Image search results - "ibaraki"
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Welcome to IbarakiTrain platform of Kairakuen Station.
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Higashi Mito Station (on the way to Oarai)
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Train platform of Kairakuen Station
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Oarai StationShort ride from Mito Station.
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Train platform of Kairakuen Station
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Observation tower at the beach and a symbol of Oarai
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Plum Blossom Queen at Kairakuen StationShe was passing out maps of the garden. It was a nice touch to see two of these kimono beauties greeting us.
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Ferry port (service to Otaru, Hokkaido)
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Plum Blossom Queen
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Sign saying Oarai is famous for noren curtains.
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Entrance to garden via Tokiwa Shrine. One of Japan's three most famous gardens, Kairakuen is especially noted for thousands of plum blossom trees which bloom in Feb. and March.One of Japan's three most famous gardens, Kairakuen is especially noted for thousands of plum blossom trees which bloom in Feb. and March.
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Wave breakers
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Tokiwa Shrine, MitoDedicated to Lord Mitsukuni Tokugawa, the second lord of Mito, and Nariaki Tokugawa, the ninth lord of Mito and the one who built Kairakuen Garden.
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Resort hotel
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Bonsai plum treesI bought one of these once and the flowers smelled good before they withred away. The tree also died soon afterward.
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Crowd at Higashi-mon East GateThis was the defacto main gate and most crowded since it is closest to the train station.
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The beach
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Map of Kairakuen, a garden built in 1841 by Tokugawa Nariaki (1800-1860), the ninth Lord of Mito. It is one of Japan's three most famous gardens.
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Oarai Isosaki Shrine's giant torii
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Pinickers
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Oarai Isosaki Shrine's giant torii
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Plum blossom-viewing picnickers
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Oarai town
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Red and white plum blossoms
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Oarai Isosaki Shrine torii at sea
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Oarai Isosaki Shrine torii at sea
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White plum blossoms, the most common variety, and with the sweetest aroma.
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Oarai Isosaki Shrine torii at sea
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Torii at sea
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Osaka-zuki red plum blossoms 大盃Osaka-zuki

大盃
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Shoreline
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Plum tree grove, about a week too early.
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Isosaki Shrine torii as seen from the beach
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Fantastically-shaped plum tree
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Isosaki Shrine's second giant torii
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Konan Shomu plum blossom 江南所無Prunus mume Kounanshomu
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Isosaki Shrine torii
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Plum Blossom Queens in Kairakuen, Mito
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Isosaki Shrine torii
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Plum Blossom Queens in Kairakuen, Mito
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Isosaki Shrine
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Giant votive tablet (2006 is the year of the dog)
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Plum trees and Lake Senba
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Shrine
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Plum trees and Lake Senba
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Koma-inu lion dog and lanterns
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Plum trees and Lake Senba
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Boat museum within the shrine grounds
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Path from shrine
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Torano-o plum blossom (Tiger's Tail) 虎の尾
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Seafood restaurants
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Pine trees and plum trees
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Seafood restaurants
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Plum tree grove
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Anko seafood soup (miso-based)
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Plum tree and train
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Fresh oysters
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Monument proclaiming Kairakuen as one of Ibaraki's 100 Best Sights
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Baby scallops
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Poem monument
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Ika squid
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Dried fish
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Closeup of white plum blossom
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Train back to Mito.
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Closeup of red plum blossom
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Plum grove
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Path to natural spring
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Natural spring (cold water)
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Bamboo grovePine trees, bamboo, and plum blossoms are called Shochikubai in Japanese. This trio of trees is most famous.
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Omote-mon GateThis supposed to be the front gate.
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Kobuntei Villa has exquisite Japanese-style paintings on paper sliding doors. Kobuntei is closed until early 2012 since they are repairing earthquake damage.
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Kobuntei Villa was originally built in 1842 by Tokugawa Nariaki (1800-1860), the ninth Lord of Mito. It was his summer villa.
