Last additions - HigashiOmi 東近江市
yo455-20130505-6613.jpg
Shin-Yokaichi Station looks brown from the sides, but it's green on the front.May 25, 2014
yo454-20130505-6617.jpg
Shin-Yokaichi Station platform.May 25, 2014
yo453-20130505-6623.jpg
Tourists don’t normally get off at this station since most attractions are at the next stop, Yokaichi Station.May 25, 2014
yo452-20130505-6621.jpg
Konan Railway originally operated the railway between Yokaichi and Omi-Hachiman before it merged with another company that later merged with Ohmi Railways.May 25, 2014
yo451-20130505-6624.jpg
Shin-Yokaichi Station is a Western-style, two-story wooden building built in 1913. The second floor is closed to the public due to old age. It originally housed the Konan Railway company’s head office (湖南鉄道).May 25, 2014
yo450-P1000449.jpg
Shin-Yokaichi Station on the Ohmi RailwayMay 25, 2014
yo213-20130505-6612.jpg
Ohmi Railways train at Yokaichi Station.May 25, 2014
yo399-IMG_2955.jpg
May 25, 2014
he203d-20110504_9255.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
he203b-20110504_9254.jpg
Inside Notogawa Station. The waterwheel structure houses a stairway and escalator.Apr 15, 2014
he203c-20110504_9251.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
he203-20110504_9252.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
he200a-20110504_9259.jpg
Notogawa Station, East sideApr 15, 2014
yo319-shotokuMatsuri.youtube
Best to see my Shotoku Matsuri Youtube video to hear the songs and see the dance.Apr 15, 2014
yo318-P1010628.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
yo317-P1010623.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
yo315-DSC01955.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
yo316-P1010625.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
yo314-Screen-Shot-2014-04-14-at-8_02_12-PM.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
yo313-P1010622.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
yo312-2013072720243728129.jpg
The dance begins.Apr 15, 2014
yo311-P1010612.jpg
Yokai parade led by Gao.Apr 15, 2014
yo309-P1010602.jpg
Yokaichi's connection with yokai comes from its place name "Yokaichi," a pun for "Land of Yokai." Although "Yokaichi" does not mean that.Apr 15, 2014
yo310-P1010611.jpg
The Yokai goblin parade proceeded through the Honmachi arcade.Apr 15, 2014
yo308-Screen-Shot-2014-04-14-at-7_59_14-PM.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
yo306-Screen-Shot-2014-04-14-at-7_59_49-PM.jpg
Honmachi Saturday Night Market is held on the same day as the Shotoku Matsuri. 本町土曜夜市Apr 15, 2014
yo307-Screen-Shot-2014-04-14-at-7_58_49-PM.jpg
Lots of people inside Honmachi arcade. So many people that it got quite hot. There's no real ventilation.Apr 15, 2014
yo305-P1010597.jpg
Entrance to Honmachi arcade. Apr 15, 2014
yo304-Screen-Shot-2014-04-14-at-8_00_57-PM.jpg
Soon this street perpendicular to Yokaichi Station will be filled with dancers.Apr 15, 2014
yo303-P1010603.jpg
Apr 15, 2014
yo302-P1010608.jpg
Local mascots like Gao appear on stageApr 15, 2014
yo300-P1010589.jpg
Held near Yokaichi Station in summer, the Yokaichi Shotoku Matsuri is a bon dance featuring Shiga's native Goshu Ondo folk song. 八日市聖徳まつり・江州音頭総おどりApr 15, 2014
yo301-P1010593.jpg
Yagura tower where the singers and musicians perform Goshu Ondo songs.Apr 15, 2014
he213-P1000782.jpg
Waterwheel objects on Notogawa Station's west side.Jul 01, 2013
he212-P1000780.jpg
Waterwheel objects on Notogawa Station's west side.Jul 01, 2013
he210-P1000778.jpg
Notogawa Station's west side has a shopping mall whose entrance has a waterwheel motif.Jul 01, 2013
he211-P1000779.jpg
Waterwheel objects on Notogawa Station's west side.Jul 01, 2013
