Image search results - "bijin"
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The biggest taiko drum festival in the Kanto region is held annually in April. Various taiko drum troupes perform for two full days on various outdoor stages in Narita, including the main stage in front of the Narita-san temple.
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Plum Blossom Queen at Kairakuen StationShe was passing out maps of the garden. It was a nice touch to see two of these kimono beauties greeting us.
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Plum Blossom Queen
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Rear view
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Tekomai geisha costume is partially masculine with trousers instead of skirts. Their right shoulder is "exposed" showing a flower design. They carry a red paper lantern imprinted with their names and use their right hand to drag a wand."Asakusa" is written on her lantern. 手古舞
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Kusatsu Shukuba Festival, Shiga Pref. 大奥夢道中
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Tekomai
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Tekomai geisha
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Kusatsu Shukuba Festival, Shiga Pref.
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Tokushima Awa Odori dancer
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Float pullers at Hirosaki Neputa Matsuri
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1. Fuji Murasaki (Purple Wisteria)Dancer's name is Maiko 舞子
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Prayers to the Kanamara-bune mikoshi かなまら舟神輿Before the portable shrine is taken out to be paraded around town, the god of the shrine must be transferred to it. This is what the head priest is doing.
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Shinjuku Eisa Matsuri, Tokyo
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2. Sumidagawa (Sumida River)
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3. Edo no Nigiwai (Liveliness of Edo)
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Court ladies called myobu. 命婦
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Kusatsu Shukuba Festival, Shiga Pref.
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Plum Blossom Queens in Kairakuen, Mito
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Court lady called myobu. 命婦
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Plum Blossom Queens in Kairakuen, Mito
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Ariwara no Narihira (825-880) comes to east Japan在原業平 東下り
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Tokushima Awa Odori dancer
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Yamato Awa Odori
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Court ladies called uneme. Their kimono have a blue wave design. 釆女釆女
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Tokushima Awa Odori dancer
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"Nanohanaya"
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Unlike normal kimono, she wears the obi sashi in the front instead of the back. This is so that she can show off her beautiful obi which would otherwise be covered by the uchikake outer garment.
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White Heron Dance is one of the highlights of the festival. It is also performed on other occasions in Asakusa. The dance was revived in 1968 in Asakusa to mark the Meiji Period Centennial. It has been performed annually on Nov. 3 ever since. 白鷺の舞
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Setsubun bean throwing at Takahata Fudoson temple, Hino, Tokyo
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Nohime, wife of Oda Nobunaga. 農姫
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Oedo Sukeroku Taiko troupe. They were all girls and super good!大江戸助六太鼓
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Oedo Sukeroku Taiko troupe
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Nene, Toyotomi Hideyoshi's wife
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Okinawan KimonoOkinawa is a chain of subtropical islands in southern Japan between Kyushu and Taiwan. It developed its own language and culture while it was an independent kingdom centuries ago. Okinawan kimono, hairstyles, and dances therefore look quite different from the rest of Japan.

On the left is an Okinawan dancer wearing a kimono with her right arm exposed outside the sleeve. The dance is called "Nuchibana" (flower lei) featuring a string of red and white flowers. The dance expresses the feelings of a young woman in love.

The dancer on the right is wearing an Okinawan kimono called the bingata, perhaps Okinawa's most famous kimono. The design is made by applying dyes through a stencil. It was originally worn by Okinawa's royal family members. It is now the costume of a slow-moving Okinawan dance called "Yotsudake."
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Shrine maiden and Kaminarimon Gate in Asakusa三社大権現祭礼 船渡御
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Finale: "Hana Utage" (Flower Banquet) 花うたげ
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Tomioka Hachiman tekomai geisha
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Tomioka Hachiman tekomai geisha
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Finale: "Hana Utage" (Flower Banquet) 花うたげThis is a maiko.
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Miss Ebisu-bashi Runner-up
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Shinsaibashi Top Lady
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Inner palace women
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Inner palace women
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Genroku Flower-Viewing Dance 元禄花見踊り
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Another Shinsaibashi Top Lady
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Oiran Dochu procession, Tokyo
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Oiran Dochu Procession. This picture was taken next to the Sensoji Temple behind which the parade starts. Before, one oiran courtesan rode in a rickshaw. 花の吉原おいらん道中花の吉原おいらん道中
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Shrine maiden on horseback called Munanori Onna. 騎女
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Oiran Dochu Procession 花の吉原おいらん道中
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Oiran Dochu Procession. This is definitely the highlight of the festival, and my favorite part of the festival. 花の吉原おいらん道中
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Shrine maiden on horseback called Munanori Onna.
