Image search results - "floats"
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Large crowd gather to watch the karakuri puppets perform on the ornate floats. Sign says "Watch out for pickpockets."
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Large crowd gather to watch the karakuri puppets perform on the ornate floats.
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Only four of the 12 floats have karakuri puppets which perform. Takayama Matsuri, Gifu
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The karakuri puppets first appeared on the Takayama Matsuri floats in the 18th century. They were handcrafted by artisans in Kyoto.
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Japan has three basic types of karakuri puppets based on the region: Kyoto, Nagoya, and Kanto (Tokyo area). The Takayama karakuri are the Nagoya-type.
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The puppets come out on a plank sticking out of the float and perform in a mini play with various stunts.
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Ryuujintai Karakuri 龍神台からくり
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Sanbasou Karakuri 三番叟からくり
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Sanbasou Karakuri 三番叟からくり
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Ryuujintai Karakuri 龍神台からくり
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Ryuujintai Karakuri 龍神台からくり
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Ryuujintai Karakuri, Takayama Festival, Gifu 龍神台からくり
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The karakuri perfom one float at a time.
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Shakkyoutai Karakuri which transforms into a lion dance. See the video at hidanet.ne.jp. 石橋台からくり
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Ryuujintai Karakuri 龍神台からくり
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Ryuujintai Karakuri throwing confetti. See the video at hidanet.ne.jp. 龍神台からくり
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Street lined with floats.
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Floats are displayed on the street. Takayama Matsuri, Gifu
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Superb embroidery
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Storehouse for a float. 屋台蔵
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Held on April 14, the night procession is the festival's major highlight. 夜まつり曳行
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The floats are lit and paraded on the streets.
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On Nakahashi Bridge.
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The floats cross Nakahashi Bridge.
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The Hachioji Matsuri is Hachioji's biggest event of the year. Held during the first weekend (Fri-Sun.) of Aug., it is basically a festival of ornate floats paraded around the main streets near JR Hachioji Station.
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From the Edo Period, the festival was originally held by two local shrines, the Hachiman Yakumo Shrine and Taga Shrine. Both shrines are still involved, but today the festival is more of a community event organized by a large group of local organizations.
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I went on the second day years ago, and on the third day on Aug. 9, 2009. The second day features a parade of the 19 floats. The festival attracted over 600,000 people during the three days in Aug. 2009.
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The second day also has a taiko drumming contest for the Kanto region.
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Taiko drummer at Hachioji Matsuri. She was very good.
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Taiko drummer at Hachioji Matsuri.
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In the evening on the second day of Hachioji Matsuri is a large folk dance parade called Minyo Nagashi during 4 pm to 6 pm. 民踊流し
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Minyo Nagashi folk dancing at Hachioji Matsuri, Tokyo.
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JR Hachioji Station is decorated with Hachioji Matsuri paper lanterns. The station also had a festival information booth where you could obtain free festival maps/pamphlets and information (in Jaoanese).
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JR Hachioji Station is a very busy train station.
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Near the train station is this diagonal road called "Yu Road" leading to the Koshu Kaido (Route 20) main road where the festival is held.
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Yu Road is a shopping road.
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A float procession is ready to walk down Yu Road at 5 pm.
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There are 19 floats (dashi). Nine of them belong to the Shimo-chiku area of Hachiman Yakumo Shrine in the east part of the city. And ten of them are from the west part (Kami-chiku) under Taga Shrine.
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On the Koshu Kaido main road, they started a mikoshi (portable shrine) procession from 5 pm on the third day.
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Mikoshi bearers
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All-female mikoshi bearers.
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This float had a group of tekomai women, Hachioji Matsuri.
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Tekomai at Hachioji Matsuri, Tokyo.
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During the Edo Period, the floats originally had dolls. But since the late Meiji Period, the floats have become sculptured wooden floats. Eight of the floats were lost during World War II, but they were rebuilt. So some of them look quite new.
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The floats have a masked person dancing as a fox, etc. They are messengers of the gods.
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Koshu Kaido is filled with people during the mikoshi procession.
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A girl twirling a decorative pole.
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She was doing it to music. Hachioji Matsuri.
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Hachioji Matsuri. Also see my video at YouTube.
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Flute players
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Then at 6 pm, they held a "buttsuke" meeting between a few floats which performed at an intersection. This was at the Yokoyama-tsuji intersection. ぶっつけ
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Women in yukata watching the Hachioji Matsuri.
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Sometimes two floats would meet up again and perform together.
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They pulled the floats up and down the main road.