he202-P1000776.jpg
Rear view of the waterwheel station as seen from the train.Jul 01, 2013
od312-odakokaikan.youtube
My video of shot on May 5, 2013 of kids visiting the kite museum and pasting wishing stickers.Jun 12, 2013
od311-20130505-6597.jpg
The little kites flew well.Jun 12, 2013
od310-20130505-6592.jpg
Kids could also make a small kite for 300 yen.Jun 12, 2013
od309-20130505-6583.jpg
Wind Goddesses posed with the kids too.Jun 12, 2013
od308-20130505-6548.jpg
After writing their wishes, kids paste their wishing stickers on the kite.Jun 12, 2013
od307-20130505-6550.jpg
After writing their wishes, kids paste their wishing stickers on the kite.Jun 12, 2013
od306-20130505-6541.jpg
Booth to buy wishing stickers for 500 yen each. Proceeds were donated for recovery efforts in Tohoku.Jun 12, 2013
od305-20130505-6542.jpg
The Higashi-Omi giant kite.Jun 12, 2013
od304-20130505-6544.jpg
Behind the ceremony is the giant kite waiting for more wishing stickers.Jun 12, 2013
od303-20130505-6539.jpg
The Wind Goddesses are like festival princesses who pray for good wind to blow to fly the giant kite.Jun 12, 2013
od302-20130505-6537.jpg
Mayor of Higashi-OmiJun 12, 2013
od300-HigashiOmiKIteNegaiFuda73.jpg
On May 5, 2013 (Children's Day), the kite museum held an event for children to write their wishes on paper stickers to be affixed on the back of the giant kite.Jun 12, 2013
od301-20130505-6535.jpg
It started with a ceremony with the mayor of Higashi-Omi and the four "Wind Goddesses."Jun 12, 2013
od219_3273.jpg
Mini theaterJun 12, 2013
od218-IMG_3223.jpg
Hikone Castle kite, displayed in 2007, the 400th anniversary of the castle.Jun 12, 2013
od217_3270.jpg
Jun 12, 2013
od216_3282.jpg
Kites from around the world.Jun 12, 2013
od215-IMG_3221.jpg
Kite from the USA, obviously.Jun 12, 2013
od214_3279.jpg
Jun 12, 2013
od213-IMG_3213.jpg
Samurai kiteJun 12, 2013
od212_3278.jpg
Okinawan dancer (yotsudake) kiteJun 12, 2013
od211_3277.jpg
Kite train, called rendako 連だこ, based on Awa Odori dancers in Tokushima Prefecture.Jun 12, 2013
od210_3281.jpg
Wind Goddess kite.Jun 12, 2013
od208_3276.jpg
Jun 12, 2013
od209-IMG_3214.jpg
An incredible variety of kites are displayed. They come from all 47 prefectures of Japan and many foreign countries.Jun 12, 2013
od207_3275.jpg
Jun 12, 2013
od206_3286.jpg
Hundreds of kites from all over Japan and the worldJun 12, 2013
od205_3283.jpg
The design is also characterized by having a pair of creatures and a Japanese kanji character. Together, they indicate a clever meaning based on word play.Jun 12, 2013
od204_3269.jpg
Giant kite displayed until 2004.Jun 12, 2013
od203-IMG_3216.jpg
What makes the kite unique is that the kite paper is carved with numerous cutouts, based on the design. It is not a solid sheet of paper.Jun 12, 2013
od202-IMG_2451.jpg
The giant kite measures about 13 high and 12 meters across, or the size of 100 tatami mats. This kite flew during 2002-2004. A new giant kite is made every three years.Jun 12, 2013
od200-IMG_6980.jpg
The Yokaichi Giant Kite Museum exhibits the city's giant kite used previously, as well as many different kites from all over Japan and the world. About 20-min. walk from Ohmi Railways Yokaichi Station. MapJun 12, 2013
od201-kite.jpg
The giant kite is replaced every three years. The previous giant kite is displayed in the museum, while the current giant kite is flown on the last Sunday in May near Echigawa River.Jun 12, 2013
gi570-20130526-6915.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi569-20130526-6912.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi568-20130526-6911.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi567-20130526-6906.jpg
