Image search results - "history"
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Ritto History Museum, accessible by bus from Kusatsu Station. 栗東歴史民俗博物館 MAP
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Ritto History Museum, stone buddha replica. 栗東歴史民俗博物館
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Ritto History Museum 栗東歴史民俗博物館
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Ritto History Museum 栗東歴史民俗博物館
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Ritto History Museum's buddha statues 栗東歴史民俗博物館
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Ritto History Museum 栗東歴史民俗博物館
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Ritto History Museum's minka home on display.
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Ritto History Museum's minka home on display.
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Ritto History Museum's minka home on display.
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Setagaya Museum of History is near the Daikan Yashiki.
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Inside the Setagaya Museum of History.
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Portrait of Lord Ii Naosuke, Tokugawa shogunate's chief minister. He was the lord of Hikone Castle in Shiga (Omi) Prefecture.
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The Ii Clan possessed a major part of Setagaya after it was given to them by Shogun Tokugawa Iemitsu.
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Naosuke was assassinated in Tokyo.
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Naosuke was assassinated in Tokyo.
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Nagahama Castle (reconstructed) is a lakeside castle within Hokoen Park near Nagahama Station. This is the entrance to the park. 豊公園 MAP
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The original castle was built by Toyotomi Hideyoshi in the 16th century who lived in Nagahama Castle until 1582. Lord Yamauchi Kazutoyo later lived in Nagahama Castle.
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The current castle tower was reconstructed in 1983. It serves as a local history museum.
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In April, numerous cherry trees around the castle in Hokoen Park bloom spectacularly. The best time to visit Nagahama Castle.
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Nagahama Castle, Shiga
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Nagahama Castle tower, local history museum.
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Inside Nagahama Castle, a local history museum.
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Model of castle construction.
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Old map of Nagahama Castle. There were many moats and canals.
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Top floor of castle.
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Yoshida Shoin History Museum is also within the shrine grounds. 吉田松蔭歴史館
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Yoshida Shoin's family tree.
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Yoshida Shoin's family when he was a child. (Sugi family)
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Yoshida Shoin with his brother and father.
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Shoin listening to a lecture at the school that hr would later take over.
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Teacher, Mori clan head.
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Yoshida Shoin studying.
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Shoin enters Sakuma Shozan school.
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Commodore Perry's USS Powhatan flagship.
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Commodore Perry's troops.
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Yoshida Shoin riding on a boat to Commodore Perry's USS Powhatan flagship to try and stowaway to America.
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About the Ansei Purge.
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Shoin confined.
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Shoin imprisoned.
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Shoin to be executed. (The museum does not show the decapitation.)
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Historical figures from Choshu (Yamaguchi).
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Leaving Shoin Shrine.
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Sign for Oichi-no-Sato, a complex consisting of a public library and folk history museums. Named after Ichi, the wife of Lord Azai Nagamasa who resided at Odani Castle. She was also the younger sister of warlord Oda Nobunaga.
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Oichi or Ichi (1547–1583) gave birth to three daughters who associated with famous men. They were Chacha (Toyotomi Hideyoshi's concubine), Hatsu (married Kyogoku Takatsugu), and Ogo (married Tokugawa Hidetada).
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Map of Oichi-no-Sato. The biggest building on the left is the Azai Public Library. If you don't have a car, catch the Kokoku Bus (Takayama Route) at Nagahama Station and get off at Plaza Fukura no Mori-mae (プラザふくらの森前). Walk 10 min.
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Oichi-no-Sato includes Azai Public Library on the left. Its entrance looks like a castle gate. Address: Oyoricho 528, Nagahama. 大依町 Phone: 0749-74-0101 浅井図書館
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Within Oichi-no-Sato is the Azai Folk History Museum, a small complex of history museums.
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Walk past the library and you come to the gate of the Azai Folk History Museum. Admission 300 yen. Open 9 am to 5 pm, closed Mon. (open if a national holiday) and the day after a national holiday.
