JAPAN PHOTOS by Philbert Ono

*Be sure to wear a mask when traveling.

Image search results - "moto"
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Kameyama Castle is now headquarters to a religion called Omoto-kyo which acquired the castle property in 1919. Only stone walls and moats remain.Statue of shachihoko.
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Toriimoto-juku is the sixty-third of the sixty-nine stations or shukuba post towns on the Nakasendo Road. It is the fourth Nakasendo station in Shiga (following Bamba-juku in Maibara), and one of ten Nakasendo stations in Shiga.
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Kameyama Castle
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Although the Honjin is long gone, there are a few reminders of its shukuba past. Near Ohmi Railways Toriimoto Station. Map
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Statue of shachihoko roof ornament
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Ohmi Railways Toriimoto Station platform
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Castle compound and moat
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Ohmi Railways Toriimoto Station building
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Castle moat
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Ohmi Railways Toriimoto Station building
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Toriimoto Station building built in 1931 when the station opened and still in use.
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Hiroshige's woodblock print of Toriimoto (64th post town on the Nakasendo) from his Kisokaido series.
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Entrance to Omoto-kyo HQ and former castle grounds
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Toriimoto-juku is the sixty-third of the sixty-nine stations or shukuba post towns on the Nakasendo Road. It is the fourth Nakasendo station in Shiga (following Bamba-juku in Maibara), and one of ten Nakasendo stations in Shiga.
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Stone foundation
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Site of Honjin Lodge
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About the Tokyo Motor Show...Makuhari Messe is near Kaihin Makuhari Station on the Keiyo and Musashino Lines. The huge show occupies the entire Makuhari Messe consisting of the North, East, Center, and West Halls, and Event Hall. Admission was 1200 yen. The show sees over 1.4 million visitors.

Although this is called the 39th Tokyo Motor Show in 2005, the first motor show was held in 1954 and called the 1st All-Japan Motor Show. The venue was Hibiya Park in Tokyo. In 1964, the show was renamed "Tokyo Motor Show." The show was held annually until 1973 when the oil shock occurred. It was so severe that organizers decided to hold the show every other year. No show was held in 1974. From 1975, the show was held every other year. 2005 is actually the 50th anniversary of the motor show.

In 1958, the venue changed to Korakuen Bicycle Racing Stadium. Also in 1958, the date was changed from spring (April-May) to fall (Oct.-Nov). In 1959, the venue was switched to Harumi at the domed Tokyo International Trade Center where it would remain until 1987 when it moved to Makuhari Messe in 1989. In 1970, foreign automakers participated in the Tokyo Motor Show for the first time.

In 1999, the show combined passenger cars and motorcycles. Also, in 1999, the show for commercial vehicles was omitted and instead to be held in a separate show in alternating years starting in 2000. The motor show for passenger cars and motorcycles would continue to be held every two years from 1999. So there would be a Tokyo Motor Show every year, but the purpose would alternate between passenger cars/motorcycles and commercial vehicles.

During the 1st motor show in 1954, when most of the vehicles displayed were for commercial use, the attendance was 547,000. In 1963, it exceed 1 million over 16 days. It hovered around 1.4 million in the years following. The record attendance was attained in 1991 with over 2 million visitors during 15 days. In 2003, the total attendance was 1.424 million.

In 2000, at the first Tokyo Motor Show dedicated to commercial vehicles, attendance was a mere 177,900 over 5 days. In 2004, attendance was 248,600 over 6 days.