Although the kite left the ground each time, it didn't stay in the air for long.Jun 05, 2013
gi566-20130526-6905.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi565-20130526-6903.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi564-20130526-6902.jpg
This is the last flight of several that day.Jun 05, 2013
gi563-20130526-6898.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi562-20130526-6896.jpg
Around 100 people pull the giant kite. Junior high and older people can sign up to pull the kite.Jun 05, 2013
gi561-20130526-6895.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi560-20130526-6891.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi559-20130526-6889.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi558-20130526-6886.jpg
Members of the Giant Kite Preservation Society pull the front of the rope.Jun 05, 2013
gi557-20130526-6885.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi556-20130526-6883.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi555-20130526-6881.jpg
The kite pullers get ready to run. A small taiko drum beats, faster and faster.Jun 05, 2013
gi554-20130526-6880.jpg
First they use long poles to prop up the giant kite.Jun 05, 2013
gi553-20130526-6877.jpg
Afternoon flying session from 2:30 pm to 3 pm when the festival ended.Jun 05, 2013
gi552-20130526-6879.jpg
Wind Goddesses fanning wind the traditional way.Jun 05, 2013
gi551-20130526-6875.jpg
Giant kite pullers.Jun 05, 2013
gi550-20130526-6691.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi549-20130526-6849.jpg
Behind Hikonyan were Nagahama's Azai sister trio (Chacha, Hatsu, and Go).Jun 05, 2013
gi548-20130526-6796.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi547-20130526-6795.jpg
Hiko-nyan kite trainJun 05, 2013
gi546-20130526-6788.jpg
Hiko-nyan kite train and hula girl arch kiteJun 05, 2013
gi545-20130526-6784.jpg
Flying trousersJun 05, 2013
gi544-20130526-6781.jpg
Kites for sale.Jun 05, 2013
gi543-20130526-6780.jpg
Stall selling kites. The long kite trains were sold out.Jun 05, 2013
gi542-20130526-6783.jpg
This is the first time they used this park for the festival. Closer to Lake Biwa so the wind should be stronger.Jun 05, 2013
gi541-20130526-6785.jpg
Taiko drummers.Jun 05, 2013
gi540-20130526-6762.jpg
Higashi-Omi has a sizable Brazilian population.Jun 05, 2013
gi539-20130526-6763.jpg
The entertainment stage provided entertainment like samba dancing and taiko drummers.Jun 05, 2013
gi538-20130526-6650.jpg
Lunch time! In the middle of the park are food booths and an entertainment stage.Jun 05, 2013
gi537-20130526-6749.jpg
The villages then started competing in kite-making and the size grew larger and larger. The giant kite they fly today is the size of 100 tatami mats (13 m x 12 m). The Higashi-Omi Giant Kite Preservation Society (東近江大凧保存会) maintains the kiJun 05, 2013
gi536-20130526-6748.jpg
Higashi-Omi's giant kite is a National Intangible Folk Cultural Property (選択無形民俗文化財) with a 300-year history. It started with villages flying kites for Boy's Day in May to celebrate the birth of a boy.Jun 05, 2013
gi535-20130526-6747.jpg
We visit the giant kite at rest. The back of the kite has many stickers written with kids' wishes.Jun 05, 2013
gi534-20130526-6736.jpg
The four Wind Goddesses pose for us. The four Wind Goddesses (風の女神) are like festival princesses and they beckon the wind to blow during the kite festival.Jun 05, 2013
gi533-DSC01677.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi532-DSC01685b.jpg
This kite's hanjimon has twin dragons that can be pronounced "shin-shin" (辰辰), a homonym for mind and body (心身). And the vermillion kanji reads "sukoyaka" (健やか), meaning good health. So the kite wishes for your "Jun 05, 2013
gi531-DSC01675.jpg