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Kobuntei Villa, fusuma sliding door with painting of plum trees
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Kobuntei Villa, fusuma sliding door with painting of azalea
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Kobuntei Villa, fusuma sliding door with painting of fall leaves
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa, fusuma sliding door with painting of maple leaves
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa, fusuma sliding door with painting of cherry blossoms
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Kobuntei Villa
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Cherry Blossom Room, Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei suffered quite a bit of damage during the big earthquake on March 11, 2011. Repairs have started in Sept. 2011, and they hope to reopen the Kobuntei by Feb. 2012.
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View from the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
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View from the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
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View from the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
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View from the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
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Inside the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
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Inside the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
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Balcony on the top floor of Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Kobuntei Villa
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Natto fermented beans
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Kairakuen StationThis station, right before Mito Station, is open only during major flower seasons of Kairakuen.
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The Izura Coast is Kita-Ibaraki's most scenic area.
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The small red pavilion is Izura Rokkakudo (五浦六角堂), the symbol of Kita-Ibaraki. Izura Rokkakudo was originally designed and built in 1905 by artist Okakura Tenshin (岡倉天心) as part of his residence. His house is on the left..
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Tenshin used Rokkakudo to listen to ocean waves and gaze at the scenery. On March 11, 2011, it was washed away by the tsunami, but it was rebuilt in 2012.
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Izura Rokkakudo (五浦六角堂). It is now being maintained by Ibaraki University and it continues to be a sacred spot for Japanese artists.
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There's a short path going down to Rokkakudo. Small admission charged. (五浦六角堂).
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The glass windows were made in the UK.
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Inside Rokkakudo. There's supposed to be tatami mats. Great place to be, for sure.
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Scenery around Rokkakudo.
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Scenery in front of Rokkakudo.
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Artist-inspiring scenery around Rokkakudo.
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Tenshin's home on the Izura Coast, near the Rokkakudo Pavilion.
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Tenshin's home on the Izura Coast, near the Rokkakudo Pavilion. Can't go inside.
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Along the path to Rokkakudo was this bust of Harvard professor and art historian Langdon Warner (1881–1955) who once studied under Tenshin.
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He is being revered here for helping to save Kyoto and Nara from World War II bombings.
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Izura Misaki Park on the coast.
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Izura Misaki Park has this lookout tower. 五浦岬公園 展望慰霊塔
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Tenshin Memorial Museum of Art, Ibaraki. Beautiful art museum in a beautiful place on the coast.
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Tenshin Memorial Museum of Art was named after Tenshin Okakura (1863–1913 岡倉天心), an accomplished art scholar and promoter of Japanese art, especially Nihonga paintings. He was proficient in English.
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Lobby of Tenshin Memorial Museum of Art.
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Tenshin Memorial Room explained the life and achievements of Tenshin. Founded Nihon Bijutsu-in (Art Institute of Japan) and moved it from Tokyo to Izura coast in Kita-Ibaraki in 1906.Famous painter Yokoyama Taikan also followed him to Izura where he painted.
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Authored "The Book of Tea" in English in 1906.
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Movie poster for the movie, "Tenshin."
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The museum has fine views of the ocean and southern coast of Fukushima (Iwaki). You may also notice a power plant. That's not the one that had a meltdown in 2011. It's the Nakoso Power Plant (勿来発電所), a thermal power plant (non-nuclear) operated by Joban Joint Power Co., Ltd.
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Hina Matsuri dolls displayed at the museum entrance.
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Marsala restaurant near the Izura Coast. マルサーラ
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Marsala restaurant has Hawaiian decor.
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Marsala restaurant has Hawaiian decor, but no Hawaiian food. Only tropical drnks in summer.
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Appetizers. The food is good though.
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Kita-Ibaraki also has flat, sandy beaches.
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A sea wall being built. After 8 years, we hardly saw any other remnants of tsunami or quake damage.
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Tourist information center at JR Isohara Station.