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Oiran Dochu Procession. The two little girls are called kamuro.
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Kamogawa Odori Geisha Dance, KyotoA scene from the annual Kamogawa Odori dance held in May in Kyoto. She wears a multi-layer kimono whose colors contrast well with each other. This type of kimono was worn by the nobility.
See more photos of this dance here.
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Oiran Dochu Procession
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Oiran Dochu Procession花の吉原おいらん道中
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Oiran Dochu Procession. Also see the video at YouTube. 花の吉原おいらん道中
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She walks in a very slow and stylized way, her feet taking figure-8 steps. She needs the man's shoulder to steady herself.1 comments
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Oiran Dochu Procession. It's a wig. Also see the video at YouTube.
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Oiran Dochu Procession in front of Kaminarimon Gate, Asakusa.花の吉原おいらん道中
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Oiran Dochu Procession花の吉原おいらん道中
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Oiran Dochu Procession. Her clogs. 花の吉原おいらん道中
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Oiran Dochu Procession. This picture was taken in the 1990s when they had two oiran in the festival. Now they have only one. 花の吉原おいらん道中
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Aoi Festival, KyotoHeld in May, the Aoi (Hollyhock) Festival is one of Kyoto's Big Three festivals. It is a long parade of people dressed in historical costumes from the Heian Period (794-1185) when Kyoto was Japan's capital. Each participant also wears a small branch of hollyhock.
See more photos of this festival here.
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Oiran Dochu Procession花の吉原おいらん道中
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Dance maidens
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Aoi Festival, KyotoThe parade proceeds through a long route in Kyoto, taking a few hours.
See more photos of this festival here.
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Edo Geisha, She was the only one with a smile.
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Edo Geisha江戸芸者
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This was the only one who had a smile. The others were quite serious and solemn.
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Mistress Okichi, the infamous mistress of Townsend Harris, America's first ambassador to Japan when he was in Shimoda. Another mistress was provided to Harris' interpreter.Okichi was the infamous mistress of Townsend Harris, America's first ambassador to Japan. Another mistress was provided to Harris' interpreter.

黒船来航・浦賀奉行
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Awa Odori Dance, Yamato, KanagawaAwa Odori dancers are characterized by their straw hats, a thin kimono called the yukata, and geta clogs. Their heels don't touch the ground, so they dance on their toes. They hop along while shaking their hands above their heads. Since the dance is performed in the summer, often the yukata gets soaked with perspiration.
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Awa Odori Dance, Koenji, TokyoIn late August, Koenji in Tokyo holds one of the largest Awa Odori dances outside Tokushima Prefecture. This woman is a different type of Awa dancer. She wears a head band, a happi coat imprinted with the name of her dance troupe, a pair of white shorts, and a pair of white sock-like shoes called tabi.
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Hanagasa Festival, YamagataDuring early August, northern Japan holds several large-scale summer festivals. One of them is the Hanagasa (Flower Hat) Festival in Yamagata city. Held in the evening, it is a long parade of women dancing while wearing a flowered hat.
See more photos of this festival here.
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Hana-yakko dancer at Chawan Matsuri, Yogo, Shiga
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Fukushima Waraji Matsuri
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Fukushima Waraji Matsuri
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Out of all the geisha that have appeared on postcards, this ever-smiling geisha was unsurpassed in popularity. Her smiling visage appeared in 40 to 50 different poses in photographs and postcards made in Yokohama from the 1890s.
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Her affable and infectious smile made her stand out during a time when most people posing for a photograph did not smile.
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Her name has been a mystery, but I have come across hard evidence that she was a geisha named "Tokimatsu." But I will forever call her the "Laughing Geisha."
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A saucy little Geisha. The pose is good.
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Laughing Geisha with low neck. She's almost semi-nude. It is probably her sexiest pose of all. A great summertime card and one of my favorites. Hand-colored and postmarked Feb. 25, 1908 in Yokohama. The actual card is more yellowed.1 comments
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Laughing Geisha with cowboy hat & cigar. This must be the most humorous pose she created. Those tourists must've gotten a big kick when they saw this card. A geisha from the wild, wild West. Even today, it elicits an affectionate laugh. One of my
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See, hear, nor speak no evil.
