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Held in July, Narita Gion Matsuri Festival has ornate floats pulled on the streets of Narita and to Narita-san temple. Pulling a float on the streetMay 02, 2005
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Last groupMay 02, 2005
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Taiko troupe from OkinawaThis group stole the show with a dragon dance, lion dogs, and eisa taiko drummers.May 02, 2005
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Drum troupe from S. KoreaMay 02, 2005
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Main stage at Narita-san temple.On Saturday evening, the festival climaxes with a free show on the main stage. The best taiko troupes from Japan and overseas performed for 2 hours.May 02, 2005
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Main stage at Narita-san temple.May 02, 2005
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The biggest taiko drum festival in the Kanto region is held annually in April. Various taiko drum troupes perform for two full days on various outdoor stages in Narita, including the main stage in front of the Narita-san temple.May 02, 2005
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During the festival, stage performances are held.May 02, 2005
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Usokae stall. The uosokae dolls come in various sizes, look pretty much the same.May 02, 2005
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Usokae stallMay 02, 2005
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Usokae stallMay 02, 2005
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A pair of giant usokae dolls flank the entrance to the main worship hall.May 02, 2005
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The Usokae Festival is held every January at the Kameido Tenmangu (Tenjin) Shrine. "Uso" means bullfinch, and "kae" means to change. The bullfinch is a symbol of good luck, and uso can also mean "lie." People replace their wooden uso dolls believing that the previous year's bad luck was a lie, to be exchanged for good luck in the new year with the new uso doll.May 02, 2005
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Bullfinch exchange. The person puts her old bullfinch on the rack and prays.May 02, 2005
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People then go to the bullfinch stall on the left of the main worship hall.May 02, 2005
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This is an old, hand-tinted postcard of Kameido Tenmangu Shrine from the early 20th century. It mimics the woodblock print.May 01, 2005
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Road to the shrine from Kameido Station. This main road from Kameido Station is closed on weekends. The shrine is accessible from Kameido Station the the JR Sobu Line.May 01, 2005
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Shot in 2003.May 01, 2005
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Azaleas also bloom around the same time as wisteria at Kameido Tenjin Shrine. Both flowers symbolize Golden Week which is a string of holidays in late April and early May, serving as spring vacation for many workers.May 01, 2005
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Old taiko-bashi bridge. This is the first arch bridge you cross. Shot in 1997. The bridges had steps made of wood. Now both bridges are made of concrete with concrete steps. The paint color is also more red.May 01, 2005
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Old taiko-bashi bridge. You can see how crowded the bridge can get.May 01, 2005
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First bridge and azaleasMay 01, 2005
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Wisteria at Kameido Tenjin ShrineMay 01, 2005
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Kameido Tenjin Shrine wisteria and taiko-bashi bridge. Taiko-bashi is an arch bridge.May 01, 2005
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Second taiko-bashi bridge in 2003. Notice how there are much less flowers along the edge of the pond. Also notice that the bridge has been rebuilt. It is now concrete painted fire-engine red.The old bridge was wooden with faded vermillion paint. I don't like this new bridge paint color.May 01, 2005
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Kameido Tenjin Shrine's main worship hall.May 01, 2005
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Second taiko-bashi bridge in 1997. You can see the second arch bridge which is right before the shrine hall. Compare this picture with the next one.May 01, 2005
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Path to the shrine. After you cross the bridge, there's a narrow path to the shrine, decorated by wisteria on both sides. Very crowded, but not unbearable.May 01, 2005
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Another view from the top of the bridge in 1997.May 01, 2005
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Another shot taken in the good old days. Doesn't bloom like this anymore. The next photo shows what it looks like today.May 01, 2005
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Another view from the top of the bridge in 1997. Sadly, it doesn't bloom like this anymore.1 commentsMay 01, 2005
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Another view from the top of the bridge in the good old days. They don't bloom like this anymore...May 01, 2005
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View from top of bridge in 2005. After 1997 or so, the flowers do not bloom as thickly as before. Apparently, it is quite expensive to get it to bloom thick like in 1997.May 01, 2005