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Entrance to Azai Folk History Museum.
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Azai Folk History Museum has a few buildings around an iris pond.
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About the Battle of Anegawa.
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On the left is this modern structure called the Folk Studies Museum or Kyodo Gakushu-kan. It centers on the history of Odani Castle and three generations of the Azai Clan. 郷土学習館
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In the rear is the thatch-roofed Shichirinkan 七りん館
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The Azai Folk History Museum (Azai Rekishi Minzoku Shiryokan) has two large thatched-roof houses. This one is called Itohime no Yakata which shows Azai's silk production history. 糸姫の館 MAP
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Itohime no Yakata
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Folk Studies Museum or Kyodo Gakushu-kan. It centers on the history of Odani Castle and three generations of the Azai Clan. 郷土学習館
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Entrance to Folk Studies Museum.
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Video room explaining the Battle of Anegawa River.
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Video screening room explaining the Battle of Anegawa River.
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Model of Odani Castle on Mt. Odani.
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Model of Odani Castle.
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Exhibits about the Battle of Anegawa River.
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Order written by Toyotomi Hideyoshi to award any Shizugatake residents a reward for killing his enemy.
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Letter from Ishida Mitsunari.
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Thank you letter from Azai Nagamasa to a temple for their cooperation in civil construction work.
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Armor worn around the belly by low-ranking samurai to protect against spears and swords. Supposedly used in the Battle of Anegawa.
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Azai Nagamasa, wife Oichi, son Manpukumaru (left), Chacha in the middle, Hatsu on the right, and Go in Oichi's arms.
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Depiction of Oichi and her daughters being allowed to escape Odani Castle while it was under attack by Oda Nobunaga in 1573.
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Depiction of Oichi and her three daughters being allowed to escape Odani Castle while it was under attack by Oda Nobunaga in 1573.
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Oichi and daughter Chacha, Hatsu, and Go were led to safety by Fujikake Nagakatsu, a retainer of Oda Nobunaga. He took them to Gifu Castle.
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A few years before the attack, Fujikake Nagakatsu, a retainer of Oda Nobunaga, had been assigned to Odani Castle to look after Nobunaga's sister Oichi. 藤懸永勝
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About the castle gate.
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Right after their escape from Odani Castle, Oichi and her three daughters went to a nearby temple in Nagahama whose priest was Nagamasa's older sister. The priest hid the three girls in her robes when Nobunaga's men arrived.It is not known for sure where Oichi and the Azai sisters escaped to. This is only one supposition.
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Folding fan supposedly used by Oichi.
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This folding panel greets you with a portrait of Lord Azai Nagamasa and wife Ichi.
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Model of Odani Castle on a mountaintop.
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More exhibits about local history.
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Portrait panels of Nagamasa, Ichi, and their three daughters.
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Ichi or Oichi, wife of Azai Nagamasa.
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Lord Azai Nagamasa
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Map of the Battle of Anegawa where Lord Azai Nagamasa fought against Tokugawa Ieyasu and Oda Nobunaga in 1570.
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Second floor of the museum with a fake stone castle gate.
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Relics from Odani Castle
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Fan said to have belonged to Ichi.
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Blacksmith-related materials.
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Photo of an unusual ax.
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Inside Shichirinkan, a former blacksmith's house from the 19th century. 七りん館
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When I visited in Feb. 2009, there was an exhibit showing artifacts of a local Okonai Festival (held in various locations during Jan. to March to pray for a good harvest).
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Feast for Okonai Festival.
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Food for Okonai Festival.
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Kitchen.
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Wooden bathtub
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How they bathed in the bathtub.
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Near the entrance was the wooden bath.
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Urinal
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Blacksmith's shop
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Inside Blacksmith's shop.
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This is Itohime no Yakata which shows Azai's silk production history. 糸姫の館
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Inside Itohime no Yakata.
