Image search results - "day"
001_2527.jpg
From late April to early May, five long strings of giant carp streamers swim in the air high above the Sagami River in Sagamihara, Kanagawa. This event was started in 1988.
002_2542.jpg
There are five rows of streamers. In Japan, the koi carp is regarded as a symbol of valiant manhood because it swims up the river against the rapids.
003_2518.jpg
The cable length is 250 meters and 13mmm thick. There are about 1,200 carp streamers. They are reused every year and donated by local families. (I also noticed a few advertising carps.)
004_0065.jpg
005_9922.jpg
006_9946.jpg
Sagami River Koi-nobori
007_9990.jpg
008_9952.jpg
009_9987.jpg
010_9982.jpg
The longest carp is 10 meters.
011_9981.jpg
Koi-nobori carp streamers over Sagami River. Also see the video at YouTube.
012_9916.jpg
Along the river were food stalls.
013_9915.jpg
Festival site
014_2579.jpg
Cable anchor
015_2580.jpg
Statistics
200501.jpg
Dec. 2004 - Imperial Palace VisitEmperor Akihito waves to the flag-waving crowd at the Imperial Palace on Dec. 23, 2004, his birthday and a national holiday. A similar spectacle also takes place on Jan. 2.

Dec. 23 and Jan. 2 are the only two days when the general public is allowed to enter the palace to greet the Emperor and his family. From left to right is Princess Nori, the Crown Prince, the Emperor, the Empress, and Prince and Princess Akishino. Crown Princess Masako did not appear.

Before we got to see the Emperor and his family behind bullet-proof glass, we stood in line for about 2 hours, went through a bag inspection, body frisking, and crossed the famous Nijubashi Bridge.

We waited 30 min. more in the plaza, then the Emperor and his family appeared right on time at 10:20 am. People waved the paper flags that had been distributed and cheered "banzai!" When the Emperor spoke, the crowd immediately fell silent. He spoke for only about a minute, thanking us for celebrating his birthday and mentioning this past year's numerous natural disasters.

After he finished, everyone waved the flags again and cheered. The Imperial family waved back and soon disappeared behind the sliding paper doors. They were on the balcony for a whole THREE minutes. I thought they would stay there for at least 10 min. Barely had time to mount my telephoto lens.

We were then promptly herded to the exit to make room for the next horde of people waiting to see the Emperor who appeared two more times that day. I was surprised to see quite a few foreigners, including four guys in a Santa Claus suit.

Cover photo and page design: © Philbert Ono

See more photos of my Imperial Palace Visit.

JAPANESE:

一般参賀
2004年12月23日の天皇誕生日に初めて一般参賀のため皇居へ。朝8時過ぎから2時間ぐらい並んで待ってやっとこの広場で天皇陛下が現れました。でも天皇一家のお出ましはたった3分だけで終わった。あまり早くてなかなか写真を撮れませんでした。ちょっとがっかり。(雅子さまが出なかったことも残念。)

二重橋を渡る前に手荷物の拝見(飲食が禁止で飲料を捨てた)とボディチェック。紙の旗は皆に配られた。外国人も結構来ていました。(サンタクロース姿の人も。)お正月にいつも東京にいないため今回天皇誕生日にした。

