Last additions
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The marathon's lead and end police cars.Jan 03, 2019
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Stats for the top runners in the 73rd Lake Biwa Mainichi Marathon in 2018.Jan 03, 2019
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PR for Expo 2025 in candidate city Osaka. (Osaka won the bid to host Expo 2025.)Jan 03, 2019
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PR for National Sports Festival of Japan to be held in Shiga in 2024.Jan 03, 2019
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Another mascot.Jan 03, 2019
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The Biwako Marathon or Lake Biwa Mainichi Marathon is held annually in March in Otsu. It starts (at 12:30 pm) and finishes at Ojiyama Stadium in central Otsu, near Otsu Shiyakusho-mae Station on the Keihan Ishiyama-Sakamoto Line. Known as one of Japan'a major marathons for top male runners, the Lake Biwa Marathin's 42.195 km course goes along the lake shore and Seta River. The terrain is mostly flat. Before the start of the marathon, there are PR booths near the stadium entrance.Jan 03, 2019
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Mainichi Shimbun mascot. Official marathon site: http://www.lakebiwa-marathon.com/Jan 03, 2019
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Miidera Station platform.Jan 03, 2019
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Miidera Station platform.Jan 03, 2019
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Another entrance to Kano Castle. Thanks to my friend Satomi for driving me around Kano.Jan 03, 2019
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Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Castle stone walls.Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Castle stone walls. Near JR Gifu Station's south exit.Jan 03, 2019
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Jan 03, 2019
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About Kano Castle's Honmaru stone foundation built in the early 1600s.Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Castle stone foundation.Jan 03, 2019
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Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Castle has a large grassy area surrounded by stone walls. No buildings. 加納城Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Castle as it looked originally on a map. All the moats were later filled in. 加納城Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Castle as it looked originally in Gifu. 加納城Jan 03, 2019
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About Kano Castle.Jan 03, 2019
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About Kano Castle. As ordered by Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu, it was built soon after the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600. Parts from Gifu Castle were used to build Kano Castle.Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Castle parking lot.Jan 03, 2019
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Marker for a gate at Kano Castle.Jan 03, 2019
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Marker for a gate at Kano Castle.Jan 03, 2019
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Former Kano Town Hall. 旧加納町役場Jan 03, 2019
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Another road marker. "Go left for Kyoto"Jan 03, 2019
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Road directions and map in English in Kano, Gifu.Jan 03, 2019
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Kosatsu bulletin board was at one end of this bridge over a small river.Jan 03, 2019
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About the Kosatsu bulletin board in Kano-juku. It posted local laws and regulations and other official notices from the local ruler. 高札Jan 03, 2019
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Spot where the Kosatsu bulletin board was in Kano-juku. It was originally on a stone foundation. This spot used to have many people passing by as it was near the castle's front gate. 加納宿 高札Jan 03, 2019
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About the Nakasendo road marker at Kano-juku. It was at the intersection of the Nakasendo and Gifu Roads.Jan 03, 2019
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Nakasendo road marker at Kano-juku. "Go left for Nakasendo." Originally built in 1750. 加納宿 中山道道標Jan 03, 2019
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Kano-juku road marker.Jan 03, 2019
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Kano used to have nine festival floats, but all except one was destroyed by World War II bombing of Gifu in 1945. The shrine buildings were also destroyed.Jan 03, 2019
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Monument marking the birthplace of Gifu's Boy Scouts.Jan 03, 2019
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Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Tenmangu Shrine's ema prayer tablet.Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Tenmangu Shrine office.Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Tenmangu Shrine worships Tenjin, aka Sugawara no Michizane, the god of scholarly learning. This is the Honden hall. 本殿 Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Tenmangu Shrine. Jan 03, 2019
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Kano Tenmangu Shrine's Haiden worship hall. 拝殿Jan 03, 2019
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Koma-inu lion dog.Jan 03, 2019
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Wash basin.Jan 03, 2019
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About Kano Tenmangu Shrine. 加納天満宮Jan 03, 2019
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Entrance to Kano Tenmangu Shrine. 加納天満宮Jan 03, 2019
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Way to Kano Tenmangu Shrine. Jan 03, 2019
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About Princess Kazunomiya's poem and monument.Jan 03, 2019