The ubiquitous female companions, attendants, or models that we see today started appearing at the show from as early as 1957. They do not only decorate the show, but they also reflect the fashion of the times. Their hairstyles, wardrobe, skirt length, make-up, etc. The Tokyo Motor Show is not only a showcase for cars, it is also a fashion showcase. Therefore, in this online photo gallery, you will see not only cars, but also women. Enjoy!
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Nakasendo Road
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Police station
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Plaque
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Road marker
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Road marker: Go left for the Nakasendo Road or right for the Hikone Road.
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The best-looking lady at the show...A Lambo of course. Lamborghini, everyone's all-time, ultimate dream car. (Besides Speed Racer's Mach 5.) This is the Murcielago.
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Yakuimon Gate at the Arikawa machiya home. Emperor Meiji rested at the Arikawa home. A family still lives in this home. 有川家住宅 薬医門
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Main building of the Arikawa home, Toriimoto's most distinguished-looking building. This main building was built in 1759. The Arikawa family were a drug manufacturer. The home was designated as an Important Cultural Property in 2012.
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Lamborghini MurcielagoNo price was listed. But if you have to ask, then it's too expensive.
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Lamborghini MurcielagoOnly with a Lamborghini would I tell any pretty woman standing in front of it to move away so I can see and photograph the car better. Actually, I'm not that rude, so I just waited until she went away.
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Lamborghini Murcielago. Although this is called the 39th Tokyo Motor Show in 2005, the first motor show was held in 1954 and called the 1st All-Japan Motor Show. The venue was Hibiya Park in Tokyo. In 1964, the show was renamed "Tokyo Motor Show.&quoThe best-looking rear at the show...
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Kumamoto Castle before the earthquake. Unfortunately, it suffered major damage by the Kumamoto earthquake and remains closed. 熊本城
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Suizenji Park 水前寺成趣園
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Kusasenri park 草千里Grassy park on the periphery of Mt. Aso.
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Kumamoto Castle 熊本城
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Suizenji Garden, Kumamoto 水前寺成趣園Mt. Fuji
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Horseback riding at Kusasenri. 草千里
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Kumamoto Castle 熊本城
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Aso Volcano Museum 阿蘇火山博物館
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JR Kumamoto Station at night.
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Modern museum inside Kumamoto Casstle
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Kusasenri
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JR Kumamoto Station
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JR Kumamoto Station some years ago.
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Views from castle tower
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View of Mt. Aso
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Views from castle tower
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Kusasenri parking lot
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Grass skiing
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Moat
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Grass skiing
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Spectacular ropeway ride
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Aso-san Ropeway 阿蘇山ロープウェー
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Lamborghini Gallardo Spyder. The show was held annually until 1973 when the oil shock occurred. It was so severe that organizers decided to hold the show every other year. No show was held in 1974. From 1975, the show was held every other year.The Murcielago attracted more attention.
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Ropeway
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Aso Crater rim
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Notice the emergency shelters.
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Mt. Naka-dake is Mt. Aso's most famous crater, Kumamoto 阿蘇山 中岳火口Measures 1 km wide north to south and 4 km east to west.
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Mt. Naka-dake in Aso-san, Kumamoto. Measures 1 km wide north to south and 4 km east to west. 阿蘇山 中岳火口
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Always smoking, Mt. Naka-dake in Aso-san, Kumamoto 阿蘇山 中岳火口
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Crater rim
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Sign for taking "I was here" photos.
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World's largest caldera still active.
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No entry
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Toyota stage. In 1958, the venue changed to Korakuen Bicycle Racing Stadium. Also in 1958, the date was changed from spring (April-May) to fall (Oct.-Nov). In 1959, the venue was switched to Harumi at the domed Tokyo International Trade Center.Toyota had a large spread in the Center Hall.
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Inside emergency shelter.
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Spectacular rock and cliff formations.
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Fantastic artwork by nature
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Art of nature
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Natural sculptures
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Walking back instead of taking the ropeway.
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Ropeway
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Aso Station
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Toyota Fine-X. In 1989, the show moved to Makuhari Messe. In 1970, foreign automakers participated in the Tokyo Motor Show for the first time.All the major car makers showed concept cars or prototypes. This one is by Toyota. All four wheels can turn. Makes it easy to parallel park in tight spaces, but how do you steer it?
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Toyota Fine-XThe driver's seat swivels outward.
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Toyota i-swingA single-seater, reminds me of a Segway with a seat. Controlled with a joystick and shifting your body weight. It has 3 wheels. If they don't allow Segways in Japan, I wonder if they would allow this on Japanese streets. Would it need a license plate? And would we need a license to operate it?
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Toyota i-swingI waved to her, and she waved back...
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Nissan Pivo with swivel topElectric car with a top that swivels 360˚ so you can drive forward or back without turning the car around. Seats three people. The driver sits in the middle.

I waved to her, and she waved back...
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Nissan Pivo
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Nissan booth
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Nissan GT-R Proto
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Honda Sports 4 ConceptI like this picture.
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Honda Sports 4 Concept
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HondaThis is what she looks like up close.
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Honda Sports 4 ConceptI smiled at her, and she smiled back...
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It's worth visiting Kamikochi, and it's very scenic for Japan, but I think the Swiss Alps are more beautiful.
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Kamikochi is accessible by bus from the Matsumoto Bus Terminal near JR Matsumoto Station.
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Lots of forest.
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Kappabashi Bridge and the Hotaka mountains at Kamikochi, Nagano. 河童橋と穂高連峰
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Kappabashi Bridge is the focal point of Kamikochi.
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View from Kappabashi Bridge over Azusa River. 梓川
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Kappabashi Bridge
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Kamikochi, Nagano
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Honda W.O.W. ConceptHonda had nice women posing, but I was hoping they would bring out the Asimo robots to introduce the cars.

