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Rear view of birth home of Yoshida Togo who was a famous geographer of Japan who compiled an encylopedia of Japanese place names. His son was Yoshida Chiaki who composed the melody of the song "Biwako Shuko no Uta" (Lake Biwa Rowing Song).1 comments03/05/13 at 03:50Guest_John Waller: I was lucky enough to visit Niigata whilst in the ...
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Two crab mascots to promote Kasumi, Hyogo Pref. On the left is Matsuba-kun (male, wearing a blue cap), and on the left is Kasumi-chan, a female crab with a yellow ribbon. Not sure if they're married. Crabs are a major product of Kasumi.松葉くん (ï1 comments02/14/13 at 20:45Guest_lil cp: how much will you sell that mascot for?
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1 comments01/19/13 at 17:00Guest_Eric hodge: Harry cardoza and i made the independence sign dur...
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Shibuya Station, Hachiko statue6 comments10/04/12 at 21:04Guest_Uve: People can learn a lot from you Hatchiko. May you ...
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1 comments09/13/12 at 03:57Guest_よし: 喜ぶ
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About the Tokyo Motor Show...Makuhari Messe is near Kaihin Makuhari Station on the Keiyo and Musashino Lines. The huge show occupies the entire Makuhari Messe consisting of the North, East, Center, and West Halls, and Event Hall. Admission was 1200 yen. The show sees over 1.4 million visitors.

Although this is called the 39th Tokyo Motor Show in 2005, the first motor show was held in 1954 and called the 1st All-Japan Motor Show. The venue was Hibiya Park in Tokyo. In 1964, the show was renamed "Tokyo Motor Show." The show was held annually until 1973 when the oil shock occurred. It was so severe that organizers decided to hold the show every other year. No show was held in 1974. From 1975, the show was held every other year. 2005 is actually the 50th anniversary of the motor show.

In 1958, the venue changed to Korakuen Bicycle Racing Stadium. Also in 1958, the date was changed from spring (April-May) to fall (Oct.-Nov). In 1959, the venue was switched to Harumi at the domed Tokyo International Trade Center where it would remain until 1987 when it moved to Makuhari Messe in 1989. In 1970, foreign automakers participated in the Tokyo Motor Show for the first time.

In 1999, the show combined passenger cars and motorcycles. Also, in 1999, the show for commercial vehicles was omitted and instead to be held in a separate show in alternating years starting in 2000. The motor show for passenger cars and motorcycles would continue to be held every two years from 1999. So there would be a Tokyo Motor Show every year, but the purpose would alternate between passenger cars/motorcycles and commercial vehicles.

During the 1st motor show in 1954, when most of the vehicles displayed were for commercial use, the attendance was 547,000. In 1963, it exceed 1 million over 16 days. It hovered around 1.4 million in the years following. The record attendance was attained in 1991 with over 2 million visitors during 15 days. In 2003, the total attendance was 1.424 million.

In 2000, at the first Tokyo Motor Show dedicated to commercial vehicles, attendance was a mere 177,900 over 5 days. In 2004, attendance was 248,600 over 6 days.