The hanjimon (判じもん) kite design always has a twin pair of creatures and a large kanji character. Together they form a thematic catch phrase.Jun 05, 2013
gi530-20130526-6735.jpg
The kite is unique for its cutout and hanjimon (判じもん) design. Jun 05, 2013
gi529-20130526-6723.jpg
Made of washi paper (from Mino, Gifu) and a bamboo frame, the giant kite measures 13 meters high and 12 meters wide and weighs 700 kg.Jun 05, 2013
gi528-20130526-6727.jpg
They were going to pull the kite across the width of the park since the way blew that way.Jun 05, 2013
gi527-20130526-6721.jpg
At sround 11:30 am, they cleared the area and brought out the giant kite (odako).Jun 05, 2013
gi526-20130526-6829.jpg
Hiko-nyan (Hikone Castle's official mascot) meets hula girls!Jun 05, 2013
gi525-20130526-6845.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi524-20130526-6713.jpg
The Awa Odori dancers also danced great in the wind. (Watch my video.)Jun 05, 2013
gi523-20130526-6871.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi522-20130526-6719.jpg
Their feet fluttered in the wind and their hips rocked left and right like real hula dancers.Jun 05, 2013
gi521-20130526-6693.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi520-20130526-6696.jpg
Needless to say, this was my favorite kite at the festival. How did they know someone from Hawaii was coming?Jun 05, 2013
gi519-20130526-6720.jpg
Huge arch kite of hula girls and Awa Odori dancers.Jun 05, 2013
gi518-20130526-6674.jpg
They're even wearing a lei and a flower in their hair!!Jun 05, 2013
gi517-20130526-6686.jpg
The hula girls were joined by Awa Odori girls from Tokushima.Jun 05, 2013
gi516-20130526-6685.jpg
Back of the hula girls.Jun 05, 2013
gi515-20130526-6660.jpg
To my delight, it was an arch kite of hula girls.Jun 05, 2013
gi514-20130526-6661.jpg
Then I stumbled across this arch kite.Jun 05, 2013
gi513-20130526-6684.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi512-20130526-6683.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi511-20130526-6670.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi510-20130526-6665.jpg
Kite trains (連凧) are the crowd favorite.Jun 05, 2013
gi509-20130526-6653.jpg
This team is from Higashi-Omi City Hall's young employees group.Jun 05, 2013
gi508-20130526-6654.jpg
Thirty teams made "mini giant kites" and competed in kite design (図柄) and flying (飛揚). They went on the outdoor stage for kite design judging.Jun 05, 2013
gi507-20130526-6771.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi506-20130526-6645.jpg
About 30 teams competed in kite-flying and design contests.Jun 05, 2013
gi505-20130526-6648.jpg
The kites are the size of two tatami mats.Jun 05, 2013
gi504-20130526-6769.jpg
Kite-flying contest.Jun 05, 2013
gi503-20130526-6754.jpg
Jun 05, 2013
gi501-20130526-6639.jpg
Free shuttle buses ran from JR Notogawa Station to the park which had no public parking. Jun 05, 2013
gi502-20130526-6779.jpg
The festival name changed from Yokaichi Odako Matsuri to Higashiomi Odako Matsuri in May 2012 and the festival site changed in May 2013 to Fureai Undo Koen Park. MapJun 05, 2013
gi499-higashiomiodako.youtube
The Higashi-Omi Giant Kite Festival (Higashi-Omi Odako Matsuri) is held on the last Sunday of May at Fureai Undo Park (ふれあい運動公園) in Notogawa, HigashiOmi, Shiga. The main highlight is the giant kite, flying at 11:30 am and 2:30 pm.My video of the Higashi-Omi Giant Kite Festival on May 26, 2013.Jun 05, 2013
gi500-20130526-6636.jpg
Also see kite-flying contests, exotic kites from around Japan, and stage entertainment. Anybody can fly a kite too. From 10 am to 3 pm. Jun 05, 2013
ib374-20110504_9510.jpg
About the Iba Goten Palace. 伊庭御殿遺跡Jun 29, 2011