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When the wisteria is in bloom, the shrine gets very crowded, especially on weekends. The alley leading to the shrine is also quite narrow.May 01, 2005
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View from top of bridge in 1997. The shrine has two "taiko-bashi" arch bridges. This is the view from the top of the first one soon after you pass under the torii.May 01, 2005
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Hall entrance and signMay 01, 2005
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Geisha catching a taxi homePhoto by Kevin Mihaly.May 01, 2005
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Hand clappingThis is called sanbon-jime, a series of hand clapping to mark the end of a successful meeting.May 01, 2005
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A bow of thanksMay 01, 2005
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Closing wordsThe women standing in the back are the okami-san (proprietress) of high-class Japanese-style restaurants in Kagurazaka where the geisha are hired to perform at private geisha parties.May 01, 2005
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Towel throwingDuring the finale, the geisha started throwing hand towels to the audience.May 01, 2005
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Towel throwingThere were women in the middle the hall also throwing towels to people sitting further back.May 01, 2005
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FinaleEveryone performed in the finale.May 01, 2005
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Praying at BishamonMay 01, 2005
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Praying at BishamonBishamon is a Buddhist temple in Kagurazaka where the geisha go to worship. The song included a reference to this temple.May 01, 2005
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FinaleMay 01, 2005
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FinaleMay 01, 2005
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After the dance, this geisha posed with us for a picture.May 01, 2005
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The Word Called Love (恋と云う字)May 01, 2005
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悋気しゃんすなSolo number performed by Maiko (her name). 舞子May 01, 2005
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引けや引け引け2 commentsMay 01, 2005
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Kagurazaka geisha danceMay 01, 2005
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Kagurazaka geisha danceMay 01, 2005
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Chestnut Rice Cakes (栗餅)The third number was called "Chestnut Mochi." Mochi is rice cake. They pound sticky rice to make it. Performed by two geisha. The one in blue is a male role.May 01, 2005
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Lively Colors of Kagurazaka(神楽坂華の彩)The final number, called Lively Colors of Kagurazaka (Kagurazaka Hana no Irodori) actually consisted of seven dances. This was the first one performed by three geisha. (ひと里)May 01, 2005
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IntermissionThis Ushigome-Tansu Kumin Hall can hold almost 400 people. Both shows were sold out. Tickets are sold about a month in advance. They sold out within 2 weeks. I was sitting in the middle of the hall (non-reserved seating). Tickets cost only 2,000 yen.May 01, 2005
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Closing curtainMay 01, 2005
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Unlike geisha dances in Kyoto which have elaborate backgrounds, the background here is quite plain, making us focus on the geisha which were enough eye candy. The background really didn't matter. The dances were very aesthetic and pleasing to the eyes and ears.May 01, 2005
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Her big round eyes makes her look like a real doll.May 01, 2005
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Rear viewMay 01, 2005
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Music and singing accompanimentAll numbers was accompanied by live music and singing.May 01, 2005
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Eight Views of Tatsumi (巽八景)The second number was about the Tatsumi and Monzen-nakacho (Fukagawa) district in Koto Ward, Tokyo. The dance reflects the chic and bravado of the area (in the old days) which was one of Tokyo's gay quarters with geisha as well.May 01, 2005
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Shimada hairstyleStandard hairstyle for geisha. This a wig.May 01, 2005
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"Hana no Kai" Dance by Kagurazaka geishaThe "Hana no Kai" geisha dance is held annually by geisha in Kagurazaka, one of Tokyo's major geisha districts. "Hana" means livley or gaudy. And "Kai" can mean gathering or party.

They held two shows on the same day. This was the second show starting at 3 pm on April 16, 2005. It lasted till about 4:45 pm.
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"Blue Ocean Waves" (青海波)They performed four numbers. This first one was called "Blue Ocean Waves" performed by five geisha.May 01, 2005
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Notice that the kimono design shows waves.May 01, 2005
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The following photos were taken by photographers from New Brunswick, Canada during a photo trip to Japan in March 2005. Led and guided by pro photographer Mark Hemmings, they were Kevin Halcrow, Jeff and Kim Matheson, and Ashley Hicks.Apr 20, 2005
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Costume gals. Even these girls walked on the fire.

