Image search results - "summer"
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Entrance to Ikaho Onsen. Ikaho Spa has two Hawaii connections. One is with Hawaiian Minister to Japan Robert W. Irwin who had a summer house in Ikaho.
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On July 16, the night before the Gion Matsuri Yamaboko Junko parade of floats, the Yoiyama display of floats lit up at night attract huge crowds in central Kyoto. You can also enter some of the grand floats.
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Held during Aug. 3-5 at Taga Taisha Shrine, the Mantosai or 10,000-Lantern Festival is a night festival when numerous lanterns are lit within the shrine grounds. The lanterns are for the repose of ancestral spirits.
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Ikaho is also a sister city of Hawaii island. During Aug. 5-7, 2003, Ikaho hosted the 7th King Kalakaua Merrie Monarch Hawaiian Festival featuring hula performances by numerous Japanese hula groups.
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Even before evening comes, a large crowd stop to see the Naginata-boko float at Shijo-Karasuma.
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Taga Taisha Shrine torii near Taga Taisha-mae Station. MAP
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In the evenings, Hawaii's top hula halau (winner of the Merrie Monarch Festival in Hawaii) performed as the festival's main event. Photo: Flags of Hawaii and Ikaho town (merged with Shibukawa in 2006).
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People vying to see Naginata-boko float.
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Road to Taga Taisha Shrine
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Town parking lot with a makeshift stage and main venue of the festival. The "Merrie Monarch" refers to King David Kalakaua who reigned over the Hawaiian Kingdom 1874-1891. He promoted hula in Hawaii as well as Japanese immigration to Hawaii.
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Bridge to the float.
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Homes along the way are decorated.
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Canopy for the spectators fronting the main outdoor stage.
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Maiko alert
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Near the shrine entrance are the usual food stalls.
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Main stage where many Japanese hula troupes performed during the day for three days. Free admission.
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Maiko poses in front of the Naginata-boko float across the street in Kyoto
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Tahitian dances were also performed.
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A real crowd pleaser. Thanks for posing!
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Welcome to Taga
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Hawaiian souvenirs for sale.
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Maiko pose
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Taga Taisha Shrine torii
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Ikaho is famous for the Stone Steps lined with shops. A section of it also served as a second hula stage during the day.
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Side street of food and souvenir stalls
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Mantosai sign under the torii
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Hula on the Stone Steps 石段街
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Yamabushi-yama residence opened up for public display
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Arched bridge leading to shrine gate.
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Hula workshops are also offered during the day at cost. A famous kumu hula teacher from Hawaii teaches the class.
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Yamabushi-yama 山伏山
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Other workshops are held such as ukulele lessons and a lei-making class.
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Yamabushi-yama
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In the evenings, the overall winner of the annual Merrie Monarch Festival in Hawaii performed on stage. In 2003, it was Hula Halau 'O Kamuela from Oahu. They performed both the ancient hula kahiko dances (pictured here) and modern auana dances in Ikah
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Tenjin-yama 天神山
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The Ikaho hula festival is officially sanctioned by The Merrie Monarch Festival, held in spring in Hilo, Hawaii. It is the most important and prestigious hula competition.
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Tenjin-yama
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Kids carrying mikoshi portable shrine. They went to the train station.
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Hula is also performed by men. These photos were taken during the 7th Ikaho Hawaiian Festival (Aug. 5-7, 2003).
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Souvenir hunters. Cheap geta clogs and yukata (made in China) are sold.
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Taga Taisha's lanterns come in five sizes. Each one represents a donation. The donar's name is on the lantern. The biggest lantern requires a donation of 20,000 yen.
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Geta for 600 yen
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Each lantern is lit with a small lightbulb. (No candles)
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They wore a variety of colorful costumes and used various hula instruments such as these frayed bamboo sticks called Pūʻili.
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Maiko in my midst
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Festival schedule, starting at 5:30 pm and ending after 9 pm.
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Modern hula dances such as this one is mainly for tourist entertainment.
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Yoshikawa
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Yoshikawa: A special treat is that private residences in the old kimono merchant district open up their entryways to show folding screens, kimono, and other treasures.
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Approaching the main shrine hall.
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Yoshikawa
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These lanterns above are the smallest ones, requiring a donation of only 1,500 yen. They are the most numerous.
