Image search results - "zen"
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Located in Higashi-Omi and established in 1361, Eigenji is a temple of the Zen Rinzai Buddhist Sect (Eigenji School) and well-known for fall colors with 3,000 maple trees. Touristy entrance to Eigenji. Map
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Although not part of the Koto Sanzan Temple Trio (all Tendai Buddhist temples), most visitors also visit Eigenji together with the Koto Sanzan temples. Accessible by bus taking 30-40 min. from Yokaichi Station on the Omi Railway Line or from Hyakusaiji. 4 comments
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The temple is built along the Echi River. Admission 500 yen. For the elderly, these many, but not impossible, steps might be difficult. At least we can soon enjoy the fall colors in Nov.
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Entrance Gate. This is where you pay admission. 総門
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Autumn foilage greets you in Nov.
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San-mon Gate. Built in 1802. 三門
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San-mon Gate
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Eigenji Hondo temple hall. Built in 1765.
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Inside Hondo temple hall, Eigenji
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Inside Hondo temple hall
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Inside Hondo temple hall
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Bell tower and offertory box. In front of the temple hall. 鐘楼
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Bell tower 鐘楼
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Sutra Repository 経堂
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Sutra Repository 経堂
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Eigenji Dam
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Echibashi Bridge over Echi River. Nice views of the river can be had from this bridge.
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Echigawa River empties into Lake Biwa.
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Visit a Koto Sanzan Temple at Hyakusaiji.
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Memorial for the war dead
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Frozen tuna auctions. Buyers signal the auctioneer. Also see my YouTube video here.
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Frozen tuna anyone?
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Headless frozen tuna.
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These frozen fish did not show any signs of melting. Wonder how long it takes for them to defrost.
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Each fish is worth thousands or tens of thousands of US dollars.
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Looks good to me.
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Tying a ribbon on fish.
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Frozen tuna head
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Tuna belly, the fatty part of the fish for toro sashimi.
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Looks yummy.
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After the auctions are over, they haul out the fish using a variety methods.
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Hauling these tuna on this lift looked easy.
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All full and ready to go. Gee, how much is all that tuna worth??
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Smaller trolley for a smaller haul.
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Hand-drawn cart.
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Hand-drawn cart, good for four fish.
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Good exercise in the morning.
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The fish is taken to the fish stalls in the market.
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The frozen tuna is cut up into quarters lengthwise by a band saw.
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The band saw easily cuts through the frozen flesh. Also see my YouTube video here.
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Quite a few more to cut up.
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After the fish is cut, they shave it with an ax.
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Cutting up a fresh fish. They use a long, sharp knife, and not a band saw.
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Tuna knives
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I wonder how long it takes to be able to cut up a giant tuna.
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Where the head was attached.
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The fresh tuna is cut up into smaller blocks.
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This size is easy to sell to mom and pop sushi restaurants.
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Fresh tuna
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Caught in the Pacific Ocean.
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The tuna flesh between the rib-like bones is also choice meat. It is scraped off with a spoon.
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Packaged to sell.
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Path to front gate of Gotokuji Temple known as the Ii Clan's family temple. Over 300 lords (incuding 6 Hikone Castle lords), wives, concubines, and children related to the Ii Clan from Hikone Castle in Shiga Prefecture, are buried here.
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Entrance to temple grounds. Gotokuji is near Odakyu Line's Gotokuji Station in Tokyo. 豪徳寺駅
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Path to front gate of Gotokuji Temple.
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Somon front gate of Gotokuji Temple.
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Somon front gate of Gotokuji Temple in Setagaya, Tokyo. On the left corner is a historic site stone marker for Ii Naosuke's gravesite. 豪徳寺
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Historic site marker for Ii Naosuke's gravesite. Gotokuji Temple is known as the Ii Clan's family temple. Over 300 lords, wives, concubines, and children related to the Ii Clan, from Hikone Castle in Shiga Prefecture, are buried here.
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After going through the Somon front gate, we see the pagoda and the Butsuden Buddha Hall straight ahead.
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Butsuden Buddha Hall straight ahead.
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Incense burner and Butsuden Buddha Hall.
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Butsuden Buddha Hall, Gotokuji temple, Setagaya, Tokyo. This was renovated by Lord Ii Naotaka's wife and oldest daughter. 仏殿
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Roof ridge of Butsuden includes the family crest for the Ii Clan. Gotokuji temple.
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Butsuden Buddha Hall
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Inside Butsuden Buddha Hall 仏殿
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Butsuden Buddha Hall side view.
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Butsuden Buddha Hall and the Hondo main worship hall behind on the right.
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Gotokuji temple's Hondo Main Hall 本堂
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Gotokuji temple's Hondo Main Hall, Setagaya, Tokyo. Ii clan's family temple. 本堂
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Hondo Main Hall
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Inside Hondo Main Hall
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Ii clan crest on rain water barrel under the roof of Gotokuji temple Hondo Hall, Setagaya, Tokyo.
