Last additions
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Hankai Line tram at Sumiyoshi Torii-mae stop in front of Sumiyoshi Taisha. 阪堺線 住吉鳥居前停留場Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Park is across the train tracks from Sumiyoshi Taisha. Big park. 住吉公園Jan 02, 2019
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Food stalls on the way out.Jan 02, 2019
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Ama-zake was good too.Jan 02, 2019
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Jan 02, 2019
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Free serving of hot ginger tea. That was good. Clears your nasal passages.Jan 02, 2019
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Grand tree at Sumiyoshi Taisha, Osaka.Jan 02, 2019
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Grand tree at Sumiyoshi Taisha, Osaka.Jan 02, 2019
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Decorative paddles with a cat.Jan 02, 2019
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Cat rice paddles.Jan 02, 2019
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Small cat figurines for sale.Jan 02, 2019
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About Hattatsu worship. 住吉大社 初辰まいりJan 02, 2019
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About Hattatsu worship. 住吉大社 初辰まいりJan 02, 2019
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Larger beckoning cat figurines at Nankun-sha cat shrine at Sumiyoshi Taisha.Jan 02, 2019
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Tiny beckoning cat figurines at Nankun-sha cat shrine at Sumiyoshi Taisha.Jan 02, 2019
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They have tiny, medium, and large cat statues that you can collect.Jan 02, 2019
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Nankun-sha cat shrine altar (楠珺社). It promotes "Hattatsu" worship. At Sumiyoshi Taisha, Osaka. 初辰まいりYou supposed to come here and worship monthly and collect a total of 48 cat figurines over a period of 24 years. Then you'll get the jackpot of family safety and business prosperity. It's based on a play of words with "48" (shijuhachi) that can be pronounced similarly to "shiju-hattatsu (始終発達) which means "constant advancement or development."Jan 02, 2019
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Inside Nankun-sha cat shrine (楠珺社). Jan 02, 2019
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Nankun-sha cat shrine (楠珺社). Jan 02, 2019
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Nankun-sha cat shrine (楠珺社). Jan 02, 2019
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Banners for the Nankun-sha cat shrine (楠珺社). It's behind Hongu No. 1.Jan 02, 2019
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Small shrine for a great tree.Jan 02, 2019
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New Year's souvenir arrows.Jan 02, 2019
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Rear of Wakamiya Hachimangu.Jan 02, 2019
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Wakamiya Hachimangu Shrine, a secondary shrine of Sumiyoshi Taisha. Worships Hachiman (Emperor Ojin), the guardian deity of the samurai. 若宮八幡宮Hachiman (Emperor Ojin) was the son of Empress Jingu.Jan 02, 2019
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Wakamiya Hachimangu Shrine, a secondary shrine of Sumiyoshi Taisha. The torii is unusual with the middle beam not sticking out the sides. 若宮八幡宮Jan 02, 2019
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Regular ema prayer tablet with Sorihashi Bridge. ¥800 絵馬Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha's ema prayer tablet for 2019, Year of the Boar. ¥1000 絵馬Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 4 shrine.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 3 shrine offertory pit.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 3 shrine in front of the altar protected by netting.Jan 02, 2019
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Rear view of Hongu No. 3 shrine.Jan 02, 2019
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Rear view of Hongu No. 3 and No. 4 shrines. Sumiyoshi-zukuri architectureJan 02, 2019
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Side view of Hongu No. 3.Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha Hongu No. 3 and No. 4 shrines. Both are National Treasures. Hongu No. 4 worships Jingu Kogo (Empress Jingu 神功皇后).(第三本宮・第四本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha Hongu No. 3 shrine, National Treasure. Worships Uwatsutsu no Onomikoto (表筒男命). (第三本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 3 shrine. (第三本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 4 shrine and Hongu No. 2 shrine.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine fence.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine. The Sumiyoshi-zukuri architecture has decorative ridgepoles.Jan 02, 2019
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Back of No. 2 Hongu shrine. Striking contrast with the dark brown, front part of the shrine. (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine offertory pit. A happy time for Shinto shrines. (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine offertory pit. (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine with netting to protect the altar from flyimg coins. (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 2 shrine. (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha Hongu No. 2 shrine, National Treasure. Worships Nakatsutsu no Onomikoto (中筒男命). (第二本宮)Jan 02, 2019
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Omikuji paper fortunes on New Year's Day.Jan 02, 2019
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People going to Hongu No. 1 shrine. Security staff direct and watch the crowd.Jan 02, 2019
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People going to Hongu No. 1 shrine (left). In the distance is the back of Hongu No. 2 shrine.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 1 shrine offertory pit.Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 1 shrine offertory pit.Jan 02, 2019