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Matsuzakaya 松坂屋
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Main shrine hall
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After the bamboo sticks, the girls used a gourd drum called ipu.
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These lanterns hanging in the main shrine hall must be the most expensive ones.
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Finally, they use feathered gourd rattles called Ulīʻulī.
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Teens in yukata
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The shrine also recently got its roof rethatched. The roof looked spanking new.
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If you like women in yukata, see the Yoiyama (or Yoiyoiyama or Yoiyoiyoiyama during the three evenings before the main Gion Matsuri parade).
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As evening approaches, the crowd increases.
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Side street to Minami Kannon-yama float
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Torii with lanterns lit
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They are professional hula dancers, some of the best in the world.
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Minami Kannon-yama float
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Gate to shrine
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The kumu hula is Kamana'o Anson Kauionalani or Kaui for short. He does a solo dance here. The music was performed by a wonderful Hawaiian trio called 'Ale'a.
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Minami Kannon-yama float
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Finale. Also see photos of the 2008 Ikaho Hawaiian Festival here.
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Minami Kannon-yama float and flute players
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Direct path to Taga Taisha Shrine hall
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A plastic sheet protects the tapestry from rain (it was a cloudy day)
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Lanterns at night
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Crowd on one of the main streets
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Crowd on Shijo-dori street
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Crowd and floats on Shijo-dori street as darkness sets in.
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Entertainment on stage
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Crowd and floats om Shijo-dori street 四条通り
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Minami-Kannon Yama float
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Entertainment with a dragon dance
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Minami-Kannon Yama float
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Minami-Kannon Yama float 南観音山
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Taga Taisha Lantern Festival also had some entertainment. Also see my YouTube video here.
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Girls in yukata singing in front of Minami-Kannon Yama float to attract donors.
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The public can enter the float through a small bridge connecting the float to a house.
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Dragon dance
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I went up to the 2nd floor of the house and lined up to enter the Minami-Kannon Yama float.
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People line up to enter the Minami-Kannon Yama float.
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Shishimai lion dance
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Statue of Minami-Kannon inside the house connected to the float.
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Lantern-lit path to Taga Taisha
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Statue of Minami-Kannon inside the house connected to the float.
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On the narrow bridge to the float.
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On the top deck of the float where the musicians play. It is a very small space.
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Front of the float with small taiko drums. They sit on a very narrow bench along the edges.
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Front of the float
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Bells
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A pole in the middle
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Ceiling
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Outside view from the float
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Outside view from the house connected to the float.
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Outside view from the house connected to the float.
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Bridge to the Minami-Kannon Yama float. 南観音山
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Bridge to the Minami-Kannon Yama float. 南観音山
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Bridge to the Minami-Kannon Yama float. 南観音山
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Minami-Kannon Yama float. 南観音山
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Minami-Kannon Yama float. 南観音山
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Flute players on Minami-Kannon Yama float. 南観音山
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Shijo-dori street toward Naginata float
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Shijo-dori street toward Naginata float
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Shijo-dori street and Naginata float. This area was the most crowded.
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Shijo-dori street and Naginata float. This area was the most crowded.
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Naginata float at night
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Naginata float at night
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Naginata float at night
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Huge crowd
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Robert Walker Irwin's summer residence in Ikaho, next to the Stone Steps. He was the Hawaiian Minister to Japan during the late 19th century. He coordinated the immigration of Japanese to Hawaii. ロバート W. アルウイン別邸
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In 1985, the 100th anniversary of the Japanese immigration to Hawaii, Ikaho designated this residence as one of the town's Historic Places. ハワイ王国公使別邸
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This modest building is only part of what was a larger complex of Irwin's summer residence. This is the front entrance. Open to the public, free admission.
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Robert Walker Irwin's summer villa was moved to its present and original location in fall 2013.
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If the house is boarded up like this, it's probably closed. The Irwin house is closed on Tuesdays.
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Read more about Robert Walker Irwin (1844–1925) here.
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About the "Minister's Villa of the Former Kingdom of Hawaii" ハワイ王国公使別邸 (英語がちょっと変)地元の子供達の英語教育を担当している教育委員会の英文は特にしっかりしたものにして欲しいですね。こんな英語で手本にもならないし、英語の勉強にもならない。読む外国人さんも笑わせる。
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The Irwin house and museum are open 9 am to 4:30 pm (enter by 4:15 pm). Closed Tuesdays and Dec. 28–Jan. 4.