昭和天皇がまだ生きているうちに参賀したかったなー。

写真と表紙デザイン:© Philbert Ono

もっとの一般参賀の写真はここ 一般参賀の写真はここ。
ah200-20100408_7656.jpg
Like most major Buddhist temples, Sensoji temple in Asakusa holds its Hanamatsuri to mark Buddha's birthday on April 8. Hana Matsuri sign at Kaminarimon Gate.
ah201-20100408_7408.jpg
A symbol of Hanamatsuri (literally "flower festival") is the white elephant which is paraded around. This one stands ready at Kaminarimon Gate. It has a baby Buddha statue on top.
ah202-20100408_7410.jpg
When the Buddha was born, he walked seven steps and said, "I am my own Lord through Heaven and Earth," and pointed one hand to Heaven and the other to Earth.
ah203-20100408_7414.jpg
Children from the local kindergarten walk toward Kaminarimon Gate from where they will pull the white elephant.
ah204-20100408_7417.jpg
Every April 8, if it's a nice day, I try to visit a different temple in Japan to see Hanamatsuri. This year I decided to see it in Asakusa.
ah205-20100408_7426.jpg
Sensoji temple was renovating its roof so it is covered with scaffolding (painted with a gold dragon). Out front is the Hanami-do where you can pour sweet tea over the baby Buddha.
ah206-20100408_7439.jpg
People crowd around the flower-decorated Hanami-do, the little hall with the baby Buddha.
ah207-20100408_7443.jpg
ah208-20100408_7431.jpg
People pour sweet tea over the baby Buddha. He points one finger to Heaven. 花御堂
ah209-20100408_7427.jpg
Sweet tea is poured over a statue of a baby buddha. According to legend, sweet rain (or perfumed water) fell when the Buddha was born.
ah210-20100408_7629.jpg
Inside Sensoji temple was another Hanami-do with a baby Buddha. 花御堂
ah211-20100408_7630.jpg
Anyone can pour the sweet tea over the baby Buddha for free.
ah212-20100408_7450.jpg
The little Hanamatsuri parade went through Nakamise and arrived at Sensoji with the white elephant in tow.
ah213-20100408_7452.jpg
Asakusa Hana Matsuri 花まつり
ah214-20100408_7453.jpg
In front of Sensoji temple, they held a Hana Matsuri ceremony with the kindergarten kids.
ah215-20100408_7463.jpg
They sang a few songs. Their parents toting video camcorders recorded the event.
ah216-20100408_7540.jpg
ah217-20100408_7511.jpg
Asakusa: White elephant is usually present during Hanamatsuri. On the day before the Buddha's mother Queen Maya gave birth, she dreamed that a white elephant entered her womb.
ah218-20100408_7547.jpg
ah219-20100408_7532.jpg
Kids pour sweet tea over the baby Buddha during the Hanamatsuri ceremony.
ah220-20100408_7573.jpg
ah221-20100408_7562.jpg
Hanamatsuri at Sensoji temple in Asakusa.
ah222-20100408_7584.jpg
Baby Buddha on the white elephant.
ah223-20100408_7617.jpg
White elephant and the pagoda at Sensoji temple, Asakusa on Buddha's birthday called Hanamatsuri.
ah224-20100408_7614.jpg
After the ceremony, they served free sweet tea. 甘茶
ah225-20100408_7597.jpg
Ama-cha sweet tea for everyone. 甘茶
ah226-20100408_7650.jpg
An extra treat was free flowers (orchids). They gave out a large number of these flowers.
ah227-20100408_7609.jpg
ah228-20100408_7762.jpg
The flowers were made in Thailand.
ah229-20100408_7763.jpg
Pretty orchid. It had a water capsule at the end of the stem. At the top were buds which later bloomed. This flower lasted me well over a month before it withered.
