Tokyo 2020 “1 Year to Go!”

Nihonbashi Bridge in Aug. 2019.

Tokyo has been holding some “1 Year to Go!” events. If you visit Tokyo this summer 2019, here are some neat events/things you can see for a limited time.

Olympic Rings at Nihonbashi Bridge

Olympic rings at Nihonbashi Bridge (the lower road, not the unsightly overpass), Point Zero for Japan’s major roads.

Olympics rings were installed on Nihonbashi Bridge this Aug. Instant hit among passersby taking selfies in front of it. The on-site staff couldn’t tell me how long these rings will be here. They are also lit up in the evening.

Nihonbashi Bridge Olympic rings.
Nihonbashi Bridge and Tokyo 2020 lamp post.

Nihombashi City Dressing for TOKYO 2020

COREDO Muromachi Terrace shopping complex in Nihonbashi. COREDO室町テラス

To mark “1 Year to Go!”, the Nihonbashi business district has a few major buildings adorned with Olympics/Paralympics decorations called “Nihombashi City Dressing for TOKYO 2020” from July 23 to Aug. 25, 2019. 日本橋シティドレッシング for TOKYO 2020

Pictures of Japanese athletes on the Coredo Muromachi Terrace shopping complex in Nihonbashi. COREDO室町テラス
Giant Tokyo 2020 noren curtains at Mitsui Tower, Nihonbashi. 日本橋三井タワー
Mitsui Honkan building. 三井本館
Nihonbashi street posts also marked with “Tokyo 2020.”

Nihonbashi is near Mitsukoshi-mae Station, Nihonbashi Station, and also walkable from Tokyo Station and Kanda Station.
Map: https://goo.gl/maps/zd2w1A7vhgFKFSbj6
Official site in Japanese: https://www.mitsuifudosan.co.jp/bethechange/city_dressing/feel2020/

Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Torches

Tokyo 2020 Olympic torch. The Olympic torch is gold, and the Paralympic torch is pinkish.

Tokyo 2020 Olympic/Paralympic torches now on display at Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building No. 1 on the 2nd floor until Aug. 25, 2019, 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. You can hold it and take photos with it. Made of aluminum and very lightweight. The Olympic torch is gold, and the Paralympic torch is pinkish. The building is a short walk from Shinjuku Station’s West Exit (Nishi-guchi). 東京2020聖火リレートーチの展示

Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building No. 1 is the main building with gothic-style twin towers. Both towers have an observation deck for fine views. From the observation deck, you can see the Olympic Stadium.
On the 2nd floor, sign pointing to the entrance of the display space for the Olympic torches.
Sign pointing to the entrance of the display space for the Olympic torches.
Display space for the Olympic torches and flags. 東京都庁第一本庁舎2階北側
After standing in line, you can hold the Olympic or Paralympic torch in front of this signboard and pose for pictures. The staff can take the picture for you.
Tokyo 2020 Olympic torch has a cherry blossom design from the top. Torch runners (about 10,000 of them) have the option to buy their torch in 2020.
After holding the torch, you can sit on this bench and pose with the mascot plush toys Miraito and Someity.
Olympic and Paralympic flags used in the handover ceremonies also displayed. The torches are at the left corner of the room. オリンピック・パラリンピックフラッグ展示コーナー

Super Unusual 2020 Exhibition

Miraitowa and Someity at “Super Unusual 2020 Exhibition” (Futsujanai 2020 Exhibition) at Coredo Muromachi Terrace in Nihonbashi.
PR poster for the exhibition. The poster artist is not credited, but it sure looks like the work of Tadanori Yokoo.

Also in Nihonbashi was this special interactive exhibition called “Super Unusual 2020 Exhibition” (Futsujanai 2020 Exhibition). It had Olympic sports-related interactive activities that anyone could try for fun. This exhibition in Nihonbashi ended on Aug. 4, 2019, but it is being held at Tokyo Midtown Hibiya during Aug. 8 to 25, 2019. Near Ginza and Hibiya Stations (subway) and the Imperial Palace. On weekends, maybe you can see official mascots Miraitowa and Someity. 超ふつうじゃない2020展
Official site: https://www.mitsuifudosan.co.jp/bethechange/other_changes/cho_futsujanai2020/
Map: https://goo.gl/maps/jRWKYgCi1wSnUYzh7

Main entrance to Super Unusual 2020 Exhibition” (Futsujanai 2020 Exhibition). Free admission.
Giant swimmer was an inflatable sculpture.
Fencing activity. The fencer on the left is a mannequin.
About the fencing photo op.
Climbing activity. See if you reach the mailbox’s slot.
They put on this measuring device on your wrist to measure the force of your karate punch. (See how many candles your punch can blow out.) カラテ・キャンドル
Pose like a weightlifter.

Tokyo 2020 Official Countdown Clock at Tokyo Station

The front side shows the days, hours, min., and sec. to go until the Olympics starts. The clock sculpture supposed to depict the rising sun.