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Back at the Yakuoin temple which belongs to the Shingon Sect of Buddhism. 薬王院Mar 16, 2005
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Priests parade back to temple.Mar 16, 2005
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Yamabushi--mountain ascetic priests. They carried a conch-shell-like instrument.Mar 16, 2005
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End of the walk. Again we dip our feet in salt. We all ended up with muddy feet. There was no place to wash our feet either. Bringing wet tissues is highly recommended if you plan to walk on the fire.Mar 16, 2005
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This is what it looked like by the time we got there. Hardly any fire. It was somewhat wet, and it did not feel hot or warm at all. Pretty disappointing...This is what it looked like by the time we got there. Hardly any fire. It was somewhat wet, and it did not feel hot or warm at all. Pretty disappointing...Mar 16, 2005
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Then we stick our feet in salt.Mar 16, 2005
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First we pass through a gauntlet of chanters.Mar 16, 2005
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Everyone crosses barefoot, so we took off our shoes as we approached the fire crossing.Mar 16, 2005
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End of the line. It reads, "Saikobi."Mar 16, 2005
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After the priests, the general public is invited to stand in line and cross the fire for free.Mar 16, 2005
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Long line: It took us over 30 minutes to reach the fire.Mar 16, 2005
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I always wondered how hot it was to walk on the fire, so this time I decided to walk over the fire just to see how much heat my feet could bear. Also see the video at YouTube.Mar 16, 2005
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After crossing the fire, each person is blessed by the head priest with a tap on the shoulder by a baton.Mar 16, 2005
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Hiwatari fire-crossing festival, Mt. Takao, TokyoMar 16, 2005
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Walking on fireMar 16, 2005
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Before and after walking over the fire, they stick their feet into a pile of salt.Mar 16, 2005
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First the priests walked on the fire.Mar 16, 2005
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Blessing the pathMar 16, 2005
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This priest splashed the boiling contents of this pot over himself.Mar 16, 2005
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Head priestMar 16, 2005
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Raking the fireMar 16, 2005
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Raking the fire. They are making the footpath for fire walkers.Mar 16, 2005
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She was tossing out these paper things to the crowd.Mar 16, 2005
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The pile catches fire very easily due to the kerosene. Even at this distance, it gets very hot. Also see the video at YouTube.Mar 16, 2005
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Dai-hiwatari Festival, Mt. Takao, TokyoMar 16, 2005
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The pile is first ignited from two sides.Mar 16, 2005
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This long torch will be used to ignite the pile.Mar 16, 2005
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He shoots an arrow into the pile from the four corners.Mar 16, 2005
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Divine arrow to ward off any life-threatening devils. The festival is executed by the mountain ascetic priests called yamabushi.
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Various ceremonies, rituals, and chanting takes place during one hour from 1 pm. Divine ax used to cut away earthly desires.Mar 16, 2005
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The name of the festival is "Hiwatari," literally meaning fire crossing. They make a big fire, then allow people to walk over the embers. This is the centerpiece of the festival, a pile of cypress tree branches to be burned.Mar 16, 2005
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This festival is held on the second Sunday every March at the foot of Mt. Takao. It takes less than an hour from Shinjuku via the Keio Line. Train fare is only 370 yen. The pile of tree branches is supported by a wooden framework. A priest pours kerosene.Mar 16, 2005
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The festival site is a short walk from Takao-san-guchi Station. It's held in this large lot cordoned off by a sacred rope. This festival is held as a prayer for traffic safety, household safety, and personal safety. It is held by the Yakuoin Yukiji Te
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Yotsukaido Station is on the JR Sobu Line on the way to Narita Airport. Map: http://www.kanko.chuo.chiba.jp/c_event/5705/Feb 27, 2005
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The End(s)Feb 27, 2005
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I can't see... That's what he said: "Mienai" The kids nearby were screaming with laughter.Feb 27, 2005
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Warm UpFeb 27, 2005
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Mud SlingingFeb 27, 2005
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Mud Fight Round 2Feb 27, 2005
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New Status Symbol at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba.Feb 27, 2005
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Mud Brings Happiness, at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba.Feb 27, 2005