ah230-20100408_7422.jpg
Hanamatsuri sign
ah231-20100408_7423.jpg
About Hanamatsuri in Japanese.
at020-20090101_0001.jpg
I always visit a different shrine on New Year's Day, so for 2009, I visited Atsuta Jingu Shrine in Nagoya. JR Atsuta Station on the Tokaido Line is one train station near Atsuta Jingu Shrine. JR熱田駅
at021-20090101_0003.jpg
Shopping arcade on the way to the shrine from Atsuta Station.
at022-20090101_0005.jpg
Another train station near Atsuta Shrine is Meitetsu Jingumae Station (this is closer than Atsuta Station). 名鉄神宮前駅
at023-20090101_0006.jpg
The road in front of Meitetsu Jingumae Station was closed to traffic, allowing pedestrians to get to Atsuta Shrine on New Year's Day.
at024-20090101_0008.jpg
Atsuta Jingu is one of Japan's most important shrines as it enshrines one of the three Imperial Regalia of Japan, the sacred (and perhaps legendary) sword called Kusanagi-no-Tsurugi ("Grass Cutting Sword"). 草薙の剣
at025-20090101_0013.jpg
Many food stalls line the way to the shrine on New Year's Day.
at026-20090101_0014.jpg
One normal gate was closed and we all had to enter through the East Gate.
at027-20090101_0016.jpg
The East torii gate of Atsuta Jingu Shrine, made of wood. Atsuta Jingu worships Atsuta-no-Ookami or Amaterasu-Omikami, the Sun Goddess represented by Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, the sacred sword.
at028-20090101_0018.jpg
This is where the crowd begins on New Year's Day. The shrine also worships four other deities: Susanoo-no-mikoto, Yamato-Takeru-no-Mikoto, and Takeinadane-no-Mikoto and Miyasuhime-no-Mikoto, the parents of the Owari natives (Nagoya area).
at029-20090101_0021.jpg
Banner read "Happy New Year."
at030-20090101_0025.jpg
Atsuta Shrine was established about 1900 years ago. In the centuries past, the shrine has been patronized by major historical figures such as Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and the Tokugawa shoguns (Ieyasu was originally from this area).
at031-20090101_0033.jpg
We soon hit a bottleneck where we had to wait a while as we slowly got nearer to the shrine.
at032-20090101_0037.jpg
We got to the wash fountain to purify ourselves.
at033-20090101_0046.jpg
From the ladle, pour the water into your hand and sip the water to purify yourself before visiting the shrine. This was a most crowded place.
at034-20090101_0043.jpg
Wash fountain
at035-20090101_0050.jpg
The crowd thickens and it was stop and go, repeatedly.
at036-20090101_0052.jpg
Barrels of sake.
at037-20090101_0055.jpg
We stand still.
at038-20090101_0056.jpg
We want to go straight.
at039-20090101_0059.jpg
Finally, the shrine is in sight.
at040-20090101_0062.jpg
Approaching the final torii.
at041-20090101_0075.jpg
The police were holding back the crowd at regular intervals before they could enter the shrine's worship area.
at042-20090101_0063.jpg
Now we stand in line to pray before the shrine.
at043-20090101_0147.jpg
Standing in line to pray.
at044-20090101_0065.jpg
at045-20090101_0178.jpg
Getting closer.
at046-20090101_0103.jpg
at047-20090101_0108.jpg
This is what we wanted to see. The offertory pit where people throw their money in front of the Hongu main shrine. 本宮
at048-20090101_0104.jpg
New Year's prayers at Atsuta Jingu Shrine on Jan. 1.