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Combing her hair.
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Laughing Geisha with fan. There are two Yokohama postmarks on this card. One in Japanese (over the stamp) and one in English. The actual card is more yellowed and almost brown, but I bleached it with Photoshop.There are two Yokohama postmarks on this card. One in Japanese (over the stamp) and one in English. Japanese postmarks have the date in the Year-month-day format. And English postmarks have it in the Day-month-Western year format. As you may know, Japan bases its years on the Emperor's reign. In the Japanese postmark, you can see "36" for the year. That's not 1936, but Meiji 36 that corresponds to 1903. Besides the Meiji Period (1868-1912), there's the Taisho Period (1912-1926) and the Showa Period (1926-1989). Since the Japanese postmark only indicates the last two digits of the year, it can be a pain to figure out which period the year belongs to. In most cases, we can figure it out with the stamp or type of postcard back.1 comments
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Laughing Geisha on terrace. It looks like she's on the veranda of a restaurant along a river. If she's a Kyoto geisha, it would be the Kamo River. But these cards were made in Yokohama. I wonder if she was from Yokohama.
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Laughing Geisha looking out. The card is postmarked 1903 from Yokohama. The actual card is more yellowed and almost brown, but I bleached it with Photoshop.
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Laughing Geisha with baby. She's nicely posed, and you can even see the baby's face. But the color of her kimono is somewhat drab. A mother (or married woman) does not and need not wear a colorful kimono.
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Laughing Geisha with umbrella. The sender probably wrote about his incredible adventures in Japan. Postmarked 1904 from Yokohama addressed to Hamburg, Germany. The actual card is more yellowed and almost brown, but I bleached it with Photoshop.1 comments
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Laughing Geisha with umbrella. As you may have noticed, the umbrella (and fan) was a commonly used prop in tourist photos. Postmarked 1903 from Yokohama. The actual card is more yellowed and almost brown, but I bleached it with Photoshop.1 comments
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Laughing Geisha in the rain. There's a horse in the background. Maybe she's watching a parade. The ground looks wet.
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Laughing Geisha with Basket. It looks like she's dressed for picking tea leaves. This card, which has an undivided back, dates before 1907. The actual card is more yellowed.
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Another shot of her picking tea leaves.
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Laughing Geisha on Shore. It's kind of strange to see her at the beach but dressed to pick tea leaves. The message on this postcard was written in French, dated 1905.
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Drawing water from a well.
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Pair of Geisha, autographed. One of my most treasured cards. This card was signed (on the chest area) by these two geisha with a fountain pen. Several other geisha also signed the back of the card. (See the next image.)1 comments
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Pair of Geisha, autographed (back). This is the back of the preceding card. It looks like four geisha signed it.
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Geisha and maikoNot a good photo, but their names are written in hiragana on the back. They read "Suimatsu" on the left and "Shigezuru" on the right who is a maiko, not geisha. She has more ornaments in her hair than the geisha. Also notice their blackened teeth. If they are in Kyoto, a geisha is called "geiko." In Tokyo, a maiko (apprentice geisha) is called "hangyoku." This is a postcard-size photo and not a postcard.1 comments
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Maiko in Her RoomA private moment. This maiko is lying down in her kimono reading a comic book after getting tired of playing cards. Her mama-san probably would not be pleased to see her wrinkle the kimono like that. Not sure if this was staged or a candid shot. It's hard for anyone to lie down like that in a kimono.1 comments
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Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments
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Shin-Yoshiwara prostitutes. They are sitting behind the "cage" which fronted the street for all to see (and choose) within the licensed quarters. Shin-Yoshiwara was a famous red-light district of Tokyo. Note that they are not geisha.Geisha were not prostitutes. This photo was taken during 1907-1911. The woman in the far back was the brothel's matron who supervised this live display and everything else. In 1912 when Emperor Meiji died, this live display of women was later replaced by framed photographs of each woman hung near the brothel's entrance. In 1958, prostitution was outlawed in Japan, and Yoshiwara was history.
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Brothel maids or prostitutes. Maids were employed to guide patrons to their rooms and serve sake and food. Or they could be low-class (cheap) prostitutes. Hand-colored, undivided back.
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Geisha Pair Outside Geisha House. These two geisha know how to pose for the camera. It looks like Kyoto. You can tell that they are geisha because of the shorter kimono sleeve, subdued kimono design (mostly black), and their clogs (for rainy weather).