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Marker for Kano-juku's Honjin. 本陣Jan 03, 2019
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Monument for the poem Princess Kazunomiya composed while in Kano-juku. This is her handwriting. Monument was built in 2002.Jan 03, 2019
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Marker for Kano-juku's Honjin where Princess Kazunomiya once stayed on Oct. 26, 1861 on her way from Kyoto to Edo to marry Shogun Tokugawa Iemochi. 本陣Jan 03, 2019
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Marker for Kano-juku's Waki Honjin. 脇本陣Jan 03, 2019
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Marker for Kano-juku's Waki Honjin. 脇本陣Jan 03, 2019
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Nakasendo Road in Kano-juku.Jan 03, 2019
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Nakasendo Road in Kano-juku.Jan 03, 2019
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SignsJan 03, 2019
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Map of Kano-juku in English. Gifu Station is on the upper right, and Kano Castle is on the left.Jan 03, 2019
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Kano-juku was the 53rd station or lodging/post town of the Nakasendo Road. Not much is left except for a few markers indicating the location of the Waki Honjin, Honjin, and other features. Tenmangu Shrine and Kano Castle's stone walls are the major sights. Short walk south of JR Gifu Station.Jan 03, 2019
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Inside JR Hanwa Line train.Jan 02, 2019
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JR Hanwa Line at JR Otori Station. 鳳駅Jan 02, 2019
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JR Otori Station. 鳳駅Jan 02, 2019
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Otori shopping arcade, but the shops were closed on New Year's Day.Jan 02, 2019
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Otori shopping arcade.Jan 02, 2019
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Manhole in Sakai, Osaka.Jan 02, 2019
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Otori Danjiri Matsuri is held in Oct. Similar to the one in Kishiwada.Jan 02, 2019
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Stay away from brick walls if the earth starts to shake.Jan 02, 2019
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Torii for the back exit.Jan 02, 2019
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Tree roots.Jan 02, 2019
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Secondary shrine for Amaterasu Sun Goddess and Sugawara Michizane. 大鳥美波比神社Jan 02, 2019
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The shrine suffered major damage from Typhoon No. 21 last Sept. Trees were damaged.Jan 02, 2019
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Jan 02, 2019
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Otori Taisha shrine suffered major damage from Typhoon No. 21 in Sept.2018. Part of the roof on the main shrine was damaged.Jan 02, 2019
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You can walk around Otori Taisha's main shrine. Otori Taisha's architecture is called Otori-zukuri.Jan 02, 2019
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OmikujiJan 02, 2019
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New Year's arrows.Jan 02, 2019
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Otori Taisha's ema prayer tablet for the white bird.Jan 02, 2019
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This is Otori Taisha's regular-size ema prayer tablet for the Year of the Boar 2019.Jan 02, 2019
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Next to Otori Taisha's Haiden hall was this jumbo ema prayer tablet for the Year of the Boar 2019. A white boar steadily walking up a hill toward its goal symbolized by the rising sun.Jan 02, 2019
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Especially popular was the omikuji.Jan 02, 2019
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Back of the Haiden hall.Jan 02, 2019
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Patient people.Jan 02, 2019
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No wonder it took so long to get to the shrine. The praying area is quite narrow.Jan 02, 2019
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Offertor pit at Haiden worship hall on New Year's Day 2019.Jan 02, 2019
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Otori Taisha shrine's Haiden worship hall on New Year's Day 2019, Sakai, Osaka. 拝殿Jan 02, 2019
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Otori Taisha shrine's Haiden worship hall on New Year's Day 2019, Sakai, Osaka. 拝殿Jan 02, 2019
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Otori Taisha shrine's Haiden worship hall on New Year's Day 2019, Sakai, Osaka. 拝殿Jan 02, 2019
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Jan 02, 2019
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And closer...Jan 02, 2019
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Getting closer the shrine on the left.Jan 02, 2019
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Wash basin, but hardly anyone used it. People didn't want to lose their place in line.Jan 02, 2019
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I've noticed piles of trash at large Osaka shrines.Jan 02, 2019
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This is a statue of Yamato Takeru (日本武尊) at Otori Taisha. He went around Japan and defeated his enemies until he finally met his demise on Mt. Ibuki in Shiga Prefecture where sought to kill an evil god. This god disguised himself as a white boar (another version says it was a serpent) who sprayed a poisonous mist that sickened Yamato Takeru.

He eventually died and when his body was cremated and buried in Kameyama in Mie Prefecture, his spirit rose from the ashes as a great white bird. This bird landed in a few places before finally landing here in Sakai, Osaka, where this Otori Shrine was built. "Otori" means "Big Bird" (not like Sesame Street, but more like a great swan or firebird).