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Large exhibition rooms.
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Products which use silk threads made in Azai. They were mainly used for the strings of string instruments such as the koto, samisen, and biwa lute.
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Koto strings made of Azai silk threads. Numerous silk threads are twisted together to make a koto string.
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Biwa strings
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Biwa lute
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Silk cocoons.
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Room with a hearth.
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Silk threads.
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Weaver
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Model of silkworm racks.
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A mannequin spinning silk thread.
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Model of silkworm racks.
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Silk thread
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Iris pond
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Yo-soro Fishing History Museum, 5 min. by taxi from JR Otsuko Station. Pretty large facility with local fishing-related exhibits. 北茨城市漁業歴史 資料館「よう・そろー」
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Welcome mat saying "Yo-soro" which means "Go ahead" for boat navigation.
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In Kita-Ibaraki, the Yo-soro Fishing History Museum's centerpiece exhibit is this wooden boat (祭事船) used in the Hitachi-Otsu Ofune Matsuri boat festival held every 5 years (常陸大津御船祭り).
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It's the city's grandest festival and very unique because this boat is pulled on city streets instead of sailing on the water.
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About 500 people drag this boat along a 1,200-meter route of paved streets. They lay wooden beams on the road for the boat to traverse on.
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The boat, with shrine priests and musicians aboard, is rocked side to side as it is dragged on the street for several hours. This festival will be held on May 2nd–3rd, 2019. At least 160,000 spectators are expected to see it.
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The museum also has display panels showing the tsunami damage suffered by Kita-Ibaraki. Ibaraki Prefecture, being on the southern fringe of the Tohoku Region, suffered major earthquake and tsunami damage in March 2011.Kita-Ibaraki being closest to the Tohoku Region on the coast, suffered the most in Ibaraki Prefecture. The flat sandy beaches were overcome by the tsunami (second wave around 5 meters high) that caused much damage to Kita-Ibaraki. This is the Hirakata area after the tsunami. Besides major damage along the coast, the interior areas had numerous landslides, collapsed walls, and damaged roads due to the quake.
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Ten people in Kita-Ibaraki died directly or indirectly due to the tsunami/earthquake and 186 injured. Over 8,000 homes in Kita-Ibaraki were damaged and up to 5,000 people had to evacuate to emergency shelters.These numbers pale in comparison to the three Tohoku prefectures, so Ibaraki doesn't get much attention with regard to 3-11, although the Emperor and Empress did visit Kita-Ibaraki in late April 2011.
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Display of all the fishes caught in Kita-Ibaraki.
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Yo-soro Museum also has this kami-shibai storytelling room. Story about British whalers who landed on Otsuhama beach in Kita-Ibaraki in May 1824 in search of food and water.It was during the time Japan largely prohibited contact with foreigners. By the 1800s, whaling ships from the West were frequently seen off the coast of Japan. In May 1824, multiple British whaling ships appeared off the coast of Kita-Ibaraki.
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The crew suffered from scurvy due to the lack of vitamin C. They needed water and vegetables so 12 British whalers landed on Otsuhama beach in Kita-Ibaraki. They were willing to barter guns, spears, gold, etc., as payment. (大津浜事件)
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However, the 12 whalers were instead held captive by the local samurai. They were tied to plum trees or confined to caves. More British ships arrived seeking the release of the prisoners.Also, the Mito Clan also brought in neighboring clans like the Taira Clan as reinforcement for a potential battle. Cannons were pointed at each other, but a conflict was averted by giving the whalers the water and food that sent them along their way away from Japan. In return, the whalers gave guns, spears, felt, gold, and silver as payment and had to promise not to approach Japan again.
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Date is pronounced "DAH-tay." The city of 37,000 was founded in 1870 by a samurai named Date Kunishige and his vassals and citizens who migrated from Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture. Thus, you will find occasional references to the samurai in Date.