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One traditional float featuring dolls.
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Tekomai
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Pulling a float at Hachioji Matsuri.
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One float had a group of geisha-like musicians.
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Geisha-like musicians, playing the samisen.
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Now this is the Kami-chiku (上地区) section of Koshu Kaido where more floats were being paraded. However, I noticed that there were fewer people here. It's further away from the train station.
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Two floats in Kami-chiku.
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There are always people riding on the roof of the floats.
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Shishimai lion dance, Hachioji Matsuri.
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White fox
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Back to the more crowded Shimo-chiku was a meeting of nine floats at 7:45 pm. They were together for 30 min. 山車年番送り 札の辻
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Very crowded at Hachioji Matsuri.
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Also see my video at YouTube.
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Another float procession.
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Coming down on Yu Road.
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Poster for Hachioji Matsuri in 2009.
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Takehana Matsuri is a festival of ornate floats paraded in central Hashima on May 3. Each float features a performance of puppets (karakuri) or kids dancing. The festival is coupled with the Wisteria Festival at Takehana Betsuin temple.
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My YouTube video of Takehana Matsuri showing all the performances on the floats.
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Although there are 13 floats, only about half of them take turns to appear at the festival each year. If you want to see all the float, you'll have to see the festival two years in a row.
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At the same time, the lovely Wisteria Festival is held at Takehana Betsuin temple. This main festival road leads to the temple and festival site.
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Festival started with an opening ceremony on a road near Takehana Betsuin.
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From 1 pm to 1:30 pm, all seven floats took turns to perform.
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This float had a human inside this costume of Hotei, one of the Seven Gods of Good Fortune.
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Watch my video to see and hear what they did.
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After all the floats finished performing, they started moving out to parade on other streets.
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Front wheel
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Rear wheel
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A few of the floats stopped in front of Takehana Bestuin and performed again.
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Karakuri puppet.
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This float just decorated the street.
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Floats parading near the train station.
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The Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri and Haruki Danjiri Matsuri festivals are held during the weekend before Respect for Aged Day (national holiday) which is the third Mon. in Sept. The Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri is held near Nankai Kishiwada Station (pictured).
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Hundreds of people pull and run with wooden danjiri floats around the central streets. This is the entrance of Kishiwada Ekimae-dori shopping arcade in front of the train station. These photos were taken on Sept. 19-20, 2009.
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On Sat., the first day of the festival, they pulled the danjiri floats from 6:00 am to 7:30 am in their respective neighborhoods. Then from 9:30 am to 11 am, they pull the floats along the central streets, including Kishiwada Ekimae-dori shopping arcade.
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After coming out of the Kishiwada Ekimae-dori shopping arcade, they face Nankai Kishiwada Station's west side. The procession route is mainly on the west side (ocean side) of the train tracks.
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They stop for a while, then run and turn left or right. The procession route is quite long, and you can follow it on the map they give out. Most spectators gather at several key points along the route.
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This T-intersection in front of Nankai Kishiwada Station is one good place to watch the floats go by. However, I recommend walking along the route to see other key places, especially at intersections where they turn.
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Sand bags protect the street corners from any collisions by the floats.
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Each float has two long white ropes pulled by many people, both men and women, dressed in happi coats, headband, and usually white pants.
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They run while pulling the danjiri floats while a man on the float's roof dances and prances with two fans. They pass by very quickly, unlike other float festivals. This is in front of Kishiwada Station.
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Rear view.
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There are 31 Kishiwada danjiri floats. Made of wood, they weigh about 4 tons. They consist of 300 parts, the most of any festival floats in Japan.
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Look closely and you'll see numerous intricate wood carvings. Much of them are protected by a steel netting. The oldest danjiri still in use today was built in 1840.
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The original danjiri floats were made in the 17th century by skilled craftsmen and carpenters in Kishiwada specializing in building shrines and temples.
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Some carvings depict famous battle or historical scenes.
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On Sat., after a lunch break, the danjiri again ran along the central streets from 1 pm to 5 pm. In front of the Kishiwada Ekimae-dori shopping arcade, they stopped and threw hand towels, etc., to the crowd.
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They also pop party poppers.
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Streamers from part poppers blown by the wind get caught in the power lines. The best spot to take pictures here is occupied by a police/press grandstand seen on the right with the red and white curtain.
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Most pf the danjiri festival girls had braided scalps, sometimes in a flowery pattern..
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Girls standing by to pull a danjiri float.
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It's quite a spectacle to see all these people running while pulling a rope. Amazing that no one tripped and fell down.