At Tokyo Station, a large Tokyo 2020 Olympics/Paralympics countdown clock was unveiled by the Tokyo Governor and other officials on July 24, 2019 as a “1 Year to Go!” event. It’s a two-sided clock. Omega is the official Olympics timekeeper (since 1932!). (I feel sorry for Seiko.) It’s right outside the Marunouchi side of Tokyo Station (in front of the red brick station building).
https://www.olympic.org/news/official-olympic-timekeeper-omega-and-tokyo-2020-mark-one-year-countdown

The back shows the countdown to the Paralympics.

Olympic venues under construction

The swank building on the left is Ariake Arena for volleyball and on the right is Ariake Gymnastics Centre both under construction. Seen from the Yurikamome Line running between Shimbashi and Toyosu Stations. Photo taken in July 2019.

You can see a few Olympic venues still under construction. From the Yurikamome Line you can see the Ariake Arena and the Ariake Gymnastics Centre under construction. These two venues might require a 15-min. or longer walk from the arrival train station. The so-called “Last Mile” (including the security check) might be a major problem in the summer heat for some venues. The organizer is thinking about how to make it cooler/easier for spectators.

Olympic Stadium under construction as seen from Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building observation deck. Photo taken in July 2018.

The new Olympic Stadium (New National Stadium) is also clearly visible from the surrounding roads and the JR Chuo and Sobu Lines. The closest stations are Kokuritsu-Kyogijo Station (Oedo Line) and JR Sendagaya Station.

Tokyo Aquatics Centre under construction. Very near the Water Polo Centre (Tatsumi Pool). Near Shin-Kiba Station and Tatsumi Station. This photo was taken in spring 2019.
Olympic Village for athletes under construction. Seen from Harumi Passenger Terminal (boat dock). Photo taken in May 2019.

Official Tokyo 2020 Olympics Stores

Shinjuku West Shop (HALC/BIC Camera) near Shinjuku Station in Tokyo.

Official Tokyo 2020 Olympics merchandise is available in official stores in Tokyo and major cities like Sapporo, Sendai, Nagoya, Kyoto, Osaka, Hiroshima, Fukuoka, and Naha. Many of the official shops are inside a BIC Camera store.
There’s also an online shop, but it doesn’t ship outside Japan: https://tokyo2020shop.jp/
List of official shops: https://tokyo2020shop.jp/contents/official_shop

Tokyo 2020 official pins in an official shop.
Tokyo 2020 Olympics yukata.
Tokyo 2020 Paralympics yukata.
Tokyo 2020 mascot Miraitowa and Someity plush toys (large size).

Tokyo city buses with Olympic mascot livery

At Shin-Kiba Station.

Some Tokyo city buses (Toei) have the Olympic mascot livery. They run in central Tokyo such in Nihonbashi, Shinjuku, Kiba, and Koto-ku. Currently, there are 18 Toei city buses in this livery with more to come. A few Odakyu, Keio, and Seibu buses will also sport this design.

Miraitowa on wheels in Nihonbashi.

Google Map of Tokyo 2020 Olympic venues and shops

I made this Google Map of all Tokyo 2020 Olympic venues and most of the official shops (also embedded below): https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1HONOE9ks1Gedrn8hWeN6cvxAWwpD9SJd&usp=sharing

Tokyo Marathon 2014

Tokyo Marathon was held on Feb. 23, 2014. Here’s a collection of the most outstanding and incredulous costumes. I was near Suitengu Station which was about 10 km from the finish line.

Monkey head

Monkey head

This guy was running with his bride with heart-shaped balloons.

This guy was running with his bride with heart-shaped balloons.

20140223-0941

Japan mailbox. Painted on his face is the symbol of the Japan post office: 〒

20140223-0947

Jesus Christ, barefoot!

20140223-0977

Well coordinated.

From another planet.

From another planet.

20140223-0983

Carrying a surfboard while wearing rubber slippers.

20140223-1110

The biggest costume I saw. Couldn’t get a clear shot though.

20140223-1124funa

Very popular mascot named Funasshi, from Funabashi, Chiba.

20140223-1155

Ouch!

20140223-1162

Santa Claus with a big bag of presents.

20140223-1243

Geta clogs matching his monk costume.

20140223-1081

Kabuki

20140223-1058

Cross dressers galore

20140223-1113

Tuba player

20140223-1322

Monja

20140223-1282

Yep, these costumes can get hot.

20140223-1308

Golden frog. The note from his mouth says, “Feed me” (as in money).

20140223-1332

Man named Joseph. He’s got a small camera on his head as well as a smartphone rigged in front of him.

20140223-1345

At the end, a few buses carried runners who had to give up. The buses were quite empty though. The 36,000 runners had 7 hours to complete the marathon. Some 96% finished it.

1 2 3 4