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After warming up at the fire, they run back to the mud.Feb 27, 2005
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Mud on Your Face: Fashionable, at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba.Feb 27, 2005
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Mud for All AgesFeb 27, 2005
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Keep in mind that this is in the middle of winter.Feb 27, 2005
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A Touch of Mud. One custom is to receive a touch of mud on your face.Feb 27, 2005
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They are in the mud for only a few minutes. Then they go back up to the shrine nearby and warm up near a fire. They go back and forth between the shrine and mud paddy about 4 or 5 times.Feb 27, 2005
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Mud Fight. After clashing and crashing to the mud, they throw mud at each other.Feb 27, 2005
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Mud FightFeb 27, 2005
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The festival is also nicknamed "Doronko Matsuri" which means Mud Festival.Feb 27, 2005
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Some babies wear beautiful kimono for the occasion.Feb 27, 2005
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All the baby-carrying men must be careful not to slip and fall in the mud. Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba.Feb 27, 2005
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Sacred Water (and Mud). On the the left, the water feeding the paddy is enclosed by a sacred rope. This makes the water (and mud) sacred.Feb 27, 2005
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Mud Spotting, Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba. The men hold babies and use mud to paint a mud spot on the baby's face. It is to wish for happiness for the baby.Feb 27, 2005
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Babies to Mud at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba. The men carry babies to the mud paddy and use a straw strand to paint a dot on the baby. Sometimes they use a finger to do it.Feb 27, 2005
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A Man and a Baby at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba.Feb 27, 2005
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Men Take Strands of StrawFeb 27, 2005
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Mimusubi Shrine, Yotsukaido, Chiba. The small shrine that conducts the festival. (皇産霊神社)Feb 27, 2005
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Baby Blessings at Warabi Hadaka Matsuri in Yotsukaido, Chiba. Infants are blessed in front of the shrine.Feb 27, 2005
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Mud Paddy. Main site of the Warabi Hadaka Matsuri held every Feb. 25.Feb 27, 2005
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No wind. This flight lasted only about 30 sec. We ran about 50 meters, then the kite fell back to Earth. Also see the video at YouTube.Jul 14, 2004
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Higher and higher...It went up to about ?? meters.Jul 14, 2004
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Festival posterJul 14, 2004
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Yokaichi Odako giant kite Air borneJul 14, 2004
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And lift off...Jul 14, 2004
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Yokaichi giant kite coming up.Jul 14, 2004
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OK, RUN NOW!! This is the most exciting part when we start running with the rope. It was like a stampede, and I let go after a few seconds to avoid getting runned over by the mob behind me.Jul 14, 2004
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100 kite pullersJul 14, 2004
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Giant Kite sake. The food and souvenir booths sold a variety of merchandise including this locally-brewed sake, complete with a label showing this year's kite design.Jul 14, 2004
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Kite pullers wanted. This booth, next to the giant kite, is where you can apply to pull the kite. Anybody can apply to pull the giant kite. I applied and got a little kite pin and a pair of gloves.Jul 14, 2004
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Kite train or "rendako." These kites are pretty to watch. 連凧Jul 14, 2004
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Ready for another flightJul 14, 2004
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Mini kite flying contestJul 14, 2004
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Sagamihara kite in flight. Due to a lack of wind, this flight didn't last long.Jul 14, 2004
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Sagamihara kite team invited. Sagamihara city in Kanagawa Prefecture also has a giant kite festival, and they were invited to fly a smaller version of their kite at Yokaichi. (Yokaichi was also invited to Sagamihara's kite festival in April.)Jul 14, 2004
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Mini kite flying contest. The flying portion of the kite contest is held.Jul 14, 2004
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Banzai from Sagamihara. After the kite's flight, the Sagamihara team give a few banzais to themselves and to Yokaichi.Jul 14, 2004
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Yokaichi Giant Kite Preservation Society. This is the group responsible for producing, maintaining, and flying the giant kite. 大凧保存会Jul 14, 2004
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Snapped part being repaired.Jul 14, 2004
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Take off. On cue, the people pulling the kite start running and the kite starts to lift off. Also see the video at YouTube.Jul 14, 2004
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Raising the kite. Long bamboo poles are used to prop the huge kite upward to meet the wind.Jul 14, 2004
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