ib372-20110504_9504.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib373-20110504_9508.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib370-20110504_9505.jpg
The palace seems to have had a large spread. The palace is known to have been designed by Kobori Enshu, a famous artist from Shiga. The place is now used as a park.Jun 29, 2011
ib371-20110504_9506.jpg
Small monument at Iba Goten.Jun 29, 2011
ib368-20110504_9501.jpg
Near the Sanposan Shrine is the site of the Iba Goten Palace.Jun 29, 2011
ib369-20110504_9502.jpg
The Iba Goten Palace was a rest house for shoguns traveling between Tokyo and Kyoto during the early Tokugawa Period. 伊庭御殿遺跡Jun 29, 2011
ib367-20110504_9282.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib366-20110504_9499.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib365-20110504_9493.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib364-20110504_9492.jpg
Looks like the mikoshi storehouse.Jun 29, 2011
ib363-20110504_9488.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib362-20110504_9487.jpg
Sanposan Shrine near the bottom torii.Jun 29, 2011
ib361-20110504_9491.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib360-20110504_9489.jpg
The three mikoshi are being readied for their next destination at another shrine nearby.Jun 29, 2011
ib359-20110504_9496.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib358-20110504_9479.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib357-20110504_9495.jpg
They put the ornaments back on.Jun 29, 2011
ib356-20110504_9478.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib354-20110504_9459.jpg
Shrine musicians play as the mikoshi arrive.Jun 29, 2011
ib355-20110504_9483.jpg
They undo the ropes covering the mikoshi.Jun 29, 2011
ib353-20110504_9474.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib352-20110504_9462.jpg
All three mikoshi are placed near the torii,Jun 29, 2011
ib350-20110504_9454.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib351-20110504_9458.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib349-20110504_9449.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib348-20110504_9448.jpg
After hitting the paved road, they carry the mikoshi to a place nearby.Jun 29, 2011
ib347-20110504_9443.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib346-20110504_9435.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib345-20110504_9432.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib344-20110504_9430.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib343-20110504_9425.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib342-20110504_9423.jpg
The third and red mikoshi Ninomiya passes through the torii. 二の宮Jun 29, 2011
ib341-20110504_9418.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib340-20110504_9403.jpg
The second mikoshi Hachioji hits the pavement.Jun 29, 2011
ib339-20110504_9400.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib338-20110504_9393.jpg
The third mikoshi, called Ninomiya, passes through the torii. 二の宮 Jun 29, 2011
ib337-20110504_9385.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib336-20110504_9380.jpg
The second mikoshi, called Hachioji, passes through. 八王子Jun 29, 2011
ib335-20110504_9379.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib334-20110504_9376.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib333-20110504_9370.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib332-20110504_9366.jpg
Two people behind the mikoshi hold ropes attached to the mikoshi.Jun 29, 2011
ib331-20110504_9362.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib329-20110504_9355.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib330-20110504_9356.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib328-20110504_9353.jpg