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Hondo Main Hall
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View from Hondo Main Hall
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Bell tower
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Three-story pagoda
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Three-story pagoda, recently built.
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Temple office sells souvenirs such as the maneki neko beckoning cat in various sizes (and prices).
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Temple office sells maneki neko beckoning cat in various sizes (and prices).
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Path to the temple cemetery where the Ii clan is buried.
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Gate to Maneki Neko Beckoning Cat Temple. There are a few theories (or legends) as to how the maneki neko (Beckoning Cat) was created. One theory comes from this temple.
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Maneki Neko Beckoning Cat Temple is a small worship hall dedicated to the beckoning cat. On the left of the temple, notice a little roofed shelf. 猫観音を祀る招猫殿
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Inside Beckoning Cat Temple. The altar's objects of worship are numerous beckoning cat dolls.
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One day, Lord Ii Naotaka was doing falconry and was on his way home when it started to rain. He sought shelter under a tree at the temple. Then he saw a cat raising its paw...He went to the cat and then lightning struck the tree he was standing under. In appreciation, Naotaka gave donations to the temple.
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On the left of the Beckoning Cat Temple is a shelf where you can offer your lucky cat after it has brought you good luck.
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Shelf for beckoning cats, maneki neko at Gotokuji temple in Setagaya, Tokyo.
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Shelf for beckoning cats, maneki neko. Gotokuji temple, Setagaya, Tokyo.1 comments
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Beckoning cats, maneki neko, which did their duty for their owners who now offer them to the temple as a gesture of thanks. Gotokuji temple, Tokyo.
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Gotokuji temple votive tablet. This cat connection with Ii Naotaka gave rise to Hiko-nyan, the official mascot of Hikone, Shiga Prefecture.
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Way to cemetery. Six Hikone Castle lords, including Ii Naosuke, have graves here. Setagaya was the domain of the Ii clan who often worked in the Tokugawa government.
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Straight ahead is the grave of Lord Ii Naotaka, the 2nd lord of Hikone Castle in Shiga Prefecture.
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Turn left and you see this. Ii clan graves on both sides. Lord Ii Naosuke's grave is at the very end on the left.
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Lord Ii Naosuke's grave is at the very end on the left.
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Grave of Lord Ii Naosuke (1815-1860), the lord of Hikone Castle in Shiga Prefecture and Chief Minister of the Tokugawa Shogun's government. Gotokuji temple, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo. 井伊直弼の墓 豪徳寺
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Only Ii Naosuke's grave has a sign explaining about him.
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Grave of Lord Ii Naosuke (1815-1860), the lord of Hikone Castle in Shiga Prefecture and Chief Minister of the Tokugawa Shogun's government. Gotokuji temple, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo. 井伊直弼の墓 豪徳寺
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Gravestone of Ii Naosuke.
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Right side of Lord Ii Naosuke's grave.
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Tree of white camellias grow about Lord Ii Naosuke's grave.
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Grave of Lord Ii Naosuke's wife.
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Grave of Lord Ii Naohide (1755-1789). He served as Tairo Chief Minister in the Tokugawa government. Gotokuji temple, Setagaya, Tokyo 井伊直幸
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Grave of Lord Ii Naotaka's eldest daughter who donated a lot to the temple. 井伊直孝長女
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Grave of Lord Ii Naotaka (1590-1659), 2nd lord of Hikone, Shiga. Gotokuji temple, Setagaya, Tokyo 井伊直孝
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Grave of Lord Ii Naoyoshi (1727-1754), Gotokuji temple, Setagaya, Tokyo 井伊直禔
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Grave of Lord Ii Naotsune (1693-1710), Gotokuji temple, Setagaya, Tokyo 井伊直恒
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Grave of Lord Ii Naonori on right.
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Grave of Lord Ii Naonori (1848-1904), Gotokuji temple, Setagaya, Tokyo 井伊直憲の墓
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Six Jizo
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Higashimon East Gate (closed)
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Ii family crest on East Gate
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The temple is surrounded by a wall with barbed wire.
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On New Year's Eve, Gotokuji temple allows people to ring the temple bell to ring out the old year in a ceremony called Joya-no-kane.
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The line of people got longer and longer as midnight approached.
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Quite a few people braved the cold to ring the temple bell on New Year's Eve on Dec. 31, 2014.
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Temple bell in sight. Had to wait about an hour.
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Gotokuji's temple bell on New Year's Eve.
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Ringing Gotokuji's temple bell on New Year's Eve.
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Each person got to ring the bell only once.
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Gotokuji Station on early New Year's morning.
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Kita-Kamakura Station on the JR Yokosuka Line. The train platform is still too small for the hordes of tourists that arrive.
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Hint of what's to come. Hydrangeas on the way to Meigetsu-in.
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Entrance (left) to Meigetsu-in. Exit is on the right.