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Patriotic Maiko. Card designed to encourage soldiers on the front line. Notice that her sleeves are so long that you can see her right sleeve touch the ground. That's the kimono of a maiko. This is a modern postcard reproduction.
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Two Patriotic Maiko. To cheer up the soldiers on the front line, pretty and smiling maiko (apprentice geisha) often appeared on postcards for military mail. This card was postmarked Aug. 1940 from Shizuoka city. It was not addressed to a soldier though.Both women are maiko and not full-fledged geisha yet. The sleeves of a maiko's kimono reaches toward the ground as you can see here. (The sleeves of a geisha is shorter.) The kimono design is also more colorful and gaudy. Maiko also wear clogs called pokkuri. They are wedged at the front, so if you are not careful, you can trip forward. Geisha do not wear pokkuri.
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Smiling Maiko Standing. Great smile. This is the same woman in the card where two maiko are holding the Japanese flag.1 comments
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Smiling Maiko Sitting. Real-photo postcard to cheer up soldiers. This card was sent as military mail from Kyoto on New Year's Day 1939. The kanji characters on the fan says "Banzai," the traditional Japanese cheer for victory and happy occasReal-photo postcard to cheer up soldiers. This card was sent as military mail from Kyoto on New Year's Day 1939. The kanji characters on the fan says "Banzai," the traditional Japanese cheer for victory and happy occasions. It also means "long life," something that soldiers would like.1 comments
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Laughing Maiko. Another card to cheer up the men at the front line.
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Maiko hair ornaments. Maiko have more ornaments in their hair than geisha do. The hair ornaments differ depending on the current season. They usually have a flower motif, and if you look closely and see what flower it is, you can tell what season it is.
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The maiko uses her real hair, not a wig. When her hair is down, it reaches her chest.
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Smiling Maiko sitting in gardenNotice her left sleeve reaching the ground. A sign of a maiko's kimono, not a geisha's. Also, the high clogs that she wears are called pokkuri. Maiko wear them, but geisha do not.
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Maiko on Gojobashi Bridge. Postcard-size real photo taken in Kyoto. She has been poorly posed. Her posture is bad, her kimono is ruffled, the sleeves look bad, and her feet are pointing in the wrong direction. Maiko usually know how to pose themselves.Postcard-size real photo taken in Kyoto. She has been poorly posed. Her posture is bad, her kimono is ruffled, the sleeves look bad, and her feet are pointing in the wrong direction. Maiko usually know how to pose themselves for a photograph. But not this one. Perhaps she's an amateur.1 comments
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Maiko with umbrella. The quickest way to tell if she is a geisha or maiko is by looking at her back. The tell-tale sign of a maiko is her long obi sash hanging down behind. Whereas the geisha's sash has a short knot instead.1 comments
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Girl with Umbrella. Hand-colored postcard dating before 1918. The kimono looks like casual wear, and the design pattern was typical during the turn of the 20th century. She's still in her teens it seems. One of the first vintage postcards I bought. Y21 comments
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Girl in Storm. Wires were used inside the kimono to make it look wind-blown like in a rainstorm. Even her clogs are for rain. Early photographers commonly imitated the poses and scenes depicted in ukiyoe woodcut prints and Nihonga paintings.Although the photographer and model were serious in making this picture, it makes you laugh.
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Cheek-to-Cheek. One of my favorite postcards. I wonder if they were sisters. Real-photo postcard with no divided back. The actual card is more yellowed, but I bleached it with Photoshop.
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Mona Lisa Smile. She's cute, ideal for a passport photo. But her hairstyle is more striking than anything. What do you call it? A Westernized Japanese hairstyle?
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After a bath. That's what it looks like. She was another very photogenic woman.