The second mikoshi, called Hachioji, passes through. 八王子Jun 29, 2011
ib327-20110504_9345.jpg
They sing a song as they drag the mikoshi. It's a contsant stop-and-go process.Jun 29, 2011
ib326-20110504_9331.jpg
The Sannomiya mikoshi passes in front of us as they dragged it down the rocky slope. People do get hurt. I saw one guy who had hurt his foot, but was able to walk back down the mountain while accompanied by a fireman.Jun 29, 2011
ib325-20110504_9326.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib324-20110504_9325.jpg
The first mikoshi called Sannomiya finally arrives near the bottom.Jun 29, 2011
ib323-20110504_8589.youtube
My YouTube video of the Iba-no-saka-kudashi Matsuri.Jun 29, 2011
ib322-20110504_9417.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib321-20110504_9416.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib320-20110504_9312.jpg
Three costumed boys wait right beyond the torii.Jun 29, 2011
ib319-20110504_9305.jpg
As the first mikoshi's scheduled arrival time nears, more people gather and climb the slope.Jun 29, 2011
ib318-20110504_9303.jpg
A shrine priest in full dress climbs down to my amazement.Jun 29, 2011
ib317-20110504_9299.jpg
The kids are not afraid at all of the steep slope. The secret is to travel light. I was too bogged down with camera equipment and decided to stay near the bottom torii which tends to get most crowded.Jun 29, 2011
ib316-20110504_9298.jpg
Quite a few people climbed up, and they seemed to be locals who have been climbing up the mountain a number of times even with young kids in hand.Jun 29, 2011
ib315-20110504_9297.jpg
If you want to climb up the slope to see the mikoshi at higher-up rough spots, you have to climb up. Jun 29, 2011
ib314-20110504_9291.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib313-20110504_9289.jpg
It makes you wonder how they can carry a heavy mikoshi down such a steep and rough slope. Jun 29, 2011
ib312-20110504_9286.jpg
Jun 29, 2011
ib311-20110504_9279.jpg
About the Ibanosaka-kudashi Matsuri.Jun 29, 2011
ib310-20110504_9280.jpg
A few shrine buildings near the bottom torii.Jun 29, 2011
ib309-20110504_9273.jpg
The torii is right on the bottom of the steep and rocky mountain slope.Jun 29, 2011
ib308-20110504_9278.jpg
People start to gather near the bottom torii, a point called Sakashita (Slope Bottom). 坂下Jun 29, 2011
ib307-20110504_9272.jpg
Those rough spots can be exceptionally steep or difficult to pass for the men carrying the mikoshi portable shrine down the mountain. It's only 500 meters, but very steep and rocky.Jun 29, 2011
ib306-20110504_9271.jpg
Rough timetable of the three portable shrines being hauled down the steep mountain. There are several points of interest (rough spots which are all named) and the approximate times when they will pass by.Jun 29, 2011
ib305-20110504_9268.jpg
Area around the bottom torii of Sanposan Shrine. MapJun 29, 2011
ib304-20110504_9267.jpg
They carry the three mikoshi portable shrines up to Sanposan Shrine atop the mountain on May 3, the day before the festival on May 4. The god's spirit is then transferred to the mikoshi. One mikoshi is already on the ground.Jun 29, 2011
ib303-20110504_9511.jpg
Some Jizo statues along the way to Sanposan Shrine from Notogawa Station.Jun 29, 2011
ib302-20110504_9512.jpg
Part of Sanposan Shrine can be seen atop on Kinugasa-yama. The festival is related to the Junishi Chinese zodiac. They sing about the dragon going up the mountain and slithering down as a snake.Jun 29, 2011
ib300-20110505_9516.jpg
Held on May 4 by Sanposan Shrine in Higashi-Omi, Shiga Prefecture, Iba-no-saka-kudashi Matsuri has three portable shrines hauled down a steep mountain (Kinugasa-yama) for about 500 meters. Jun 29, 2011