Jan 02, 2019
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If you've never been to this shrine, it's impossible to tell how far or how near you are. The path makes a few turns.Jan 02, 2019
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Standing still too often.Jan 02, 2019
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Barrels of sake offered to the shrine.Jan 02, 2019
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Much of the time we stood still. Didn't move much.Jan 02, 2019
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The path to the shrine is quite narrow. It took a while to get to the shrine as we inched along.Jan 02, 2019
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Suddenly the path to the shrine got crowded and later this line of people stopped movng. The first torii to Otori Taisha.Jan 02, 2019
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About Otori Taisha in English, Korean, and Chinese.Jan 02, 2019
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Entrance to Otori Taisha on New Year's Day 2019.Jan 02, 2019
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Otori Taisha (officially named "Otori Jinja") shrine is dedicated to Yamato Takeru (日本武尊), a very famous, legendary warrior prince. This is the headquarters shrine of all Otori shrines (大鳥神社) in Japan. Short walk from Otori Station (鳳駅) on the JR Hanwa Line that connects to Tennoji on the Osaka Loop Line.Jan 02, 2019
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The shrine is in the small forest named "Chigusa-no-mori." Not very many people were here so I thought it would be quick and easy to see this shrine. But I was wrong.Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha Station on the Nankai Line.Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha Station on the Nankai Line.Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha Station's Shop Nankai shopping arcade.Jan 02, 2019
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Manhole in Sumiyoshi Ward, Osaka.Jan 02, 2019
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The old and now -closed Sumiyoshi Koen Station for the tram.Jan 02, 2019
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Hankai Line tram at Sumiyoshi Torii-mae stop in front of Sumiyoshi Taisha. 阪堺線 住吉鳥居前停留場Jan 02, 2019
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Hankai Line tram at Sumiyoshi Torii-mae stop in front of Sumiyoshi Taisha. 阪堺線 住吉鳥居前停留場Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Park is across the train tracks from Sumiyoshi Taisha. Big park. 住吉公園Jan 02, 2019
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Food stalls on the way out.Jan 02, 2019
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Ama-zake was good too.Jan 02, 2019
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Jan 02, 2019
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Free serving of hot ginger tea. That was good. Clears your nasal passages.Jan 02, 2019
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Grand tree at Sumiyoshi Taisha, Osaka.Jan 02, 2019
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Grand tree at Sumiyoshi Taisha, Osaka.Jan 02, 2019
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Decorative paddles with a cat.Jan 02, 2019
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Cat rice paddles.Jan 02, 2019
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Small cat figurines for sale.Jan 02, 2019
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About Hattatsu worship. 住吉大社 初辰まいりJan 02, 2019
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About Hattatsu worship. 住吉大社 初辰まいりJan 02, 2019
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Larger beckoning cat figurines at Nankun-sha cat shrine at Sumiyoshi Taisha.Jan 02, 2019
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Tiny beckoning cat figurines at Nankun-sha cat shrine at Sumiyoshi Taisha.Jan 02, 2019
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They have tiny, medium, and large cat statues that you can collect.Jan 02, 2019
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Nankun-sha cat shrine altar (楠珺社). It promotes "Hattatsu" worship. At Sumiyoshi Taisha, Osaka. 初辰まいりYou supposed to come here and worship monthly and collect a total of 48 cat figurines over a period of 24 years. Then you'll get the jackpot of family safety and business prosperity. It's based on a play of words with "48" (shijuhachi) that can be pronounced similarly to "shiju-hattatsu (始終発達) which means "constant advancement or development."Jan 02, 2019
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Inside Nankun-sha cat shrine (楠珺社). Jan 02, 2019
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Nankun-sha cat shrine (楠珺社). Jan 02, 2019
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Nankun-sha cat shrine (楠珺社). Jan 02, 2019
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Banners for the Nankun-sha cat shrine (楠珺社). It's behind Hongu No. 1.Jan 02, 2019
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Small shrine for a great tree.Jan 02, 2019
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New Year's souvenir arrows.Jan 02, 2019
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Rear of Wakamiya Hachimangu.Jan 02, 2019
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Wakamiya Hachimangu Shrine, a secondary shrine of Sumiyoshi Taisha. Worships Hachiman (Emperor Ojin), the guardian deity of the samurai. 若宮八幡宮Hachiman (Emperor Ojin) was the son of Empress Jingu.Jan 02, 2019
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Wakamiya Hachimangu Shrine, a secondary shrine of Sumiyoshi Taisha. The torii is unusual with the middle beam not sticking out the sides. 若宮八幡宮Jan 02, 2019