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Date Rekishi no Mori is a large park with various public facilities including a Japanese garden. The park was completed in 2000 after about 11 years of construction. This is the castle-like Otemon Gate built when the Crown Prince got married in 1993.
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Although the park is designed like a castle grounds with a castle wall and moat, it is not the site of any former castle.
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The park includes a culture center, public library, sports ground, and the Kaitaku Kinenkan museum.
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Reconstructed castle wall and cherry blossoms.
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The park has a number of buildings. This is the tourist gift shop and hands-on workshop for swordmaking and fabric dyeing.
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Map of Date Rekishi no Mori. Various festivals and events are also held in the park. Unfortunately, I didn't have time to see everything in the park.
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Rest House
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Rest House windows
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Entrance to the swordsmith and fabric dyeing workshop. You can see a swordsmith making a sword. You have to check when he's doing it though. Free admission. Web site 黎明観
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Kannon Folk History Museum (Kannon no Sato Rekishi Minzoku Shiryokan) has various exhibits about Kannon and the town's historical persons. 観音の里歴史民俗資料館 MAP
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Miyao Tomiko Literature Museum. Admission 120 yen. Unfortunately, I didn't have time to enter it. 宮尾登美子文学記念館
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Inside Kannon Folk History Museum, which is near Doganji and 10-min. walk from Takatsuki Station. The museum opened in 1984. Admission 250 yen. Museum hours 9 am - 4:30 pm. Closed Mon., the day after national holidays, and year end/New Year's.
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One of the main attractions of the park is the Geihinkan State Guesthouse. Cherry blossoms were in full bloom.
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Geihinkan Guesthouse and cherry blossoms. 迎賓館
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Plum blossoms and cherry blossoms in the background, blooming at the same time.
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Cherry blossoms next to the Geihinkan were beautiful in early May.
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Geihinkan Guesthouse in Date Rekishi no Mori park, Hokkaido. Two-story wooden structure built in 1892 during the Meiji Period. 迎賓館
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The Geihinkan was used to receive high-ranking government officials visiting Date to inspect the development of the town. 迎賓館
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On display on the first floor were samurai armor.
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Samurai armor displayed on the first floor veranda of the Geihinkan.
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Samurai armor displayed on the first floor veranda of the Geihinkan.
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Samurai armor displayed on the first floor veranda of the Geihinkan.
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Samurai armor displayed on the first floor veranda of the Geihinkan.
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Western-style room inside the Geihinkan.
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Japanese-style room on 2nd floor of the Geihinkan.
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2nd floor of the Geihinkan.
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2nd floor of the Geihinkan.
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2nd floor corridor of the Geihinkan.
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Near the Geihinkan is the Date Kaitaku Kinenkan Museum (opened in 1958) displaying swords, lacquerware, etc., from the Date samurai clan, donated to the city by the Date family. Photography is not allowed inside the museum. Closed Dec.-Feb. 伊達市開
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Behind the Date Kaitaku Kinenkan Museum is the former Mitobe house on display. It is a typical house of the first settlers of Date, Hokkaido. Based on Sendai-style (Miyagi Pref.) architecture. Important Cultural Property. 旧三戸部家住宅
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Inside Mitobe house. Web site 旧三戸部家住宅
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Inside Mitobe house with a hearth.
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The Yokozuna Kitanoumi Ki'nenkan or Memorial Hall looks like a miniature version of the Ryogoku Kokugikan sumo arena in Tokyo. Although it's near Lake Toya, it's off the main tourist road. There is a bus stop nearby, but I rented a bicycle.
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Front of the Yokozuna Kitanoumi Memorial Hall, dedicated to Sobetsu's most famous son. Yokozuna Kitanoumi was one of sumo's greatest grand champions in modern times. "Kitanoumi" means "Lake of the North," and this refers to Lak
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Today, Kitanoumi is a stablemaster and the chairman of the Japan Sumo Association. The front entrance of the Yokozuna Kitanoumi Memorial Hall which opened in May 1991..