ib301-20110504_9513.jpg
View of the bottom torii of Sanposan Shrine (繖峰三神社) on Kinugasa-yama (繖山) 432 meters high. (As seen from the train on the JR Tokaido Line. This torii is 15-min. walk from JR Notogawa Station. 繖峰三神社)Jun 29, 2011
yo406-IMG_6978.jpg
Sister city monument at Higashi-Omi City Hall.Sep 05, 2009
yo405-IMG_6976.jpg
Higashi-Omi City Hall Sep 05, 2009
yo209-IMG_3042.jpg
Chokotto bus ちょこっとバスSep 05, 2009
yo207-IMG_7246.jpg
Ohmi Railways Yokaichi Station 近江鉄道八日市駅Sep 05, 2009
yo404-IMG_6977.jpg
Higashi-Omi City Hall Sep 05, 2009
yo208-IMG_7248.jpg
Mural at Ohmi Railways Yokaichi StationSep 05, 2009
100-20080525_4478.jpg
On May 25, 2008 at the Yokaichi Giant Kite Festival, the new giant kite was flown for the first time. The wind conditions was good.May 31, 2008
101-20080525_4483.jpg
The kite flew quite high for about 3 min. 35 sec. Also see my YouTube video here.May 31, 2008
102-20080525_4498.jpg
It had rained the night before and in the morning. The ground would've been muddy, but they spread a layer of rocks to make the ground dry. It must have been hard to pull the kite and run on these rocks.May 31, 2008
103-20080525_4501.jpg
After the flight, we could see the kite up close. A sacred sakaki tree branch adorned the back of the kite. Also many paper stickers with people's wishes were pasted on the back.May 31, 2008
094-IMG_7218.jpg
The paper flaps are applied with paste and then folded over the bamboo rod.Sep 14, 2007
095-IMG_7231.jpg
See the paper flaps pasted over the edge.Sep 14, 2007
096-IMG_7241.jpg
Sep 14, 2007
097-IMG_7233.jpg
Almost finished. This paper cutting step took 3 days to complete.Sep 14, 2007
092-IMG_7229.jpg
Wing portion after paper cutting.Sep 14, 2007
090-IMG_7207.jpg
Sep 14, 2007
091-IMG_7211.jpg
Wing portion before paper cutting.Sep 14, 2007
093-IMG_7215.jpg
How they do it: First they cut along the outline of the picture leaving ample space. Then they cut it perpendicular to the edge to make paper flaps.Sep 14, 2007
088-IMG_7200.jpg
The bamboo grid was temporarily fixed with weights and some tape.Sep 14, 2007
089-IMG_7192.jpg
Intricate bamboo grid/frame fitting all shapes along the edges.Sep 14, 2007
087-IMG_7190.jpg
The bamboo grid is carefully aligned with the kite design.Sep 14, 2007
086-IMG_7188.jpg
Aug. 5, 2007: Paper cutting 切り抜き Kiri-nuki. First they reversed the kite paper so the bottom side was up. Then they re-installed the bamboo grid as shown here.Sep 14, 2007
085-IMG_7023.jpg
Group photo. Quite a few people worked during this 3-hour afternoon session.Aug 02, 2007
083-IMG_7013.jpg
Still more tying to do.Aug 02, 2007
082-IMG_7015.jpg
Besides the diagonal grid of bamboo rods, a bamboo rod is also fastened along the edges of the design where the paper will be cut out (or carved out). These bamboo rods keep the edges of the cut-out paper taut. Otherwise it would flap around in the wind.Aug 02, 2007
084-IMG_7025.jpg
Tying the bamboo frame is considered to be one of the more tedious tasks, so we were rewarded with a pair of gloves with the kite design. These gloves will also give us higher priority to pull the kite during the kite festival.Aug 02, 2007
081-IMG_6997.jpg
Aug 02, 2007
079-IMG_7009.jpg
WingAug 02, 2007
078-IMG_7005.jpg
Hawk eye painted.Aug 02, 2007
080-IMG_7010.jpg
Aug 02, 2007
077-IMG_6995.jpg
Bamboo rods and sticks.Aug 02, 2007
075-IMG_7018.jpg
The bamboo frame work is done after the kite design is painted.Aug 02, 2007
074-IMG_6993.jpg
This intricate bamboo frame supports the kite paper so it does not flap around like normal paper.Aug 02, 2007
076-IMG_6989.jpg
Aug 02, 2007
679 files on 3 page(s) 1