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In front of Hongu No. 1 shrine, shielded with plastic so the coins don't hit the altar or people inside.Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha's Hongu No. 1 shrine, a National Treasure. Osaka city. Worships Sokotsutsu no Onomikoto (底筒男命).Jan 02, 2019
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Go left through that gate to exit and to see the "cat shrine."Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha is the headquarters shrine of all Sumiyoshi shrines in Japan, about 600 of them. Most are in central and western Japan.Jan 02, 2019
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Crowd going to Hongu No. 1. You supposed to pray at Hongu No. 1 first, then you can pray at the other Hongu and secondary shrines. Jan 02, 2019
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Hongu No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3 shrines worship a trio of gods called Sumiyoshi Okami (住吉大神). They are gods of the sea, waka poetry, agriculture and industries, traditional archery, and even sumo wrestling.Jan 02, 2019
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Crowd going to Hongu No. 1. Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha's main shrine consists of four shrines named Hongu No. 1, 2, 3, and 4 (本宮). Each Hongu is dedicated to a different deity and all four Hongu shrines are National Treasures. First you see Hongu No. 3 and 4 here. Jan 02, 2019
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Enter the shrine through the torii and gate ahead.Jan 02, 2019
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Enter the shrine through the torii and gate ahead.Jan 02, 2019
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Sorihashi Bridge (反橋) is a symbol of the shrine and one of the larger taikobashi.Jan 02, 2019
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On Sorihashi Bridge (反橋).Jan 02, 2019
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It has graduated steps.Jan 02, 2019
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Going up the shrine's arch bridge called Sorihashi (反橋).Jan 02, 2019
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Going up the shrine's taikobashi arch bridge called Sorihashi (反橋).Jan 02, 2019
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Pass through the first torii, then the taikobashi bridge.Jan 02, 2019
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One bottleneck was here, the tram line crossing. The crowd had to stop here whenever a tram passed through. The shrine is straight ahead.Jan 02, 2019
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It looks very crowded at Sumiyoshi Taisha, but it progressed quickly. Kept on walking most of the time.Jan 02, 2019
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Going through the Shop Nankai shopping arcade connected to the train station's exit.Jan 02, 2019
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From the train station platform before noon, we could see the crowd heading to the shrine. This crowd became less in the afternoon.Jan 02, 2019
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Sumiyoshi Taisha is one of Japan's three most popular shrines during New Year's (Jan. 1 to 3) seeing over 2 million worshippers. The main shrines are National Treasures since they are built in the unique Sumiyoshi-zukuri style. Nicknamed "Sumiyossan" by locals, Sumiyoshi Taisha is the headquarters shrine of all Sumiyoshi shrines in Japan, about 600 of them. Most are in central and western Japan. The shrine is a short walk from Sumiyoshi Taisha Station on the Nankai Line and Hankai Line tram station. These photos were taken on New Year's Day, Jan. 1, 2019, Year of the Boar. Jan 02, 2019
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It wasn't exactly what we had planned for lunch, but it was good and healthy. At least we ate in Toyosu.Dec 28, 2018
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On a street corner near Toyosu Station is where 7-11's first store in Japan opened in 1974. It's still operating here in the same building. Toyosu is quite a new, modern town. Lots of construction still going on. It's turning out quite well.Dec 28, 2018
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Inside Cafe Haus near Toyosu Station.Dec 28, 2018
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Near Toyosu Station is a restaurant called Cafe Haus. It's a good restaurant.Dec 28, 2018
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Inside the Yurikamome Line train. Since we couldn't eat sushi at Toyosu Market, we took the train to Toyosu Station two stops away and had a late lunch there instead.Dec 28, 2018
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Across the water from Toyosu is the Tokyo Olympic Village under construction.Dec 28, 2018
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The vegetable market's biggest item is cabbage, then daikon.Dec 28, 2018
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The fruit market's biggest item is mikan (tangerines), then citrus.Dec 28, 2018
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Not much action in the fruit and vegetable market since it was in the afternoon.Dec 28, 2018
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At the end of the corridor, there's this big observation deck where you can see the wholesale section of the fruit and vegetable market.Dec 28, 2018
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Hauling green onions.Dec 28, 2018
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Better view of the fruit/vegetable market toward the end of the corridor.Dec 28, 2018
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Corridor wall also had panels explaining the history of the food and vegetable market in Tokyo.Dec 28, 2018
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Not much of a view though.Dec 28, 2018