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Smiling for the camera. It's always nice to see a smiling woman on a vintage postard. This is not an ideal smile though. Kind of sheepish and unnatural. Sort of half-hearted and "halfway" like her fan which is only half open.1 comments
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Swimsuit Beauties. These are typical swimsuits worn during the late 19th century. Horizontal stripes were in vogue. They are not posed very well, but there's something charming about them. This postcard is postmarked Aug. 1912. A nice summertime greet
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Swimsuit pin-up. Another picture that makes you laugh. Apparently she felt sexy in that suit and knew how to pose like a pin-up swimsuit model.1 comments
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Nude woman lying down
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Japanese Beauty. I would call this a representative example of a "Nihon Bijin" or Japanese Beauty photograph. She's posed formally, dressed in a kimono, and looking serene and attractive. She might bJe a geisha. Hand-colored, and undivided bI bought it for 1,200 yen.1 comments
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Beauty with fan. The white space around her was for writing the correspondence. You could not write the message on the same side as the address. The back of the postcard was for the address only.So it has an undivided back, which means there is no dividing line between the address side and correspondence side, Postcards with an undivided back were made between 1900 and March 28, 1907. That's how we know the approximate age of this card even though it has no postmark.1 comments
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Woman with pen and scroll. Judging from her hairstyle, this photo was probably taken during the Taisho Period (1912-1926).1 comments
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Poor posture and how not to pose in a kimono.
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Woman on bicycle. That's a thick shawl she's wearing. Must've been winter. It's unusual to see a bicycle used as a studio prop. Riding a bicycle while wearing a kimono must have been difficult. The postmark looks like 1908. Hand-colored.1 comments
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In front of mirror. Hand-colored postcard sent as a Christmas card in 1914.1 comments
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Calligraphy on a folding fan.
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Dancing woman
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Bride leaving her house vis rickshaw.
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Bride arrives at the groom's house.
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Flower in Vase. Nicely composed photograph. With a serene-looking face, she's an ideal postcard model. She also appears in the next postcard.
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Girl at fence. Her posture is crooked, but somehow this photo looks nice. She's not sensationally attractive, but she's photogenic and comes across well. She also appears in the preceding postcard.
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Woman with two flowers. She's holding the flowers in a cross or "X" mark. I wouldn't call that a good way to hold flowers (unless you're a hula dancer).1 comments
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Woman and flower patch. Same woman as in the preceding postcard.
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Girl with Bouquet. Would've been a great shot if she had smiled.
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Woman with flowers. She's wearing two rings on her left hand. She looks like a wife alright. How can you tell? Well, her kimono has a plain design, and the word "married" is written on her face.
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Woman and cherry blossoms. Unfortunately, she's too hunchbacked in this picture.1 comments
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Teruha with chrysanthemum. The flower she's holding matches her kimono design that shows the same flower. Her name was Teruha and she appeared in many postcards. She was born in 1896 in Osaka and worked as a geisha in Shimbashi, Tokyo. Click to read mTeruha with chrysanthemum. The flower she's holding matches her kimono design that shows the same flower. Her name was Teruha and she appeared in many postcards. She was born in 1896 in Osaka and worked as a geisha in Shimbashi, Tokyo before becoming a Buddhist priest in Kyoto. Read more about her interesting life by James A. Gatlin at geikogallery.com.2 comments
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Teruha sitting.Her name was Teruha and she appeared in many postcards. She's probably still in her teens in this photo. She was born in 1896 in Osaka and worked as a geisha in Shimbashi, Tokyo before becoming a Buddhist priest in Kyoto. Read more about her interesting life by James A. Gatlin at geikogallery.com.1 comments
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Rear and side views. Nice side and back shot of a kimono woman. Can't see any wedding ring, but she looks married.1 comments
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Tres Flores. Intriguing pose. It looks like a modern postcard, but it's postmarked 1907!1 comments
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Typical woman and flower. Give a woman a flower and ask her to pose with it, and this is how she typically would hold it.
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Flower arrangement. She's about to put the flower into the vase made of bamboo. On her lap, there's a pair of scissors used for flower arrangement. Her purple kimono has a design showing wisteria flowers. The season must have been spring.The card was printed in color so it's not that old.1 comments
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Hagoita Honey poses in Asakusa
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Hagoita Honey
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Hagoita Honey
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Hagoita Honey
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She was definitely the focal point of the procession before they started using a celebrity to play the daimyo. They past Yumoto Station in the background in the Hakone Daimyo Gyoretsu Procession.
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Taiko drummer at Hachioji Matsuri. She was very good.
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Tekomai at Hachioji Matsuri, Tokyo.
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Hyozu Matsuri Festival 兵主祭
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The 50th Koenji Awa Odori Dance during Aug. 26-27, 2006.
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Koenji Awa Odori
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Ise Jingu shrine maidens look the same as any other shrine maidens. They are likely college students hired just for New Year's to sell goods.
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Oiran
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Spreading her wings. She did almost the same thing as the first oiran, except for the latter part of the show.
