright 2009 Michael Lynch.
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It's a scenic boat ride between Ozushima and Tokuyama in the Seto Inland Sea with lots of boats.
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Oil refineries along Tokuyama.
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Leaving Ozushima.
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Quite a few islands in the Seto Inland Sea are scarred by cement makers.
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Secluded beach on an island. So many islands in Seto Island Sea.
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Tokuyama, Shunan
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Tokuyama Port offloading a container ship for Costco.
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Tokuyama Port offloading a container ship for Costco.
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There are a few small islands near Suo-Oshima, uninhabited.
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And a few white-sand beaches.
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Once in a while, we saw a white-sand beach.
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Rural bus stop
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Got off here at Suo-Hachiman stop in Kuka.
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Suo-Oshima island, Yamaguchi manhole
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Centipede
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On the island, I also visited the town of Kuka where there is a Hawaiian restaurant called Aloha Orange (unfortunately closed when I was there).
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Kuka Folk History Museum
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Hachiman Continuing Education Village has a folk history museum, meeting rooms, hall, cultural facilities, and a small cafe. 八幡生涯学習のむら
     
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