Last additions - Kurayami Matsuri Festival くらやみ祭り
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The giant taiko later paraded along the Keyaki road.May 28, 2014
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Kurayami Matsuri: The mikoshi would spend the night at the Otabisho. At 4 am the next morning, they were carried back to the shrine by 7:30 am.May 28, 2014
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Police constantly warned people about stepping back.May 28, 2014
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All the mikoshi were brought here amid much fanfare.May 28, 2014
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The action and crowds shift to the Otabisho seen in the background.May 28, 2014
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Eight mikoshi proceeded from Okunitama Shrine to the Otabisho.May 28, 2014
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Third mikoshi was Sannomiya 三之宮 Hikawa no Okami 氷川大神 氷川大社 埼玉県大宮市鎮座 (延喜式内 名神大社・旧官弊大社).May 28, 2014
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Second mikoshi was Ninomiya 二之宮 Ogawa no Okami 小河大神 二宮神社(小河神社) 東京都あきる野市鎮座 (旧郷社).May 28, 2014
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The first mikoshi was Ichinomiya. 一之宮 Ono no Okami 小野大神 小野神社 東京都多摩市鎮座 (延喜式内論社・旧郷社)May 28, 2014
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Each mikoshi was led by paper lantern bearers.May 28, 2014
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Watch the video to see how they beat the taiko.May 28, 2014
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The giant taiko drums appeared again to purify the path for the mikoshi portable shrines.May 28, 2014
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Also see my Kurayami Matsuri video taken on May 5, 2014.May 28, 2014
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The formal procession started with some musicians.May 28, 2014
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Sacred music gagaku musicians.May 28, 2014
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The mikoshi bearers arrived dancing in circles.May 28, 2014
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On May 5 at 6 pm, the festival climaxes with six large taiko drums followed by eight mikoshi portable shrines carried to the Otabisho, a short distance away pictured here.. May 28, 2014
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People couldn't cross the road.May 28, 2014
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I went back to Fuchu the next day on May 5, 2014, the festival climax. Very crowded in front of the shrine.May 28, 2014
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Mando flower umbrella displayed in a dept store.May 28, 2014
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On May 4 during the day, they had children carrying small mikoshi. They also had twirling flower umbrellas called mando 万灯.May 28, 2014
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On May 4, the float parade ended at about 9 pm.May 28, 2014
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People cheer whenever they tilt this danjiri float.May 28, 2014
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Kurayami Matsuri in Fuchu, TokyoMay 28, 2014
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They play the flute (笛), shime-daiko drum (締太鼓), large taiko (大太鼓), hand bell (鉦), and wooden clappers (拍子木). The flutist is like the music conductor who directs the music.May 28, 2014
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The festival music is called Fuchu Hayashi (府中囃子) native to Fuchu. There are two schools: Meguro-ryu (lively music west of the shrine) and Funabashi-ryu (elegant music east of the shrine).May 28, 2014
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Floats on Keyaki road.May 28, 2014
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The floats later paraded on the tree-lined Keyaki road.May 28, 2014
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The road is not that long so it was easy to see all the floats.May 28, 2014
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Floats would meet up and perform together for a few minutes.May 28, 2014
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Shishimai lion dancers.May 28, 2014
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Each float was led by paper lantern bearers followed by people pulling the float.May 28, 2014
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This unusual float named Kotobuki-cho is a danjiri float whose front end has to be lifted to turn.May 28, 2014
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Comical dancers wearing masks performed on the floats.May 28, 2014
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From 6 pm to 9 pm on May 4, 22 ornate wooden floats carrying musicians and dancers paraded on the street in front of the shrine (山車の巡行).May 28, 2014
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The floats carry festival musicians and dancers wearing a mask.May 28, 2014
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At around 6 pm, the ornate floats started to appear.May 28, 2014
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The taiko drums are beaten to purify the path for the mikoshi portable shrine.May 28, 2014
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That's how the taiko got bigger and bigger.May 28, 2014
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The largest taiko is made of bubinga wood. They even made another taiko from the wood carved out of this trunk. May 28, 2014
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In the old days, they used to ram the taiko drums at each other. Since a bigger taiko was more advantageous, four neighborhoods sought to make the largest drum.May 28, 2014
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Men standing precariously on one of the smaller taiko drums. They hold on to a rope tied to the drum. The smallest taiko is 1.29 meter wide. Up to 11 people stand on it.May 28, 2014
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Another taiko arrives.May 28, 2014
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Local TV reporter.May 28, 2014
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On May 4 from 5 pm to 6 pm, large taiko drums (太鼓の響宴) were beaten on the street near the shrine.May 28, 2014
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The floats started to gather.May 28, 2014
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Giant taiko drum beating like the sound of dinosaur footsteps.May 28, 2014
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Giant taiko ahead next to the torii.May 28, 2014
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Mikoshi at the shrine await.May 28, 2014
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The main god is Okunitama-no-Okami, god of nation-building. Same god as Izumo Taisha.May 28, 2014
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Okunitama Shrine's Honden in Fuchu, Tokyo. The shrine was established in 111 by Emperor Keiko (景行天皇). It worships six deities from Musashino Province. May 28, 2014
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About Okunitama ShrineMay 28, 2014
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Wash basin to purify yourself.May 28, 2014
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First a giant taiko drum passed by me as I was going to the shrine.May 28, 2014
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Best to watch my video of Kurayami Matsuri on May 4, 2014.May 28, 2014
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Crowded path to Okunitama Shrine.May 28, 2014
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Okunitama Shrine's toriiMay 28, 2014
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Keyaki-dori road of trees leading to Okunitama Shrine.May 28, 2014
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Today, the festival is well lit in the evening with paper lanterns. On May 4 from 5 pm to 6 pm, large taiko drums (太鼓の響宴) are beaten on the street. May 28, 2014
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It was pitch dark because humans were not allowed to see the god's divine spirit being transferred from the shrine to the mikoshi and transported to the Otabisho rest place.The festival is near Fuchu Station on the Keio Line.May 28, 2014
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The Kurayami Matsuri is Okunitama Shrine's most important festival held annually on April 30-May 6 in Fuchu, Tokyo. The main festival days are May 4 and 5. Kurayami means "pitch dark" in reference to it originally being a night festival.May 28, 2014
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