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Each observation window was color-coded and named after a fruit or vegetable. A nice touch.Dec 28, 2018
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The observation corridor for tourists inside the fruit and vegetable market. Lots of windows, but they don't show much.Dec 28, 2018
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Entrance to the fruit and vegetable market.Dec 28, 2018
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Lastly, this is the fruit and vegetable market, Block 5.Dec 28, 2018
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Many of the shops had congratulatory flowers for their grand opening.Dec 28, 2018
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Map of Uogashi Yokocho Market in Block 6. Lots of little shops.Dec 28, 2018
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Cutlery shop in Uogashi Yokocho Market.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 6's upper floor has a section of shops called Uogashi Yokocho Market. (This section is not indicated on the official map.) These are small shops catering mainly to market workers. They also sell to the public. However, by 2:00 pm most of the stores were closing.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 6 has many windows for tourists, but you can hardly see anything. We can see just a small slit of the market floor. Just a pathway for the people and turret trucks, you don't see the sellers. However, I was later told that there is also a viewing deck on the first floor where there is a better view.Dec 28, 2018
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Also in the corridor, bilingual explanatory panels for identifying fish.Dec 28, 2018
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Anybody could get on the turret truck and pose for photos.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 6's market entry hall had two turret trucks on display.Dec 28, 2018
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After seeing the Block 6 restaurants, we walked along this long corridor and entered the market part of the building.Dec 28, 2018
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Only this coffee shop was not crowded. So we gave up having a sushi lunch at Toyosu Market. There are plans to build larger restaurant facilities in buildings adjacent to the market. However, they won't open until 2023.Dec 28, 2018
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Long lines everywhere for sushi. The restaurants usually sell out by 2 pm, then they close. The huge crowd is either here for the novelty of a new attraction or they may be a strong sign of Toyosu Market's massive popularity.

I'm afraid the Tsukiji Outer Market will soon be marginalized by Toyosu Market. The market is the heart and soul, and it's now in Toyosu. The fishmongers in Toyosu are very gung-ho now and really want the Toyosu brand to exceed the old Tsukiji brand.
Dec 28, 2018
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Block 6's restaurant section is the larger one at Toyosu Market. However, all the restaurants were totally crowded with people by 1:30 pm. Many restaurants that were at Tsukiji moved here or opened a branch here. Wanna wait 1 to 2 hours for sushi?? Nope, but these people don't seem to mind.

If you want sushi and don't want to wait in line, go to the Tsukiji Outer Market instead.
Dec 28, 2018
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Block 6 has this small entrance to the restaurant section.Dec 28, 2018
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Next is Block 6 where the fish is carved up and sold to sushi restaurants and supermarkets. This is the largest building of the three.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 7 has a restaurant section (not indicated on the official map). All crowded.Dec 28, 2018
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Hand signals to indicate numbers at auctions.Dec 28, 2018
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Nice bilingual (Japanese and English) explanatory panels in the corridors. At 2 am, they unload the tuna here. At 4 am, buyers examine the tuna and assess the bid price. At 4:30 am, auction starts. At 7 am, the buyers are busy hauling away the tuna.Dec 28, 2018
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View of the tuna floor in Block 7. The floor was painted green for better contrast with the tuna's red flesh to assess the quality. We visited around 2 pm, so nobody was here. You have to come here by 6 am or 7 am to see some action.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 7's tourist corridor with glass windows to see the tuna floor.Dec 28, 2018
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Another crowd-pleasing tuna display in Block 7. Life-size model of the biggest tuna ever sold at Tsukiji fish market in April 1986. 2.88 meters long, 496 kg. Didn't say how much it sold for.Dec 28, 2018
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Information desk in Block 7's exhibition room. Lots of questions from foreigners to staff who couldn't really speak English.Dec 28, 2018
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Toyosu Market's official mascot: Itchi-no.Dec 28, 2018
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Tuna display in the small exhibition room in Block 7.Dec 28, 2018
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Exhibition room in Block 7.Dec 28, 2018
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Block 7 has this small exhibition room with photos of the old Tsukiji fish market and other things.Dec 28, 2018
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The official website provides this very basic map of Toyosu Market. There are three blocks/buildings all connected to each other and to Shijo-mae Station via pedestrian overpasses.The red lines on this map show the pedestrian overpass to each block. All three buildings have a long tourist corridor with picture windows to see inside the market.