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Regular ema prayer tablet with Sorihashi Bridge. ¥800 絵馬Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha's ema prayer tablet for 2019, Year of the Boar. ¥1000 絵馬Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 4 shrine.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 3 shrine offertory pit.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 3 shrine in front of the altar protected by netting.Jan 02, 2019
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Rear view of Hongu No. 3 shrine.Jan 02, 2019
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Rear view of Hongu No. 3 and No. 4 shrines. Sumiyoshi-zukuri architectureJan 02, 2019
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Side view of Hongu No. 3.Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha Hongu No. 3 and No. 4 shrines. Both are National Treasures. Hongu No. 4 worships Jingu Kogo (Empress Jingu 神功皇后).(第三本宮・第四本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha Hongu No. 3 shrine, National Treasure. Worships Uwatsutsu no Onomikoto (表筒男命). (第三本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 3 shrine. (第三本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 4 shrine and Hongu No. 2 shrine.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine fence.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine. The Sumiyoshi-zukuri architecture has decorative ridgepoles.Jan 02, 2019
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Back of No. 2 Hongu shrine. Striking contrast with the dark brown, front part of the shrine. (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine offertory pit. A happy time for Shinto shrines. (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine offertory pit. (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine with netting to protect the altar from flyimg coins. (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine. (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha Hongu No. 2 shrine, National Treasure. Worships Nakatsutsu no Onomikoto (中筒男命). (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Omikuji paper fortunes on New Year's Day.Jan 02, 2019
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People going to Hongu No. 1 shrine. Security staff direct and watch the crowd.Jan 02, 2019
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People going to Hongu No. 1 shrine (left). In the distance is the back of Hongu No. 2 shrine.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 1 shrine offertory pit.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 1 shrine offertory pit.Jan 02, 2019
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In front of Hongu No. 1 shrine, shielded with plastic so the coins don't hit the altar or people inside.Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha's Hongu No. 1 shrine, a National Treasure. Osaka city. Worships Sokotsutsu no Onomikoto (底筒男命).Jan 02, 2019
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Go left through that gate to exit and to see the "cat shrine."Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha is the headquarters shrine of all Sumiyoshi shrines in Japan, about 600 of them. Most are in central and western Japan.Jan 02, 2019
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Crowd going to Hongu No. 1. You supposed to pray at Hongu No. 1 first, then you can pray at the other Hongu and secondary shrines. Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3 shrines worship a trio of gods called Sumiyoshi Okami (住吉大神). They are gods of the sea, waka poetry, agriculture and industries, traditional archery, and even sumo wrestling.Jan 02, 2019
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Crowd going to Hongu No. 1. Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha's main shrine consists of four shrines named Hongu No. 1, 2, 3, and 4 (本宮). Each Hongu is dedicated to a different deity and all four Hongu shrines are National Treasures. First you see Hongu No. 3 and 4 here. Jan 02, 2019
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Enter the shrine through the torii and gate ahead.Jan 02, 2019
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Enter the shrine through the torii and gate ahead.Jan 02, 2019
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Sorihashi Bridge (反橋) is a symbol of the shrine and one of the larger taikobashi.Jan 02, 2019
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On Sorihashi Bridge (反橋).Jan 02, 2019
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It has graduated steps.Jan 02, 2019
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Going up the shrine's arch bridge called Sorihashi (反橋).Jan 02, 2019
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Going up the shrine's taikobashi arch bridge called Sorihashi (反橋).Jan 02, 2019
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Jan 02, 2019
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Pass through the first torii, then the taikobashi bridge.Jan 02, 2019
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One bottleneck was here, the tram line crossing. The crowd had to stop here whenever a tram passed through. The shrine is straight ahead.Jan 02, 2019
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It looks very crowded at Sumiyoshi Taisha, but it progressed quickly. Kept on walking most of the time.Jan 02, 2019
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Jan 02, 2019
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Going through the Shop Nankai shopping arcade connected to the train station's exit.Jan 02, 2019
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From the train station platform before noon, we could see the crowd heading to the shrine. This crowd became less in the afternoon.Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha is one of Japan's three most popular shrines during New Year's (Jan. 1 to 3) seeing over 2 million worshippers. The main shrines are National Treasures since they are built in the unique Sumiyoshi-zukuri style. Nicknamed "Sumiyossan" by locals, Sumiyoshi Taisha is the headquarters shrine of all Sumiyoshi shrines in Japan, about 600 of them. Most are in central and western Japan. The shrine is a short walk from Sumiyoshi Taisha Station on the Nankai Line and Hankai Line tram station. These photos were taken on New Year's Day, Jan. 1, 2019, Year of the Boar. Jan 02, 2019