at049-20090101_0094.jpg
at050-20090101_0096.jpg
Coins, bills, gift certificates, and even wallets were thrown in here.
at051-20090101_0133.jpg
at052-20090101_0089.jpg
at053-20090101_0111.jpg
The shrine's bank will love to count all this money. It must be their favorite time of year.
at054-20090101_0120.jpg
I wonder how much money these wallets contain.
at055-20090101_0140.jpg
View of the money pit as seen from the shrine. This is still quite small compared to Meiji Shrine in Tokyo on New Year's Day. Less crowded too.
at056-20090101_0139.jpg
Atsuta Jingu Shrine's Hongu main shrine. For 1,000 yen, they let you in here to pray. The architecture and layout are almost the same as the Ise Grand Shrines in Mie Pref. Rebuilt in 1955. I wonder if the sacred sword is in there.
at057-20090101_0143.jpg
They also give you a small dish and sake served by a shrine maiden as you exit.
at057a-20090210_3017.jpg
This is what we received for 1,000 yen. Some sweets as well. It also included a tea session. (See below.)
at058-20090101_0151.jpg
Shrine amulets were selling like crazy.
at059-20090101_0185.jpg
Shrines are in the business of selling good fortune and hope.
at060-20090101_0196.jpg
Votive tablets and other trinkets.
at061-20090101_0199.jpg
at062-20090101_0159.jpg
at063-20090101_0197.jpg
Description of various amulets in English.
at064-20090101_0153.jpg
at065-20090101_0173.jpg
at066-20090101_0205.jpg
at067-20090101_0207.jpg
Omikuji fortune paper.
at068-20090101_0209.jpg
Built in 1686 by Shogun Tsunayoshi, this is Nishi-gakusho, one of the few shrine buildings remaining from before the Meiji Period. Dances and other ceremonies are held here. 西楽所
at069-20090101_0214.jpg
Remnant of the Nobunaga-bei, a roofed mud wall donated to the shrine in 1560 by Oda Nobunaga in gratitude for his victory at the Battle of Okehazama.
at070-20090101_0212.jpg
Follow the sign to exit or to see other shrine buildings.
at071-20090101_0217.jpg
Homotsukan Treasure Hall houses and exhibits the shrine's valuable artifacts, including Important Cultural Properties and a National Treasure (a dagger). Many people donated stuff to the shrine, especially swords. 宝物館
at072-20090101_0219.jpg
Behind and attached to the Homotsukan Treasure Hall is the Bunkaden Culture Hall where they held a tea session. People form a long line as they wait to enter the Bunkaden. The tea was included in the 1,000 yen I paid to see the inner shrine.
at073-20090101_0236.jpg
This is the Bunkaden Culture Hall which is behind and attached to the Treasure Hall. This is where they held the tea session.
at074-20090101_0235.jpg
Inside the Bunkaden Culture Hall for tea.
at075-20090101_0234.jpg
The stage was appropriate for New Year's.
at076-20090101_0227.jpg
There was no ceremony. We just sat and were served tea and sweet.
at077-20090101_0228.jpg
A sweet confection to eat with the matcha tea.
at078-20090101_0230.jpg
The shrine maidens came around to serve the tea and sweet.
at079-20090101_0232.jpg
My bowl of matcha green tea. After we consumed the tea, we just left. The shrines also has many other buildings, but it was too crowded for me to see them all this day. I was too tired walk around more.
bt300-20180505_8381.jpg