I smiled at her, but she never noticed me...
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Suzuki LC. LC stands for Life Creator. These girls were dancing and hopping around the car before they settled down and posed.
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Suzuki LCI looked at her, and she looked at me. I didn't wave, so she didn't wave...
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Suzuki IonisA real ballerina-type model danced in front of the car. I like this picture.
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Subaru 360 (from 1958). Nicknamed "Ladybug."
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Subaru R1 and Subaru 360The new ladybug meets the old.
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Subaru Impreza WRC 2006 PrototypeIn 2004, Subaru won the Rally Japan 2004 (the first FIA WRC hosted in Japan). The car was driven by Petter Solberg. It is a race on public roads.
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Subaru
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Daihatsu HVS
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Daihatsu2 comments
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Daihatsu SK-Tourer
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Daihatsu SK-Tourer
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Daihatsu. I smiled at her, and she smiled back...
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Daihatsu
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Daihatsu
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DaihatsuDaihatsu had the best show performance. The models and performers wore a variety of costumes.
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DaihatsuA show worth seeing twice.
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Daihatsu
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Daihatsu
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Daihatsu
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Mitsubishi Motors
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Mitsubishi Motors
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Mitsubishi MotorsShe attracted a big crowd of snapshooters and oglers.
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Kia Sports ConceptFirst-rate model who knows how to smile.
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Kia MotorsA crowd favorite. Kia (not her name) is from South Korea.
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Ferrari 612 Scaglietti
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Ferrari F430 SpiderLamborghini set out to build a better car than Ferrari, and he attained his goal. I like Ferrari (especially the Testarossa), but I like Lambo better.
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Chevrolet Corvette ConvertibleCorvette, but why no Camaro at the show too?
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Chevorlet Corvette Z06
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HummerShe was charming...
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General Motors Cadillac STS-VI yearn for the days when Cadillac had more elegant car names like Fleetwood, Eldorado, and Seville. Now it's all three-letter names. I can hardly remember them. And the cars look so ugly (in my opinion).
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Rolls Royce Phantom
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Porsche 911 CarreraRed was definitely the most popular car color at the show.
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Porsche
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SLR McLarenBest-looking car with gills.
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BMW Z4 Coupe ConceptMatte paint finish, no gloss.
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Bugatti Veyron 16.4
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Volkswagen
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Volkswagen Golf
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Volkswagen
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OpelYes, some girls don't need to smile to look good.
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Clarion. The ubiquitous female companions, attendants, or models that we see today started appearing at the show from as early as 1957. They do not only decorate the show, but they also reflect the fashion of the times.I approached her and she struck this pose instinctively.
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ClarionDefinitely Miss Photogenic.
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PanasonicAnother nice one.
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PanasonicAwful costume I thought.
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Fujitsu
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Alpine + iPod
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AlpineShe had horde of photographers crowded in front of her. But she managed to find me and smiled.
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Honda S600 (1964)The Event Hall had displays of nostalgic cars from the 1950s to the 1990s. This Honda was from 1964.
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Toyota Corolla (1967)The Event Hall had displays of nostalgic cars from the 1950s to the 1990s.
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Daihatsu BEE (1951)The Event Hall had displays of nostalgic cars from the 1950s to the 1990s. Three wheels.
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Harley-Davidson VRSCD Night RodNice curves...
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Harley-Davidson FLST Heritage SoftailWorld premiere of this bike.1 comments
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Harley-Davidson. In 1999, the show combined passenger cars and motorcycles. Also, in 1999, the show for commercial vehicles was omitted and instead to be held in a separate show in alternating years starting in 2000.
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Harley-Davidson FXDI 35th Anniversary Super GlideWorld premiere of this bike.
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Kawasaki MotorcyclesKawasaki had a bevy of leggy beauties promoting their cycles. They didn't dance, but served well to attract attention.
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Kawasaki ZZR 1400 ABS motorcycleI looked at her and she smiled.1 comments
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Kawasaki MotorcyclesOne of the best-looking motorcycle models.
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Kawasaki MotorcyclesI wasn't one of them.
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Honda Motorcycles
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Honda E4-01 motorcycle
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Honda E4-01 motorcycle
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Yamaha Gen-Ryu motorcycle
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Yamaha MotorcyclesYamaha's booth was the most elegant in the motorcycle section.
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Suzuki Stratosphere motorcycleSuzuki put on a great show with a bunch of girls doing hip-hop dancing.