When the market is open (closed on Sun.), tourists can tour the three Toyosu Market buildings from 5 am to 5 pm. However, there's not much market action after late morning.

Besides the markets, there are sushi restaurants. The problem with this map is that it doesn't show where the restaurants are. They are in Blocks 6 and 7. Very crowded though.

Block 7 is where the tuna auctions are held, but the public won't be able to see the auction area until next Jan. But if you come here by 6 am or so, you should be able to see some tuna being hauled away on the floor. This block also has some restaurants.

Block 6 is the largest building of the three. This is where the sold tuna is carved up. This building also has a large sushi restaurant area that is not indicated on this map. The upper floor also has little shops (Uogashi Yokocho Market) for people who work at the market. They sell knives, tea, etc., and also sell to the public, but the shops close by 2 pm or so.

Block 5 is the fruit and vegetable market. Least crowded. No restaurants inside.
Dec 28, 2018
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Directional signs for tourists are in Japanese, English, Chinese, and Korean.Dec 28, 2018
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This is Block 7 where the tuna auctions are held. Let's enter here first. Notice the pedestrian overpass going into the building.Dec 28, 2018
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Toyosu Market is proving to be massively popular among the curious and sushi lovers. Toyosu Market is near Shijo-mae Station (seen on the left here) on the Yurikamome Line that runs between Shimbashi and Toyosu Stations.Dec 28, 2018
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Shijo-mae Station is connected directly to convenient pedestrian overpasses leading to the three Toyosu Market buildings/blocks. (That's Block 6 in the distance.)Dec 28, 2018
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Airline with a plane donning an Oriental White Stork motif.Dec 25, 2018
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Oriental White Stork manhole in Toyooka, Hyogo Prefecture.Dec 25, 2018
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Oriental White Stork manhole in Toyooka, Hyogo Prefecture.Dec 25, 2018
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Confection shaped like stork eggs.Dec 25, 2018
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Gift shops in this building next to the parking lot.Dec 25, 2018
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Park's website: http://www.stork.u-hyogo.ac.jp/en/Dec 25, 2018
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Large biotope used as a stork sanctuary and research facility.Dec 25, 2018
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About the biotope.Dec 25, 2018
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Nesting platform.Dec 25, 2018
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Part of the park is a large biotope used as a stork sanctuary and research facility. Only part of it is open to the public.Dec 25, 2018
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Even insects.Dec 25, 2018
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Aquariums with fish.Dec 25, 2018
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Screening room.Dec 25, 2018
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Exhibits.Dec 25, 2018
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The hanafuda card with the "crane" is actually an Oriental white stork. It actually looks like a cross between the two birds...Dec 25, 2018
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Back inside the Oriental White Stork Culture Center. On the left is the European white stork with a red bill, on the right is the Oriental white stork with a black bill. Very similar.Dec 25, 2018
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Oriental white stork nests are large, about 2 meters diameter, made of tree branches and straw.Dec 25, 2018
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Two Oriental white storks on a nesting platform. Each nesting platform has a video camera monitoring it 24/7 especially during the egg-laying and hatching season in spring.The park is likely crowded during this time until the babies leave the nest in June/July.Dec 25, 2018
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Landing on a nesting platform.Dec 25, 2018
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Oriental white stork eating a fish.Dec 25, 2018
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Storks swallow the fish whole.Dec 25, 2018
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Crows also drop by.Dec 25, 2018
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Grey herons also drop by, but they are always fighting each other.Dec 25, 2018
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Feeding time for the storks also attracts unwanted birds like black kites. They swoop in and steal a fish, then don't come back.Dec 25, 2018
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White stork landing in the paddy during feeding time.Dec 25, 2018
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They make a loud clacking noise with their bills.Dec 25, 2018
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I didn't expect to see the storks flying around, so I was thrilled when a few of them flew overhead while I was in the park. They flew in during feeding time.Dec 25, 2018
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From 2005, the park started releasing Oriental white storks into the wild in Toyooka, which was a great celebration. The birds then started to breed and reproduce in the wild.They've been releasing only a few birds (fewer than 5) almost every year.Dec 25, 2018
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As of Oct. 2018, Japan has over 140 Oriental white storks in the wild. They are also successfully breeding in Tokushima, Shimane, and Kyoto Prefectures. It's still an endangered species, with only slightly over 2,000 of them in the Far East.Dec 25, 2018
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In 1985, six wild Oriental white stork chicks from the USSR (Khabarovsk) were acquired to be raised in Toyooka. From 1989, the birds from Russia started to breed successfully in captivity in Toyooka every year.