The tower is 333 meters high, with two observatories. The lower one, called the Main Deck, is 150 meters high. The higher one, the Top Deck, is 250 meters up.
bt301-20180505_8368.jpg
Tokyo Tower has a number of evening illumination themes. This is the "Diamond Veil" illumination.
bt302-20180505_8391.jpg
bt303-20180505_8393.jpg
bt304-20180505_8366.jpg
In early May for Children's Day, Tokyo Tower was festooned with colorful koinobori carp streamers.
bt305-20180505_8039.jpg
bt306-20180505_8349.jpg
bt307-20180505_8060.jpg
bt308-20180505_8062.jpg
Tokyo Tower with koinobori carp streamers in early May.
bt309-20180505_8337.jpg
Tokyo Tower with koinobori carp streamers in early May.
bt310-20180505_8046.jpg
bt311-20180505_8346.jpg
bt312-20180505_8056.jpg
bt313-20180505_8058.jpg
bt314-20180505_8144.jpg
bt315-20180505_8202.jpg
bt316-20180505_8196.jpg
bt317-20180505_8190.jpg
Tokyo Tower with koinobori carp streamers in early May.
bt318-20180505_8094.jpg
A real crowd pleaser. Beautiful and photogenic.
bt319-20180505_8096.jpg
bt320-20180505_8098.jpg
bt321-20180505_8106.jpg
bt322-20180505_8207.jpg
bt323-20180505_8160.jpg
Tokyo Tower with koinobori carp streamers in early May.
bt324-20180505_8045.jpg
bt325-20180505_8049.jpg
bt326-20180505_8188.jpg
bt327-20180505_8338.jpg
bt328-20180505_8344.jpg
bt329-20180505_8083.jpg
bt330-20180505_8087.jpg
bt331-20180505_8194.jpg
bt332-20180505_8133.jpg
bt333-20180505_8162.jpg
bt334-20180505_8125.jpg
bt335-20180505_8179.jpg
bt336-20180505_8206.jpg
bt337-20180505_8359.jpg
bt338-20180505_8041.jpg
bt339-20180505_8347.jpg
bt400-20180505_8211.jpg
Elevator for the Main Deck.
bt401-20180505_8212.jpg
Ticket for the Main Deck.
bt402-20180505_8213.jpg
It wasn't a long wait for the elevator.
bt403-20180505_8216.jpg
Inside the elevator.
bt404-20180505_8221.jpg
Main Deck had a cherry blossom-theme projection mapping on the windows.
bt405-20180505_8222.jpg
bt406-20180505_8223.jpg
bt407-20180505_8232.jpg
bt408-20180505_8234.jpg
bt409-20180505_8243.jpg
bt410-20180505_8236.jpg
bt411-20180505_8227.jpg
bt412-20180505_8239.jpg
Main Deck at Tokyo Tower. Despite the opening of Tokyo Skytree, Tokyo Tower is still holding its own with innovative attractions.
bt413-20180505_8244.jpg
Tourists loved to pose with the projection mapping imagery.
bt414-20180505_8250.jpg
bt415-20180505_8274.jpg
Long line for the down elevators.
bt416-20180505_8268.jpg
Tokyo Tower celebrating its 60th anniversary in 2018.
bt417-20180505_8271.jpg
bt418-20180505_8270.jpg
bt419-20180505_8289.jpg
bt420-20180505_8291.jpg
bt421-20180505_8292.jpg
Restaurant on the Main Deck.
bt422-20180505_8298.jpg
End of the line on the Main Deck for the Down elevator.
bt423-20180505_8310.jpg
1st floor elevator.
bt424-20180505_8312.jpg
Near the elevators on the 1st floor is this exhibition space.
bt425-20180505_8314.jpg
bt426-20180505_8316.jpg
A mysterious baseball was found on the top of Tokyo Tower.
bt427-20180505_8333.jpg
bt428-20180505_8334.jpg
IMG_2528.jpg
Dec. 23, 2004 at 8:30 am: Across the street from the Imperial Palace. Dec. 23 and Jan. 2 are the only two days when the general public is allowed to enter the palace to greet the Emperor and his family.A visit to the Imperial Palace by the general public is called "ippan sanga" in Japanese (一般参賀).