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About Meigetsu-in temple. Meigetsu means "bright moon."
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One ticket booth to Meigetsu-in.
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The main drag to Meigetsu-in temple's Hondo hall is lined with ajisai.
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It's an incredible path of hydrangea.
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During the first half of June, the temple sees its most visitors.
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Nicknamed the Hydrangea Temple (Ajisai-dera), Meigetsu-in must have one of Japan's highest concentration of ajisai within its grounds.
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A gate at the end of the main path to the temple hall.
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Meigetsu-in's Hondo hall. The temple belongs to the Rinzai Zen Buddhist sect.
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Inside the Hondo hall.
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Another room in the temple has this famous round opening facing a garden.
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Meigetsu-in's famous round window/door.
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Meigetsu-in garden
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Meigetsu-in's garden is also open to the public in early June when irises are in bloom.
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Karesansui garden
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Soyu-do Founder's Hall
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Inside Soyu-do.
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About Soyu-do.
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Adjacent to the Soyu-do.
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Kame-no-i Well (Jug Well)
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About Kame-no-i Well
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Meigetsu-in Yagura cavern.
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Meigetsu-in Yagura cave.
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Meigetsu-in Yagura cave.
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About Meigetsu-in Yagura cave.
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The temple also has a small bamboo forest.
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Benzaiten
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Grave of Hojo Tokiyori.
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About the Grave of Hojo Tokiyori.
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Tea house where you can buy tea or soft drinks.
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Exit path
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Manpukuji (萬福寺) is a large temple complex and headquarters of a Chinese Zen sect (Obaku-shu). It's one of the Big Three Zen sects in Japan (besides Soto and Rinzai).The founder was Chinese Zen master Yinyuan Longqi (Ingen) from Fujien Province in China who came to Japan via Nagasaki in 1654. Manpukuji (or Mampukuji) is part of the Japan Heritage for Uji tea history. A short walk from Obaku Station on the JR Nara Line and Keihan Uji Line.
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Chinese-style Somon Gate (Important Cultural Property), the first entrance to Manpukuji. It's a quite a large temple complex with numerous buildings. A few of the major buildings are open to the public. 総門(そうもん)
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Koma no Ashikage-en Monument in front of the entrance to Manpukuji temple. This can be roughly translated as "Hoof Print Field Monument." 駒蹄影園跡碑This monument is part of the Japan Heritage designation for Uji tea history.
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About Koma no Ashikage-en Monument. According to legend, local people in Uji pondered over how to sow the seeds to grow tea.It was then Priest Myoe (明恵), from the Kegon-shu Buddhist Sect, came on horseback and trotted on the field saying, "Plant the seeds in my horse's hoof prints." This monument was built by Uji tea growers in 1926 to express their appreciation to Myoe.
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Lotus pond in front of Sanmon Gate. 放生池
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The Sanmon main gate (Important Cultural Property). 三門(さんもん)
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Sanmon main gate. 三門(さんもん)
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At the Sanmon Gate, pay the admission to enter the temple. It's a very interesting temple, but they don't really have English explanations.
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The Sanmon main gate (exit side). 三門(さんもん)
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From Sanmon Gate, path to Tennoden Hall. The path is modeled after dragon scales.
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From Sanmon Gate, path to Tennoden Hall. The path is modeled after dragon scales.
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From Sanmon Gate, path to Tennoden Hall. The path is modeled after dragon scales.
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Before going to Tennoden Hall, we turned left to this small gate leading to Kaizan-do Hall.
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Karahafu roof gable
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Karahafu roof gable
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Very fine roof.
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Manpukuji's Kaizan-do Hall (Important Cultural Property) where sect founder Yinyuan Longqi (Ingen) is worshipped. 開山堂(かいさんどう)
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Chinese-style architecture is obvious with the roof corners curling upward.
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Chinese design on the railing. Temple buildings are in Ming-style. Many buildings are Important Cultural Properties, but no National Treasures. 卍崩しのデザイン
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Altar inside the Kaizan-do Hall.
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Kaizan-do Hall
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The big Sanmon Gate in the background.
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Manpukuji has a lot of covered corridors linking the major buildings.
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寿塔
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石碑
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Manpukuji corridor lanterns.
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Manpukuji temple bell in a corridor.
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Manpukuji temple bell in a corridor.
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Tennoden Hall (Important Cultural Property). 天王殿(てんのうでん)
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Inside the Tennoden Hall is Hotei, one of the Seven Gods of Good Fortune. 天王殿(てんのうでん)、弥勒菩薩(布袋)
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Our Manpukuji priest guide admits his resemblance to Hotei and kindly posed next to it.
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Inside Manpukuji's Tennoden Hall is Hotei, one of the Seven Gods of Good Fortune. 天王殿(てんのうでん)、弥勒菩薩(布袋)
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Our Manpukuji priest guide spoke through our interpreter.
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Statue behind the Hotei statue.
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