Dec 25, 2018
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Toyooka was where the last living Oriental white stork in Japan died in 1986. Pesticides in rice paddies (where they feed) and other environmental problems caused their demise.Dec 25, 2018
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Once found all over Japan, the Oriental white stork ("kounotori" in Japanese) became extinct in the wild in Japan in 1971 despite preservation efforts since 1955.Dec 25, 2018
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The Oriental white stork is a big, beautiful bird often mistaken as the Japanese crane. Wingspan is 2 meters.Dec 25, 2018
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The storks are carnivores, feeding on fish, frogs, snakes, rabbits, mice, etc. Dec 25, 2018
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The Oriental white stork has black and white wings and a black bill.Dec 25, 2018
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Around 9:30 am to 10 am, they feed the storks. This is the best time to visit the park. And the best chances of seeing storks flying around.Dec 25, 2018
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They are throwing small dead fish into the paddies. Dec 25, 2018
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About the Oriental white stork open cage.Dec 25, 2018
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So if you go to Hyogo Park of the Oriental White Stork, you can see real Oriental white storks.Dec 25, 2018
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Toyooka Oriental White Stork Culture Center's open cage for Oriental white storks. There are about nine storks in the open cage. Their wings have been clipped to they cannot fly. Dec 25, 2018
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Toyooka Oriental White Stork Culture Center's open cage for Oriental white storks. It includes paddies used for feeding. The cage is "open" because it only hasa fence and no roof.Dec 25, 2018
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Inside the Oriental White Stork Culture Center. Walk through this building to the other side of the building to see the open cage.Dec 25, 2018
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On the left is the Toyooka Kounotori Bunkakan or Oriental White Stork Culture Center.Dec 25, 2018
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On the right is the park's administrative building.Dec 25, 2018
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The building in the middle is the University of Hyogo Graduate School of Regional Resource Management.Dec 25, 2018
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Basic map of Hyogo Park of the Oriental White Stork. Only one building on the left is open to the public.Dec 25, 2018
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Gate to Hyogo Park of the Oriental White Stork. Open: 9:00 am–5:00 pm, closed Mondays (open if a national holiday and closed the next day instead), December 28th–January 4th.Dec 25, 2018
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White stork mail box at Oriental White Stork Park in Toyooka, Hyogo.Dec 25, 2018
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Kounotori can also mean "bird bringing happiness." Sculpture related to the bird of happiness. Makes people happy especially when the stork delivers your baby.Dec 25, 2018
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Rice paddy has a high nesting platform. The nest still intact.Dec 25, 2018
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Spider web.Dec 25, 2018
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Huge rice paddy within Hyogo Park of the Oriental White Stork.Dec 25, 2018
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Hyogo Park of the Oriental White Stork has a few buildings amid large rice paddies and mountains.Dec 25, 2018
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Dec 25, 2018
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Love Toyooka's bag bus.Dec 25, 2018
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The bus going to Hyogo Park of the Oriental White Stork Park is designed like a bag to promote Toyooka as a bag-producing city.Dec 25, 2018
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From JR Toyooka Station, there are buses that go to Hyogo Park of the Oriental White Stork Park. However, they run only once or twice an hour. Bus schedule under the purple column.Dec 25, 2018
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Oriental white stork decoration at JR Toyooka Station. To see real, living Oriental white storks, you have to visit the Hyogo Park of the Oriental White Stork Park.Dec 25, 2018
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Vending machine with Oriental white stork design motif at JR Toyooka Station.Dec 25, 2018
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Directional sign at JR Toyooka Station.Dec 25, 2018
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When you arrive JR Toyooka Station, you will soon notice that the Oriental white stork ("kounotori" in Japanese) is the symbol of the city. Even the roof looks like a soaring bird. Dec 25, 2018