On the Emperor's birthday, the Imperial Palace can be entered only at certain locations. You have to find out where they are and stand in line there. Just go near the Imperial Palace and ask a policeman where you can stand in line. You otherwise cannot enter the grounds. The huge, graveled plaza where you can see Nijubashi Bridge is closed off by police.

While standing in line here, we received free paper Japanese flags.
IMG_2529.jpg
Line behind
IMG_2531.jpg
8:37 am: We crossed the street to enter Imperial Palace grounds
IMG_2538.jpg
Bag checkpoint ahead. They inspected all our bags. Note that they do not allow any drinks (not even water) to be taken into the palace. You will have to dump it in the trash can they provide.
IMG_2539.jpg
8:40 am: Bag check
IMG_2542.jpg
Body inspection up ahead. They frisked the body and also used a metal detector as well. I had to explain that the hump in my pants pocket was a wallet and cell phone. He believed me since I have an honest-looking face.1 comments
IMG_2544.jpg
8:43 am: Passed body check and walking to waiting line. After seeing these coned lanes, I was glad that I went early. I don't know if all these lanes were later filled with people, but probably yes.
IMG_2555.jpg
Lining up in line 1
IMG_2557.jpg
Approaching the entrance near Nijubashi Bridge
IMG_2564.jpg
9:20 am: Long line behind. If it's a sunny day, it's sunburn time. We waited here for over 30 min.
IMG_2565.jpg
Merging with another line up ahead
IMG_2571.jpg
9:28 am: Finally walking toward Nijubashi Bridge. There were a lot of men in trench coats gazing at the crowd.
IMG_2573.jpg
Getting closer to the bridge
IMG_2581.jpg
Nijubashi Bridge straight ahead!
IMG_2589.jpg
9:31 am: Crossing the famous Nijubashi Bridge. It turned out to be a completely modern bridge, no sqeaking or anything. 二重橋
IMG_2591.jpg
Right view from Nijubashi Bridge. In the distance, you can see another parallel bridge which leads directly into the inner grounds of the palace. We will cross that bridge too. There is also the castle-like structure called the Fushimi Turret.
IMG_2595.jpg
Left view from Nijubashi Bridge. Everyone knows what the Nijubashi Bridge looks like from outside. Finally, we see what it looks like from the bridge. 二重橋
IMG_2596.jpg
On Nijubashi Bridge heading for the Seimon Gate. 正門
IMG_2602.jpg
Main gate
IMG_2605.jpg
9:33 am: Behind us on Nijubashi Bridge. 二重橋
IMG_2607.jpg
Walking toward the second bridge
IMG_2613.jpg
Out of the main gate. Everything was very orderly, no pushing nor shoving.
IMG_2626.jpg
9:35 am: Walking toward the second bridge. We walked up a slight slope to reach the second, parallel bridge. The Fushimi Turret is in the background.
IMG_2641.jpg
Fushimi Turret. This view of the turret can only be had when you cross the bridge. I never knew what it really looked like until this day. 伏見櫓
IMG_2650.jpg
Fushimi Turret. This view of the turret can only be had when you cross the bridge. I never knew what it really looked like until this day. 伏見櫓
IMG_2655.jpg
9:38 am: Crossing the second bridge. The first Nijubashi Bridge, which we crossed first, is in the distance. Nijubashi means double bridge. 二重橋
IMG_2658.jpg
Nakamon Gate to Imperial Palace 中門
IMG_2661.jpg
9:40 am: Inside the Imperial Palace. This is called the Kyudentotei. It is a large plaza in front of the palace.
IMG_2666.jpg
Kyuden Totei plaza
IMG_2673.jpg
Entrance for state guests. This is where heads of state and other royalty enter this building.
IMG_2674.jpg
Filling up the plaza
IMG_2679.jpg
The center is filled up first. The center is in front of the balcony where the Imperial family will appear. Thus, the earlier you go, the better chance of you standing in front of the balcony.
IMG_2692.jpg
IMG_2694.jpg
Good location
IMG_2695.jpg
9:43 am: Almost front and center
IMG_2696.jpg
People behind fill up the rest of the plaza
IMG_2698.jpg
Behind us. At the very rear below the trees, there is a slightly elevated platform where the news media can take photos. You can see many tripods set up. That's how they are able to photograph the Emperor with the flags waving well below the balcony.
IMG_2706.jpg
Filled on our right
IMG_2710.jpg
9:57 am: Filled on our left. The entire place was full by 10 am. Quite a few foreigners were present as well. Rightists with large flags were also there.
IMG_2719.jpg
10:20 am: The Emperor and Empress appear right on time on his birthday. As soon as they appeared, people waved paper flags and cheered "banzai!" Also see the video at YouTube.It was an amazing spectacle. I always saw it on TV, but this was the first time I saw it in person. I wish I went when Emperor Hirohito was still living.