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First floor of Robert Walker Irwin's summer residence in Ikaho. When the house was moved, it was disassembled and repaired before reassembly.
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This first floor originally had tatami mats. You still need to take off your shoes to enter.
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Robert Irwin spent his summers in Ikaho from when he bought the villa in 1891 until 1925 when he died. It was an inn when he bought it.
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Second floor has tatami mats. The second floor is open to the public only on weekends and during the hula festival in summer.
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After Irwin bought the house, he fixed it up by reinforcing the walls against earthquakes with diagonal beams.
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After Irwin died, the house was sold to Kodansha, a publishing company, and used for employee training. Eventually, the house was acquired by Gunma Prefecture and later by Ikaho/Shibukawa.
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Second floor
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View of garden from second floor.
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The Irwin house is on the left, and a small museum called the Guidance Facility is on the right.
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Map of the Irwin Park.
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Irwin house Guidance Facility, a small museum showing Irwin artifacts.
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Guidance Facility
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A young Robert Walker Irwin.
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Robert Walker Irwin in his later years. ロバート W. アルウイン. Read more about him here.A young Robert Walker Irwin ロバート W. アルウイン
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Robert Walker Irwin and wife Iki formally dressed during a visit to the Imperial Palace for an audience with the emperor. ロバート W. アルウインと妻のイキ
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Robert Walker Irwin and oldest daughter Bella. Portrait taken when they visited the US.
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Ikaho's sister-city exhibit in Machi-no-Eki building (ropeway terminal).
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Sister-city exhibit for the County of Hawaii (Big Island).
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Letter from Big Island Mayor Stephen Yamashiro proclaiming sister-city relations with Ikaho (before it merged with Shibukawa).
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The following photos (watermarked "2008") of Robert Walker Irwin's summer residence were taken before it was moved to its present location.
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In 1985, the 100th anniversary of the Japanese immigration to Hawaii, Ikaho designated this residence as one of the town's Historic Places. Map here ハワイ公使別邸
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This modest building is only part of a larger complex of Irwin's summer residence. This is the front entrance. Note that this residence has moved slightly up the Stone Steps in fall 2013.
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Rear view of Irwin's summer residence. This building has moved to a new location up the Stone Steps and these photos show it at the previous location at the foot of the Stone Steps.
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This inn called Kanzanso has been torn down to make way for the relocated Irwin house.
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Kanzanso, an inn fronting the bottom of the Stone Steps and where Irwin's summer estate was located. (No longer in existence.)
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Foyer of the Irwin summer house. A US flag, but no Hawaiian flag...
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Main room of the Irwin summer house. When these photos were taken, the house served as a museum. However, in April 2014, a new Guidance Museum next to the relocated house opened to display these artifacts. The house has no exhibits now.
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The first display case on the right shows a chronology of Irwin's life and portraits of him and his wife Takechi Iki.
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Portrait of Robert Walker Irwin and with his Japanese wife Takechi Iki who was from a samurai family.
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On the top right is a letter from Hawai'i's Governor George Ariyoshi (next image). The lower right are rocks from Kilauea volcano, and the left are souvenir ribbons marking the 100th anniversary of the first Japanese immigration in 1868.
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Letter from Hawai'i's Governor George Ariyoshi thanking Ikaho for preserving Irwin's summer home.
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The next display case includes this panel explaining Irwin's activities as Hawaiian Minister to Japan.
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The display case includes photos of the Irwin family in Ikaho.
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At center top and bottom are copies of Irwin's marriage applications. Bottom left is a news clipping announcing Irwin's marriage to Iki. Top right is a photo of the Irwins in Ikaho.
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Top left is a photo of four of Irwin's children in Ikaho. Top right is a photo of Irwin and his children in Ikaho. Bottom left is a postcard addressed to Irwin in Ikaho. Bottom right are Ikaho postcards bought by Irwin.
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Photo of of four of Irwin's children in Ikaho. The building on the right is apparently the building that remains today.
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Display panel explains Irwin's Ikaho connection. In English here.
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The display case shows an old map of Ikaho Spa on the upper left.
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Old 1902 map of Ikaho with Irwin's summer home marked by the red circle. It was in front of the bottom of the Stone Steps which cuts through the center of the town.