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Kinosaki Onsen manhole in Toyooka, Hyogo Prefecture.Dec 25, 2018
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Otani River and willow trees.Dec 25, 2018
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Warning sign for drivers for small children. (It means to go slow.)Dec 25, 2018
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Bus stop shelter near Kou-no-Yu in Kinosaki Onsen, Toyooka, Hyogo.Dec 25, 2018
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Kou-no-Yu's outdoor bath in a garden-like setting. 鴻の湯Dec 25, 2018
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Locker and dressing room for men. 鴻の湯Dec 25, 2018
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Entrance to the men's bath and rest area. 鴻の湯Dec 25, 2018
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Entrance lobby of Kou-no-Yu. Shoe lockers on the left, and entrance to the women's bath on the right. 鴻の湯Dec 25, 2018
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About Kou-no-Yu. 鴻の湯Dec 25, 2018
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Kou-no-Yu is open 7:00 am–11:00 pm, closed on Tue. Oriental white stork statues next to Kou-no-Yu.Dec 25, 2018
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The seventh public bath I saw. I entered this one called Kou-no-Yu named after the Oriental white stork. Kinosaki Onsen's oldest hot spring where an Oriental white stork was bathing in the hot spring to heal wounds. That's how the onsen started.Dec 25, 2018
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Otagaki Shiro is also famous for building Kurobe Dam completed in 1963 in Toyama Prefecture to supply electric power to the Kansai Region. He also proposed building Japan's first nuclear power plant at Mihama, Fukui Prefecture completed in 1970.太田垣士郎翁資料館Dec 25, 2018
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At the bottom station of the ropeway is a small museum dedicated to Otagaki Shiro (1894–1964) who proposed the Kinosaki Onsen Ropeway that opened in May 1963. He was a native of Kinosaki and the first president of Kansai Electric Power Company.太田垣士郎翁資料館Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple and the ropeway station.Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's bell dates back to the early Edo Period.Dec 25, 2018
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Kinosaki Art Museum near Onsenji. Mostly Buddhist art. Small admission charged. Open 9 am–4:30 pm, closed second and fourth Thu. of the month when the ropeway is not operating. 城崎美術館Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Tahoto pagoda.Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Tahoto pagoda.Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Tahoto pagoda dates back to 1768. It houses a Buddha statue. 金剛界大日如来Dec 25, 2018
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First floor of Onsenji Temple's Tahoto pagoda.Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Tahoto pagoda. 多宝塔Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Tahoto pagodaDec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Tahoto pagoda. 多宝塔 Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Tahoto pagoda at the top of the stairs.Dec 25, 2018
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About Onsenji Temple.Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's prayer tablet with Kannon on it.Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Hondo main hall.Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Hondo main hall.Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Hondo main hall. National Important Cultural Property. Photography is not allowed inside the temple. temple founder and priest Dochi (道智上人) is also the founder of Kinosaki Onsen hot spring. Dec 25, 2018
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They charge a small admission for a guided tour to see the Kannon statue in the Hondo main hall's altar.Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple. Enter the temple here. Onsenji belongs to the Koyasan Shingon Buddhist sect. It worships an 11-face Kannon statue. Founded in 738 by the priest Dochi, Onsenji Temple is regarded as Kinosaki Onsen's guardian. 温泉寺本坊Dec 25, 2018
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"Onsenji" means "Hot Spring Temple." 温泉寺Dec 25, 2018
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Kinosaki Onsen Ropeway's Onsenji Station.Dec 25, 2018
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Kinosaki Onsen Ropeway's Onsenji Station.Dec 25, 2018
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Dec 25, 2018
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Not much to see on the summit except for the lookout deck. So we go back down to Onsenji midway. 山頂駅 (大師山山頂駅)Dec 25, 2018
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Onsenji Temple's Oku-no-In temple reconstructed in 2010. 奥の院Dec 25, 2018
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Ring of wisdom. Throw clay dishes to the target. かわらけ投げDec 25, 2018
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Dec 25, 2018
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Small Jizo statues.Dec 25, 2018
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