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At JR Isohara Station, our tokkyu express train back to Ueno, Tokyo.
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We visited Hirakata Port, a major fishing port in Kita-Ibaraki.
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Hirakata Port has a fish market that holds a fish auction in the afternoon.
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This is a very typical fish market in Japan with a flat roof and open-air building.
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Fish auction for monkfish, a type of anglerfish.
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Monkfish (goosefish).
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Besides monkfish, other fishes are sold at auction. This is not yet a tourist attraction since we were the only outsiders there.
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Each pile of fish is one bid.
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Sea eels or anago.
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Cleaning up the fishing boat. Bycatch dumped overboard, but the birds are not picking it up.
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Oh look, something's hanging there...
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It's Kita-Ibaraki's famous fish and delicacy, monkfish, in the flesh. This one is 5 or 6 years old, weighing 12.7 kg. Only the female monkfish is eaten. The males are too small.あんこう
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Look into the big mouth and see another set of teeth on the throat. All the teeth are pointed inward so its pray cannot escape. Like the aliens in the movie "Alien."
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Monkfish being skinned and carved up by an expert chef. Since the monkfish is too slimy and slippery on a cutting board, it is cut while hung like this.
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The most prized part of the monkfish is the liver, called "ankimo."
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The white meat of monkfish.
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This is monkfish hot pot (dobojiru ankou-nabe) どぶ汁 with monkfish parts in a miso broth. I didn't have any problem eating it. The flavor was certainly not objectionable, it's just another kind of fish.
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Akatsukien onsen minshuku dining room. ¥14,000/night including dobujiru.
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Yo-soro Fishing History Museum, 5 min. by taxi from JR Otsuko Station. 北茨城市漁業歴史 資料館「よう・そろー」
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"Yo-soro" means "Go ahead" for boat navigation.
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Main exhibit is this large wooden boat used in a 200-year-old local festival called Ofune Matsuri held only once every 5 years in early May.
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Museum director tells us about the Ofune Festival.
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The museum also has display panels showing the tsunami damage suffered by Kita-Ibaraki. This is the Hirakata area. After the coastal Tohoku prefectures, Ibaraki Prefecture suffered major tsunami damage. Besides major damage along the coast, the interior areas had numerous landslides, collapsed walls, and damaged roads due to the quake.
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Since Kita-Ibaraki is closest to the Tohoku Region, it was one of the hardest-hit cities in Ibaraki by both the earthquake and tsunami (second wave around 5 meters high).Five people in Kita-Ibaraki died directly from the tsunami and one was missing. Later, five more people in Kita-Ibaraki died due to related causes. Total of 186 injured. Over 8,000 homes in Kita-Ibaraki were damaged and up to 5,000 people evacuated to emergency shelters.
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Display of all the fishes caught in Kita-Ibaraki.
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Yo-soro Museum also has this kami-shibai storytelling room. Story about British whalers who landed on Otsuhama beach in Kita-Ibaraki in May 1824 at a time when Japan had isolated itself from the rest of the world and largely barred foreigners from Japan.
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On May 28, 1824, multiple British whaling ships appeared off the coast of Otsuhama in Kita-Ibaraki. Twelve British whalers in search of provisions landed on the beach. They were captured by local authorities belonging to the Mito Clan who ruled most of what is now Ibaraki Prefecture.
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The whalers needed water and vegetables to cure the scurvy (caused by the lack of Vitamin C) that afflicted their shipmates. In early Aug., more British ships arrived that landed 55 men to seek the release of the prisoners. Also, the Mito Clan also brought in neighboring clans like the Taira Clan as reinforcement for a potential battle. Cannons were pointed at each other, but a conflict was averted by giving the whalers the water and food that sent them along their way away from Japan. In return, the whalers gave guns, spears, felt, gold, and silver as payment and had to promise not to approach Japan again.