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Oiran
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The person in black is the kurogo attendant.
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She posed for me too.
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Kamuro attendants and oiran courtesan at the Ichiyo Sakura Matsuri Oiran Dochu Procession in Asakusa, Tokyo.
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Back of oiran.
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Oiran stopped and posed for me. How nice of her...
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Kagurazaka Awa Odori Dance 神楽坂阿波踊り
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Kagurazaka Awa Odori Dance 神楽坂阿波踊り
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Kagurazaka Awa Odori Dance
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Kitamachi Awa Odori, Tokyo
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Kitamachi Awa Odori, Nerima-ku, Tokyo
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Kichijoji Autumn Festival
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This lady always poses for me. Koenji Awa Odori 2009.
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Koenji Awa Odori 2009
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Hatanaka-kikko-ren, Kita-Urawa Awa Odori in Saitama. 畑中亀甲連
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Kokubunji-ren from Kokubunji. 国分寺連(国分寺)
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Nakamurabashi Awa Odori dancer
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Nakamurabashi Awa Odori
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Nakamurabashi Awa Odori in Sept.
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Okame-ren, Nakamurabashi Awa Odori
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Aoniyoshi Parade at Heijo-kyo, Nara
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These pictures were taken in early May so the flower motif might change in later seasons.
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Tempyo Procession, Nara Heijo-kyo
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Shrine maidens selling fuku-sasa branches at Nishinomiya Shrine's Toka Ebisu.
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The event attracts a lot of photographers who like to photograph women in kimono. Many of the women are also willing to pose if you ask them.
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The woman might even bring a prop like a red umbrella. Nagahama, Shiga.
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Most of them come with friends or with their mother. Nagahama, Shiga.
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Path to Daitsuji Temple was full of kimono ladies for the Nagahama Kimono Garden Party in Shiga.
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It's almost like Coming-of-Age Day in mid-January when 20-year-olds wear kimono to the official ceremony. But these women can be older than 20. I believe most of them are from Shiga, but a good number are also from nearby prefectures like Gifu, Aichi, and Kyoto. A few were foreigners, probably local English teachers. Nagahama, Shiga.
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This woman was nice because she had a traditional Japanese hairstyle (Shimada style) with her real hair which is rare. There are hairdressers in Japan who are trying to learn, preserve, and promote traditional Japanese hairstyles. It's quite complicated to create and you need really long hair. Nagahama, Shiga.
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Nagahama Kimono Garden Party in mid-Oct. in Shiga Prefecture.
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Shibuya Kagoshima Ohara Festival
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Shibuya Kagoshima Ohara Festival
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Atsuhime at Shibuya Kagoshima Ohara Festival
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Taiko drummer at Ome Taisai, Tokyo
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They showed beautiful kimono by models dressed to reflect the past.
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The kimono had flowery designs, but not sure if they were orchids.
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They also gave a geisha-like dance performance.
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Otsuka Awa Odori
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Toshima Kuyakusho-ren (Ward Office), Otsuka Awa Odori 豊島区役所連
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Rice-planting festival dancer, Yasu, Shiga Pref.
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Rice-planting festival dancer, Yasu, Shiga Pref.
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北海道美人
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Girls in Hokkaido look healthy, thanks to Hokkaido's clean environment, wide-open spaces, and good food.
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Shimada Mage Matsuri in Shimada, Shizuoka. Her real hair in Shimada-ryu style.
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Shimada Mage Matsuri in Shimada, Shizuoka. Her real hair in Shimada-ryu style.
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Shimada-ryu hairstyle at Shimada Mage Matsuri, Shizuoka.
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Their costume is quite elegant whichever way you look at it. Shirasagi-no-Mai White Heron Dance, Asakusa.
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Sanja means "Three Shrines," dedicated to the two fishermen who found the Kannon buddha statue and the wealthy landlord who converted them to Buddhism. The statue became the object of worship that founded Sensoji Temple.
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Never too busy for a phone call.
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Asakusa Sanja Matsuri
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I like the sales girls wearing happi coats, a symbol of the shitamachi (old merchants' quarters) area of Tokyo.
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More sales girls wearing happi coats during Tokyo Sky Tree pre-opening festivities for Sumida Ward residents on May 20, 2012.
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Nagata Megumi, Biwako Otsu Tourist Ambassador for 2010, was also in the procession. 永田めぐみ
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