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It wasn't exactly what we had planned for lunch, but it was good and healthy. At least we ate in Toyosu.Dec 28, 2018
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On a street corner near Toyosu Station is where 7-11's first store in Japan opened in 1974. It's still operating here in the same building. Toyosu is quite a new, modern town. Lots of construction still going on. It's turning out quite well.Dec 28, 2018
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Inside Cafe Haus near Toyosu Station.Dec 28, 2018
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Near Toyosu Station is a restaurant called Cafe Haus. It's a good restaurant.Dec 28, 2018
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Inside the Yurikamome Line train. Since we couldn't eat sushi at Toyosu Market, we took the train to Toyosu Station two stops away and had a late lunch there instead.Dec 28, 2018
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Across the water from Toyosu is the Tokyo Olympic Village under construction.Dec 28, 2018
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The vegetable market's biggest item is cabbage, then daikon.Dec 28, 2018
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The fruit market's biggest item is mikan (tangerines), then citrus.Dec 28, 2018
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Dec 28, 2018
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Not much action in the fruit and vegetable market since it was in the afternoon.Dec 28, 2018
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At the end of the corridor, there's this big observation deck where you can see the wholesale section of the fruit and vegetable market.Dec 28, 2018
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Hauling green onions.Dec 28, 2018
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Better view of the fruit/vegetable market toward the end of the corridor.Dec 28, 2018
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Corridor wall also had panels explaining the history of the food and vegetable market in Tokyo.Dec 28, 2018
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Not much of a view though.Dec 28, 2018
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Each observation window was color-coded and named after a fruit or vegetable. A nice touch.Dec 28, 2018
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The observation corridor for tourists inside the fruit and vegetable market. Lots of windows, but they don't show much.Dec 28, 2018
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Entrance to the fruit and vegetable market.Dec 28, 2018
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Lastly, this is the fruit and vegetable market, Block 5.Dec 28, 2018
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Many of the shops had congratulatory flowers for their grand opening.Dec 28, 2018
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Map of Uogashi Yokocho Market in Block 6. Lots of little shops.Dec 28, 2018
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Cutlery shop in Uogashi Yokocho Market.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 6's upper floor has a section of shops called Uogashi Yokocho Market. (This section is not indicated on the official map.) These are small shops catering mainly to market workers. They also sell to the public. However, by 2:00 pm most of the stores were closing.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 6 has many windows for tourists, but you can hardly see anything. We can see just a small slit of the market floor. Just a pathway for the people and turret trucks, you don't see the sellers. However, I was later told that there is also a viewing deck on the first floor where there is a better view.Dec 28, 2018
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Also in the corridor, bilingual explanatory panels for identifying fish.Dec 28, 2018
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Anybody could get on the turret truck and pose for photos.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 6's market entry hall had two turret trucks on display.Dec 28, 2018
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After seeing the Block 6 restaurants, we walked along this long corridor and entered the market part of the building.Dec 28, 2018
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Only this coffee shop was not crowded. So we gave up having a sushi lunch at Toyosu Market. There are plans to build larger restaurant facilities in buildings adjacent to the market. However, they won't open until 2023.Dec 28, 2018
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Long lines everywhere for sushi. The restaurants usually sell out by 2 pm, then they close. The huge crowd is either here for the novelty of a new attraction or they may be a strong sign of Toyosu Market's massive popularity.

I'm afraid the Tsukiji Outer Market will soon be marginalized by Toyosu Market. The market is the heart and soul, and it's now in Toyosu. The fishmongers in Toyosu are very gung-ho now and really want the Toyosu brand to exceed the old Tsukiji brand.
Dec 28, 2018
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Block 6's restaurant section is the larger one at Toyosu Market. However, all the restaurants were totally crowded with people by 1:30 pm. Many restaurants that were at Tsukiji moved here or opened a branch here. Wanna wait 1 to 2 hours for sushi?? Nope, but these people don't seem to mind.