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Onsen Minshuku Uohiko lodge near Hirakata Port. Ankou-nabe is a specialty. Recently renovated. 温泉民宿 魚彦
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Minshuku Uohiko uses natural hot spring for the bath.
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Standard size room in Minshuku Uohiko.
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Large room in Minshuku Uohiko.
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JR Isohara Station welcome sign.
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An-chan and Kou-chan mascots in Aloha shirts.
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Local pottery called Izura Tenshin-yaki started about 25 years ago. Clay called "gairome" (蛙目) found locally is used.
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We went to the Tsuchi no Yume pottery studio of Kikuchi Hidetoshi and his wife Mie. He gave us a potter-making lesson. 土の夢陶房
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First he demonstrated what we have to do.
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We each got a clump of clay, enough to make several cups or bowls.
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My works.
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Kiln
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Kikuchi's pottery.
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We were treated to refreshments served in the Kikuchis' pottery. Confection of azuki bean soup with a piece of mochi. Thank you to Hidetoshi and Mie Kikuchi (菊池 秀利・美恵) for teaching us pottery and hosting us in their beautiful, Japanese-
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Former farmhouse converted into an artist's studio and gallery called "Arigatee." (Pronounced "Arigatay".) It means "thankful."
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Arigatee is 150 years old built in the late Edo Period. It also can be for an artist in residence.
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Arigatee is being managed by Ishiwata Norio and wife Chifumi. He uses it as a artist studio. That's his painting on the wall. They moved here from Tokyo since it's cheaper and more laid back.
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At Arigatee, this is the delightful Sumi-chan, a retired local farmer. She helped cook our lunch. Rice locally grown.
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The miso soybean paste in the tonjiru pork miso soup was made by Sumi-chan (miso meijin).
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Ishiwata Chifumi and Sumi-chan.
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Our lunch awaits at Arigatee.
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Our lunch at Arigatee. Chicken drumstick, vegetables, rice, and tonjiru (pork and vegetables) soup.
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Local sake, a type called Doboroku (どぶろく) or nigori-zake (濁り酒). It's thick and cloudy-white. Sour taste. Made by a local brewer and restaurant named Masubuchi (増渕魚園).
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Former horse stable.
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Former horse stable's attic will become a gallery space.
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Chain saw sculptures.
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Silica Glass Museum. Gift shop.
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Glass Studio Silica gift shop. ガラス工房シリカ
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Glass Studio Silica main exhibition room. ガラス工房シリカ
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Glass Studio Silica.
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Gallery Salamat Po. "Salamat Po" means "Thank you" in Tagalog. (ぎゃらりー さらま・ぽ) (ぎゃらりー さらま・ぽ)
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The gallery had Hina dolls for Girl's Day.
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Materials to make our own Hina dolls. Like toothpicks and decorative flexibands.
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Very simple to make. Tie two bands into a knot, then stick the head into it.
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Tengokoro, for local gifts and products. てんごころ
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Inside Tengokoro.
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Strawberry daifuku is a specialty of Kita-Ibaraki.
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An-chan on a cup of sake.
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Karinto manju.
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Karinto manju.
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Pottery by our teacher, Kikuchi Hidetoshi and wife Mie.
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Kikuchi Hidetoshi and wife Mie.
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At Tengokoro, you can make your own dorayaki with azuki bean paste. The large spoon to pour the batter contains the perfect amount of batter.
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Make small pancake buns. The batter is different from pancake batter. A perfect brown.
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Final step, spread some azuki bean paste on the bun and make a sandwich.
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Our dorayaki teacher and store manager.
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Hanazono Gorge, a major tourist spot in Kita-Ibaraki.
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Hanazono Shrine (花園神社) is in the scenic Hanazono Gorge in the mountainous interior of the city
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Hanazone Shrine's pregnant tree, now an object of worship for wannabe mothers and pregnant mothers for a safe childbirth.
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About the pregnant tree.
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Torii
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Romon Gate
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Romon Gate
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Romon Gate
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Romon Gate
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