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1902 map close-up showing the location of Irwin's summer home (red circle) in Ikaho. It was right in front of the bottom of the Stone Steps.
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The upper left is a woodblock print showing foreigners vacationing in Ikaho in 1882. On the right is a souvenir from Ikaho that Iki bought.
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Panel explaining the Japanese immigration to Hawai'i.
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Copy of a Japanese immigrant's labor contract dated Jan. 11, 1900. (Not for Kanyaku Imin.)
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Various printed matter related to the Japanese immigration and Japanese-Americans in Hawaii, including a booklet from Lorraine Inouye, then mayor of the Big Island. Koa calabash on the right from Hilo, Hawaii to mark Ikaho's 100th anniversary in 1989
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Panel explaining Japan-Hawaii relations.
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Dishes and cutlery used in Irwin's Ikaho residence. Most were imported from Europe and the US. Some are also from Japan.
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On the left are table cloths bearing Irwin's family crest. In the middle is Irwin's binoculars, cross, and watch. On the right are cuff links and cups with the Hawaiian flag.
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On the left is a winter coat worn by wife Iki. A few lamps, hibachi heater, and furniture used in the Irwin summer residence also displayed.
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Veranda with a life-size Irwin cut-out.
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Veranda
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Panel showing Irwin's paternal family tree.
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Upper left is a Japanese letter from Bella Irwin written in roman letters. Upper right is an obituary for Robert Irwin in a Philadelphia newspaper. On the bottom left are condolence telegrams from Ikaho to Bella. Bottom right is get-well letter to Robert.
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Ink stone and brushes used by wife Iki.
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Bella Irwin established the Irwin Gakuen school and kindergarten アルウィン学園 in 1916 in Kojimachi. Today, the school is in Tokyo's Suginami Ward called Irwin Gakuen Gyokusei Hoiku Senmon Gakko.she
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Upper left is a New Year's postcard to Robert. Lower left is a funeral notice for Iki. Upper right is a family portrait.
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Family of Robert Walker Irwin. Left to right: Robert Jr., Bella, 4th daughter Agnes, Iki, 2nd son Richard, Robert, 3rd daughter Marion, and 2nd daughter Mary.
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Upper left is a photo of the Hawaiian Minister's residence in Tokyo. Lower left is a pamphlet of the Mitsui Club at the minister's residence. Upper right is a portrait of Irwin and Bella in the US.
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Panel explaining Bella Irwin's Christian Sunday School.
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Upper left is a letter from Yukiko Irwin, Bella's niece. Upper right are hymns used by Bella's Sunday School. Photo below shows Yukiko Irwin (daughter of Robert Irwin's 2nd son Richard) visiting Ikaho in 1979, meeting with a cultural property
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Letters to Bella from her Sunday School students. Lower right is a chronology of Bella's life published by her school. Her name "Irwin" is rendered in kanji characters pronounced "Ari-in." 有院
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Signboard outside the Irwin summer house. Map here Also see my list of other Japanese-American and nikkei museums in Japan here..
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As the climax of the 37th Kagurazaka Matsuri Festival, the Kagurazaka Awa Odori Dance was held on July 25-26, 2008, from 7 pm to 9 pm. These photos were taken on July 25, 2008. Crowd at Bishamonten.
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The Awa Odori is held on Kagurazaka's main street called Kagurazaka-dori, a sloping road near Iidabashi Station. 神楽坂阿波踊り
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Eighteen awa odori dance troupes danced this night.
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These dancers head to the starting point.
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The starting point was here, at the foot of the sloping Kagurazaka-dori near Iidabashi Station.
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The local Kagurazaka Awa Odori troupe is Kagura-ren. かぐら連
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Kagura-ren かぐら連
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Kagura-ren かぐら連
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Kagura-ren かぐら連
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Kagura-ren かぐら連
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Unusual to see a woman drumming a big taiko drum.
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Flute players
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The Kagura-ren dancers proceed up the sloping Kagurazaka-dori.
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Kagurazaka Awa Odori Dance 神楽坂阿波踊り
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Kagurazaka Awa Odori Dance 神楽坂阿波踊り
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だむだん連
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Damudan-ren has an easily-recognizable kimono design pattern. だむだん連
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I always see this guy at Awa Odori in Tokyo.
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Hyottoko-ren
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Kagurazaka Awa Odori Dance
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