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Right outside the Yokozuna Kitanoumi Memorial Hall are sumo banners. From left to right, they read, "Kitanoumi Stable," "Yokozuna Kitanoumi Memorial Hall," and "Sobetsu History Museum."
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This is what you first see. Photos of Kitanoumi growing up in Sobetsu town. Looks like any ordinary kid. Admission is 250 yen for adults, 100 yen for kids. Open 9 am to 5 pm, closed Jan. 1.
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Little Kitanoumi. He was born in May 1953 in Sobetsu-cho town which includes the eastern shore of Lake Toya (Toyako). At age 13, he moved to Tokyo and entered the Mihogaseki Stable.
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Kitanoumi as a young sumo wrestler. Even as Ozeki, he already had the aura of a Yokozuna. He had an ideal sumo physique, quiet dignity, and awesome sumo technique and power. He was a shoo-in to be a yokozuna.
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In July 1974, he became the youngest sumo wrestler to be promoted to Yokozuna at age 21. His 18-year sumo career included 24 tournament championships.
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This is the main room of the Kitanoumi Memorial Hall. It includes half of a sumo ring (dohyo) with a mannequin.
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The sumo ring is not made of real dirt.
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Top row has miniature versions of the tournament champion portraits awarded to the wrestler and hung in the Ryogoku Kokugikan. Bottom row of photos show his best career moments.
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Some photos are captioned with memorable quotes by Kitanoumi.
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The mannequin is a slightly larger-than-life likeness of Yokozuna Kitanoumi performing the Yokozuna Dohyo-iri (ring-entering ceremony). Yokozuna Kitanoumi Memorial Hall, Sobetsu, Hokkaido
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Above is an actual tournament champion giant portrait which once hung in the Kokugikan.
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He is doing the Unryu-style dohyo-iri.
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It sort of looks like Kitanoumi...
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Actual-size ringside seats are also on display.
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It looks kind of strange without his two attendants, the sword bearer and dew sweeper...
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Kitanoumi's kesho mawashi set (ceremonial apron) on display.
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His Yokozuna "tsuna" rope belt.
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And some of his trophies. Besides the Emperor's Cup (not displayed), the tournament champion receives numerous trophies and awards from various organizations and countries.
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Kitanoumi-beya stable sign at top, and various award certificates.
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Award from Czechoslovakia in 1978.
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Scale model of a sumo drum tower
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Tournament champion portrait. Kitanoumi retired in Jan. 1985 and started his own Kitanoumi Stable. In 2002, he became chairman of the Japan Sumo Association. We missed Kitanoumi, but another great Yokozuna from Hokkaido, Chiyonofuji, filled the void.
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Photos of other tournament champions. Six official 15-day sumo tournaments are held every year in Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya, and Fukuoka.
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Referee costumes in the showcase.
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Sacred offerings buried in the dohyo before each tournament.
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The other half of the building is the Sobetsu History Museum. This panel shows how Lake Toya was formed.
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Typical abode of early Hokkaido settlers who first came to this area in 1879.
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Artifacts of early Hokkaido settlers.
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Artifacts from the defunct local Iburi rail line discontinued in 1986. There was a Sobetsu Station.
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Power generation machinery
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Natural history exhibit
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Local wildlife exhibit, including the Ezo deer.
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Kitanoumi souvenirs for sale.
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The Shunan City Museum of Art and History is a nice, modern museum. A short bus ride from JR Tokuyama Station.
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Entrance to Shunan City Museum of Art and History. Admission 200 yen.
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Lobby of Shunan City Museum of Art and History.
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Second floor of Shunan City Museum of Art and History.
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Shunan Museum of Art and History has a large exhibition room dedicated to photographer Tadahiko Hayashi (1918-1990).
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Tadahiko Hayashi was from Tokuyama and his family donated all his photos and camera equipment to this museum.
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