If you want sushi and don't want to wait in line, go to the Tsukiji Outer Market instead.
Dec 28, 2018
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Block 6 has this small entrance to the restaurant section.Dec 28, 2018
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Next is Block 6 where the fish is carved up and sold to sushi restaurants and supermarkets. This is the largest building of the three.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 7 has a restaurant section (not indicated on the official map). All crowded.Dec 28, 2018
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Dec 28, 2018
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Hand signals to indicate numbers at auctions.Dec 28, 2018
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Nice bilingual (Japanese and English) explanatory panels in the corridors. At 2 am, they unload the tuna here. At 4 am, buyers examine the tuna and assess the bid price. At 4:30 am, auction starts. At 7 am, the buyers are busy hauling away the tuna.Dec 28, 2018
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View of the tuna floor in Block 7. The floor was painted green for better contrast with the tuna's red flesh to assess the quality. We visited around 2 pm, so nobody was here. You have to come here by 6 am or 7 am to see some action.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 7's tourist corridor with glass windows to see the tuna floor.Dec 28, 2018
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Another crowd-pleasing tuna display in Block 7. Life-size model of the biggest tuna ever sold at Tsukiji fish market in April 1986. 2.88 meters long, 496 kg. Didn't say how much it sold for.Dec 28, 2018
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Information desk in Block 7's exhibition room. Lots of questions from foreigners to staff who couldn't really speak English.Dec 28, 2018
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Toyosu Market's official mascot: Itchi-no.Dec 28, 2018
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Tuna display in the small exhibition room in Block 7.Dec 28, 2018
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Exhibition room in Block 7.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 7 has this small exhibition room with photos of the old Tsukiji fish market and other things.Dec 28, 2018
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The official website provides this very basic map of Toyosu Market. There are three blocks/buildings all connected to each other and to Shijo-mae Station via pedestrian overpasses.The red lines on this map show the pedestrian overpass to each block. All three buildings have a long tourist corridor with picture windows to see inside the market.

When the market is open (closed on Sun.), tourists can tour the three Toyosu Market buildings from 5 am to 5 pm. However, there's not much market action after late morning.

Besides the markets, there are sushi restaurants. The problem with this map is that it doesn't show where the restaurants are. They are in Blocks 6 and 7. Very crowded though.

Block 7 is where the tuna auctions are held, but the public won't be able to see the auction area until next Jan. But if you come here by 6 am or so, you should be able to see some tuna being hauled away on the floor. This block also has some restaurants.

Block 6 is the largest building of the three. This is where the sold tuna is carved up. This building also has a large sushi restaurant area that is not indicated on this map. The upper floor also has little shops (Uogashi Yokocho Market) for people who work at the market. They sell knives, tea, etc., and also sell to the public, but the shops close by 2 pm or so.

Block 5 is the fruit and vegetable market. Least crowded. No restaurants inside.
Dec 28, 2018
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Directional signs for tourists are in Japanese, English, Chinese, and Korean.Dec 28, 2018
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This is Block 7 where the tuna auctions are held. Let's enter here first. Notice the pedestrian overpass going into the building.Dec 28, 2018
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Toyosu Market is proving to be massively popular among the curious and sushi lovers. Toyosu Market is near Shijo-mae Station (seen on the left here) on the Yurikamome Line that runs between Shimbashi and Toyosu Stations.Dec 28, 2018
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Shijo-mae Station is connected directly to convenient pedestrian overpasses leading to the three Toyosu Market buildings/blocks. (That's Block 6 in the distance.)Dec 28, 2018
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Airline with a plane donning an Oriental White Stork motif.Dec 25, 2018
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Oriental White Stork manhole in Toyooka, Hyogo Prefecture.Dec 25, 2018
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Oriental White Stork manhole in Toyooka, Hyogo Prefecture.Dec 25, 2018
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Confection shaped like stork eggs.Dec 25, 2018
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Gift shops in this building next to the parking lot.Dec 25, 2018
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Park's website: http://www.stork.u-hyogo.ac.jp/en/Dec 25, 2018
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Large biotope used as a stork sanctuary and research facility.Dec 25, 2018
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About the biotope.Dec 25, 2018
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Nesting platform.Dec 25, 2018
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Dec 25, 2018
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