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Suzuki MotorcyclesSuzuki put on a great show with a bunch of girls doing hip-hop dancing.
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Suzuki Motorcycles
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Yamaha MotorcyclesAt the end of the day, the companions line up in front of their booth to say goodbye. Great photo op too.
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Honda MotorcyclesAt the end of the day, the companions line up in front of their booth to say goodbye. Great photo op too.
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Hakone-Yumoto Station, the main gateway to Hakone. Odakyu Line trains from Shinjuku and Odawara arrive here.
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Hakone-Yumoto Station used to be light blue, but now off-white.
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Hakone-Yumoto Station
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Romance Car (Limited Express train) at Hakone-Yumoto Station
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Hakone-Yumoto Station changed quite a bit since the last time I visited.
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Hakone-Yumoto Station now has an overpass for pedestrians.
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This is the old Hakone-Yumoto Station.
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Hakone Yumoto from the overpass
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Hakone Yumoto souvenir shops.
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Hakone manju is famous.
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At Hakone-Yumoto Station, I asked about a good place to dip into a hot spring before going back to Tokyo. A short walk across the river to Yumoto Fujiya Hotel and ¥1,800 put me in this nice outdoor bath.
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This large rock was perfectly slanted to sit back in the bath and gaze at the greenery and blue sky. After all that walking, I thought I got my money's worth.
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Bus terminal at Hakone Yumoto
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Took a bus to Yunessan.
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Interesting "ON-OFF" poster at a train station in Hakone. It basically reads "ONsen" (hot spring) and "OFFuro" (bath). It was for a hot spring facility called Yunessan
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Hakone Kowakien Yunessan, a hot spring facility famous for hot spring baths in different flavors. Yunessan admission is ¥2,900 for adults and ¥1,600 for kids. They also have a pure hot spring area where bathing suits are not allowed. That's ¥1,900 for adults. You can go to both areas for ¥4,100 if you don't mind your skin being deprived of too much natural skin oil and a prolonged increase in blood pressure. http://www.yunessun.com/enjoy/
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Hakone Kowakien Yunessan's main bath for bathing suits.
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This is the wine bath. It does smell like wine. I didn't dare taste it, and there's a sign saying not to drink the water. This bath used to be outdoors, but now totally indoors which was disappointing.These flavored baths are for both men and women in bathing suits.
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Tea bath
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Tea bath was nice.
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Coffee bath. Mild aroma of coffee.
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Sake bath was not really sake (I tasted the water). Only a tiny trickle of sake was dripping into the bath.
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Also popular was the "Doctor Fish" foot bath. These little fish come and eat away your feet's unwanted skin flakes.
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People (kids) who had healthy skin did not attract much fish. It's really ticklish.
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About Doctor Fish
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Outdoor cavern bath
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Outdoor slides at Yunessan.
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Held annually on Nov. 3, a national holiday (Culture Day), the Hakone Daimyo Gyoretsu Procession starts at Yumoto Elementary School at 10 am. About 170 people dressed in feudal-era costume are in the procession. 湯本小学校
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Yumoto Elementary School is where the procession started at 10 am. The procession route is quite long, about 6 km. The procession ends at 2:30 pm. 湯本小学校
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They had a short ceremony and briefing.
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Special guest was former Yokozuna Wakanohana aka Hanada Masaru acting as the daimyo lord. Every year, they have a celebrity as the daimyo.
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The procession reenacts the daimyo procession of Okubo Tadazane (Kaga no Kami), lord of Odawara on his way to Edo (Tokyo) for the periodic sankin kotai procession.
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Daimyo's wife
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Ladies in waiting.
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Daimyo's wife is one of the main characters in the procession.
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The crowd follows Hanada Masaru.
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The Hakone Daimyo Gyoretsu Procession started in 1935 on the occasion of the Yumoto Expo. Except for the war years in the 1940s, this festival has been held annually.
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You hear, "Shitaaaa-niii, shitaaaa-niiii" (Go down, go down!) by the tsuyu-harai dew sweepers who lead the way to tell people to clear the way and bow in respect. 下ニー 下ニー
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These men are the luggage carriers carrying the hasami-bako boxes containing clothing and other necessities. Hakone Daimyo Gyoretsu. 挟み箱
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Hakone Daimyo Gyoretsu Procession on Nov. 3
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These are honor guards who carry feather-topped keyari poles and toss them to each other. In the old days, they did this when entering the lodging town. 毛槍
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Lead car
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The procession is led by this guide car.
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Daimyo's palanquin, however, I don't think anyone was in it. They never opened it.
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It's quite a long procession route so it's not that crowded much of the way.
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About 80 of the costumers are volunteers recruited from the general public. Women volunteers become ladies-in-waiting.
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