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Here they come in front of Kishiwada Station.
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One float released balloons.
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Each danjiri has a man (sometimes two of them) dancing up and down on the roof while the danjiri moves. This is another dramatic aspect of the festival.
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It must take a lot of skill and practice to balance yourself on a moving danjiri and dance on a sloping roof.
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Men behind the danjiri pull shorter ropes attached to a steering pole. They steer the float by pulling the ropes when necessary.
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One danjiri group wore these pointy caps. Maybe it was somebody's birthday??
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Also see my video at YouTube.
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Riding on the danjiri float at the front are three of the danjiri group's important officers. Musicians (flute players, drummers, and bell ringers) also ride and perform on the danjiri.
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My video of Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri Festival, around Nankai Kishiwada Station in Kishiwada, Osaka. Footage shot mainly near Kishiwada Castle.
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This is another part of the parade route. They are approaching an intersection called Can-Can-ba.
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Can-Can is the most popular spot to see the danjiri festival in Kishiwada. It is a T-intersection where the floats turn into the Ekimae-dori at high speed from two directions.
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Can-Can has spectator stands which charge admission, like 2,000 yen or 3,000 yen for 2 hours.
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Spectator stand (admission charged) at Can-Can intersection.
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Can-Can intersection. Danjiri from both the left and right will enter the road in the middle. カンカン場
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Danjiri at Can-Can.
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Danjiri entering Ekimae-dori at Can-Can.
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Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri
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A float stands by to enter Can-Can intersection.
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Can-Can from another angle. This goes on until 5 pm on Sat.
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From 5 pm to 7 pm, there is a break during which the danjiri floats mount paper lanterns for the night parade.
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Paper lanterns to be mounted on a danjiri float.
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The paper lanterns are lit with small electric lightbulbs powered by many car batteries. The batteries are put on the floats. They don't use power generators.
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Mounting paper lanterns on a danjiri float.
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Inside the shopping arcade, another danjiri is being mounted with paper lanterns.
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This float is ready for the night parade which is held from 7 pm to 10 pm.
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Confection in the shape of danjiri.
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From 7 pm, they start parading the danjiri floats festooned with lit paper lanterns. This is the entrance to the shopping arcade in front of Kishiwada Station.
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Unlike the daytime parade, at night they pull the danjiri slowly. No running. Slow enough for little children to pull the float's ropes.
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This float has the lanterns lit to form the kanji character for "kita" (北) in reference to the float's neighborhood (Kita-machi).
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Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri lanterns in front of Kishiwada Station.
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Kishiwada Station, west side. I stopped over in Kishiwada on Sat. night so I could see the festival the next day as well.
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On Sunday morning (Sept. 20, 2009), as I was walking toward Kishiwada Station, I saw this danjiri coming up and making a turn.
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It turned into this road, but not before it brushed against the roof of the building on the left. There was a big crumpling noise. You can see the dust near the roof.
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The roof was significantly damaged, and they just brushed aside the broken roof tiles.
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Roof damaged by danjiri float. I hope the owner had danjiri damage insurance. I heard that such accidents are unusual, but it happened right in front of me. Didn't get it on video though.
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On Sun. morning, the the danjiri parade is called "Miya-iri" which means that they are going to the shrine to be blessed. This is in front of Kishiwada City Hall on a slope called Konakara-zaka (こなから坂).
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This spot in front of city hall is very popular to view the floats passing by.
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I had a good viewing spot until these festival men kept standing in front of us. After passing by Kishiwada City Hall, the danjiri headed to Kishiwada Castle and then to the shrine.
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So I left city hall and walked to Kishiwada Castle. It's difficult to figure out which roads to walk on. Some parts of the danjiri route are closed to pedestrians, especially where there are no sidewalks. Danjiri need a wide road.
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Leaving city hall was a blessing in disguise as I was able to get great shots of the floats with Kishiwada Castle in the background.
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Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri and Kishiwada Castle
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We were blessed with a sunny day, and castles and festival floats always look best with a blue sky.
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There is a road around Kishiwada Castle, but most of it is closed to pedestrians. The police will tell you how to get to the castle if you want to go inside.
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This float had two boys on the roof.
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Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri and Kishiwada Castle
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Looks like his dad is teaching him to become a roof dancer as well. Dad holds the boy at all times.
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You may wonder if those men on the danjiri roof ever slip and fall. Well, they wear rubber-soled footwear and the roof is covered with grippy matting.
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Musicians on a danjiri float. There's a large taiko drum inside the float.
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