From left to right is Princess Nori, the Crown Prince, the Emperor, the Empress, and Prince and Princess Akishino. Crown Princess Masako did not appear due to illness.

I also once used this shot for the cover photo on my home page.
IMG_2724.jpg
10:22 am: The Emperor speaks. When the Emperor spoke, the crowd immediately fell silent and all the flags stopped waving. He spoke for only about a minute, thanking us for celebrating his birthday and mentioning this past year's numerous natural disasAfter he finished, everyone waved the flags again and cheered.
IMG_2730.jpg
10:23 am: They wave to the crowd again. From left to right is the Crown Prince, the Emperor, the Empress, and Prince and Princess Akishino.It was very difficult to get a good shot of them since so many flags were in the way. I had to hold the camera overhead above the flags and shoot almost blindly with my telephoto lens. Luckily, I managed to get a few decent closeup shots.
IMG_2733.jpg
The Crown Prince, the Emperor, and the Empress on the Emperor's Birthday. They were on the balcony for a whole THREE minutes. I thought they would stay there for at least 10 min. Barely had time to mount my telephoto lens.
IMG_2736.jpg
10:24 am: After 3 min. on the balcony, they were gone. We waited almost 2 hours for a 3-min. appearance. But I think it's something you should do at least once while in Japan.
IMG_2741.jpg
Even Santa Claus came (from Finland??). I'm told that they might be Finns. (Santa is from Finland.)
IMG_2742.jpg
10:25 am: Clearing out the crowd. We were promptly herded to the exit to make room for the next horde of people waiting to see the Emperor who appeared two more times that day.
IMG_2744.jpg
Japan fans. The sign says, "Downward slope ahead, walk slowly." It's only about 10:30 am, so it's a good time to walk around the Imperial Palace and the East Gardens. Although no flowers are in bloom, you might see autumn leaves.For more info about the Imperial Family and visiting the palace, see the Imperial Household Agency's Web site.
is100-20130101-0458.jpg
Ise-shi Station platform upon arrival on Jan. 1, 2013. Ise Jingu's Geku Outer Shrine is a short walk from this station.
is101-20130101-0459.jpg
Ise-shi Station with kadomatsu New Year's decorations.
is102-20130101-0461.jpg
Bus stop for Naiku Inner Shrine. This is near Ise-shi Station.
is103-20130101-0462.jpg
Inside the bus going to Naiku from Ise-shi Station.
is104-20130101-0463.jpg
Colorful bus at Ise.
is105-20130101-0465.jpg
Bus with motif promoting Ise. Going to worship at Ise Jingu is called "Ise-mairi."
is106-20130101-0464.jpg
is107-20130101-0730.jpg
Map of Ise Jingu's Naiku Shrine. First you cross Uji Bridge.
is108-20130101-0467.jpg
Torii gate at Uji Bridge. Very crowded with New Year's worshippers going for hatsumode prayers.
is109-20130101-0469.jpg
Ise Jingu Shrine's Naiku (Inner Shrine) is the main and most popular shrine at Ise. The shrine is rebuilt every 20 years and 2013 will mark the completion of the new shrine to replace the old one built in 1993.
is110-20130101-0471.jpg
Ise Jingu Shrine's Naiku is officially named, "Kotaijingu" (皇大神宮). It worships Amaterasu Omikami 天照坐皇大御神, the ancestor of the Imperial Family and the tutelary kami of the Japanese people. Naiku was founded 2000 years a
is111-20130101-0472.jpg
Crossing Uji Bridge, a little over 100 meters long. 宇治橋
is112-20130101-0474.jpg
A guard watching over the crowd crossing Uji Bridge.
is113-20130101-0475.jpg
Uji Bridge is also rebuilt every 20 years.
is114-20130101-0477.jpg
Uji Bridge goes over Isuzu River. 五十鈴川
is115-20130101-0482.jpg
is116-20130101-0483.jpg
The other end of Uji Bridge also has a torii gate.
is117-20130101-0484.jpg
After crossing Uji Bridge, it is a gravel path to the shrine.
is118-20130101-0490.jpg
is119-20130101-0491.jpg
Barrels of sake as offerings.
is120-20130101-0492.jpg
Place to dispose of old decorations bought from the shrine.
is121-20130101-0495.jpg
Water fountain where you wash your hands and rinse your mouth for purification. 手水舎
is122-20130101-0501.jpg
Before praying at the shrine, you're supposed to purify yourself. Wash your hands and rinse your mouth here. Use the ladle to pour water into your hand, then sip the water from your hand. Don't sip the water directly from the ladle. 手水舎
is123-20130101-0504.jpg
The first torii or Daiichi torii.
is124-20130101-0505.jpg
Another place to purify yourself on the banks of Isuzu River at this place called the Mitarashi. 五十鈴川と御手洗場
is125-20130101-0510.jpg
Dip your hands here in Isuzu River. Auto maker Isuzu was named after this crystal-clear river. 五十鈴川と御手洗場
is126-20130101-0516.jpg
We could easily proceed from Uji Bridge to this Daini (Second) torii. So far so good.
518 files on 3 page(s) 1