The ubiquitous female companions, attendants, or models that we see today started appearing at the show from as early as 1957. They do not only decorate the show, but they also reflect the fashion of the times. Their hairstyles, wardrobe, skirt length, make-up, etc. The Tokyo Motor Show is not only a showcase for cars, it is also a fashion showcase. Therefore, in this online photo gallery, you will see not only cars, but also women. Enjoy!
1 comments09/02/12 at 22:28Guest_richard sterry: sugoi desu.
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Shibuya Station, Hachiko statue6 comments08/04/12 at 22:55Guest_Dhodz: The story of hachico made me cry.u inspire people ...
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Shibuya Station, Hachiko statue6 comments08/02/12 at 15:18Guest_joey a filipino: Me too, hatchiko story touch my heart, may the goo...
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Hishi Gate, Important Cultural Property. Pass though this large gate to proceed to the Ni no Maru compound. 菱門1 comments06/12/12 at 00:35Guest_bob: lovely
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With buckets and water testing kits, they do their testing.1 comments04/15/12 at 17:08Guest_Bill: very good!
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Yodobashi Camera store on west side of Sapporo Station.2 comments04/15/12 at 05:42Guest_Bill: very good!
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Hydrangea at Takahata Fudoson temple, Hino, Tokyo2 comments04/13/12 at 04:08Guest_Bill: very good!
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Yodobashi Camera store on west side of Sapporo Station.2 comments04/12/12 at 15:43Guest_Bill: very good!
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Hydrangea at Takahata Fudoson temple, Hino, Tokyo2 comments03/18/12 at 22:08Guest_Bill: very good!
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1967 Buick Riviera looking like a manta ray.1 comments03/17/12 at 01:48Guest_Bill: very good!
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Honolulu Advertiser newspaper from Hawaii featuring a photo of a ninja from Koka who performed at Ala Moana Shopping Center in 1990.1 comments01/23/12 at 09:17Guest_Taeko: Great!!!
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Ninja looked at a cat's eyes to find out what time it was. If the iris was almost closed, it was noon. If dilated, it was late at night. Must've been troublesome to find and snatch a cat to find out what time it was.1 comments01/23/12 at 09:11Guest_Taeko: I felt fantastic and intelligent, ninjas know the ...
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Ninja house attic showing the thatched roof.1 comments01/23/12 at 09:09Guest_Taeko: I suppose that the ninjas were solitary
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Hearth with a escape hatch at the bottom. A tour guide shows you the gimmicks of the house.1 comments01/23/12 at 09:06Guest_Taeko: we talked and took pictures with him too
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The Ninja house was built in 1842. There is a guide (dressed in ninja costume) inside to show you around.1 comments01/23/12 at 09:05Guest_Taeko: ninja house is fantastic, I loved a lot. the nijas...
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Shinobi Shrine has a statue of Daikokuten, one of the seven gods of good fortune. He is worshipped for good marriage, food, and prosperity. Made during the early Edo Period, it's Japan's largest wooden statue of Daikokuten. 大黒天1 comments01/23/12 at 09:00Guest_Taeko: I went this fantastic place with my italian friend...
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Tamagawa Josui Aqueduct1 comments01/08/12 at 08:57Guest_Rob: Great set, Phil. I have linked to this set from s...
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Japanese belly dancers at Noge Daidogei in Yokohama.1 comments12/23/11 at 15:19Guest_Chin: Nice
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Daihatsu2 comments12/12/11 at 08:26Guest_nice: nice girl
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Takeinadane-no-Mikoto1 comments10/14/11 at 17:36Guest_jose dilson: tenho admiração
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Barack Obama at Fussa Tanabata Matsuri, Tokyo. A very good likeness.1 comments10/08/11 at 01:59Guest_samansa (...): Lol, wut
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Michael Jackson tribute in Aug. 2009, Fussa Tanabata Matsuri, Tokyo. Very good likeness.1 comments10/08/11 at 01:54Guest_SAMANTHAALOWY: omg, micheal jackson. so hawt.
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Tanabata decorations on the west side of Fussa Station.1 comments10/08/11 at 01:52Guest_SAMANTHALOWY: SO PRO AND HOT
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1 comments09/25/11 at 21:20Guest_sompong: very good
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1 comments09/17/11 at 11:37Guest_nuwan: Sugoi boku wa mitan des kedo sugoi tanoshi katta N...
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I give her my Best Babe and Best Costume Awards for Tokyo Marathon 2010.1 comments09/16/11 at 23:07Guest_seporf: Yes Very good
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Shibuya Station, Hachiko statue6 comments08/15/11 at 09:49Guest_Thomas Francis: I love this Dog very much...You teached me a good ...
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Shelf for beckoning cats, maneki neko. Gotokuji temple, Setagaya, Tokyo.1 comments07/30/11 at 22:45Guest_Loryane: It is impressive all these maneki-neko!
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Prayers for a child written on these votive tablets (ema)1 comments07/11/11 at 12:23Guest_Patrick Drazen: The child on the plaques is from one of Japan'...
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Elizabeth portable shrine was donated by a drag queen club called Elizabeth Kaikan in Kameido, Tokyo.There are three portable shrines (called mikoshi). The Kanamara mikoshi (the original portable shrine), Kanamara-bune mikoshi (shaped like a boat), and Elizabeth mikoshi (pink giant). All three are carried during a procession around town. The Elizabeth mikoshi is carried by she-males. ("New half" in Japanese. Go ahead and laugh if you want.)1 comments07/11/11 at 11:54Guest_Patrick Drazen: That painting in front--that's a cartoon of t...
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The new Toyosato Elementary School building.1 comments07/02/11 at 10:20Guest_JSIM: I'll send my children to study there!
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Study desks inside public library. They face a window with a view of the new Toyosato Elementary School building.1 comments07/02/11 at 10:19Guest_JSIM: Very impressive!
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Public library in old Toyosato Elementary School. The renovations are very impressive.1 comments07/02/11 at 10:18Guest_JSIM: I wonder if there's K-ON! manga...
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View from the podium in the school auditorium. It looks like that they still use this auditorium.1 comments07/02/11 at 10:10Guest_JSIM: Great photo, I love it!
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End stairway with wash basin.1 comments07/02/11 at 10:05Guest_JSIM: I hope to visit that place at least once in my lif...
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This is one of two rooms in the building which has been reconstructed as a classroom for display purposes.1 comments07/02/11 at 10:02Guest_JSIM: I'd like they really use it to teach!
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Yoshino Tayu, a high-ranking geiko entertainer. 吉野太夫1 comments06/29/11 at 13:29Guest_Name: Hello I was just looking for picture of Yoshinoday...
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Shibuya Station, Hachiko statue6 comments06/20/11 at 10:44Guest_DHOY: I love dogs, that why I really really "LIKE Y...
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When Wright found out that Bunkichi was a fellow Pennsylvania University graduate, he fully supported the preservation of the property. They saved the property by converting it into a museum. A foundation was established and the property was donated to itPictured is Ralph Wright and Itoh Bunkichi VIII (1927- ), the son of Bunkichi VII (1896-1958).1 comments05/26/11 at 06:31Guest_Joan Itoh Burk: How lovely to see this article and see the fruit o...
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Okinawan kimono called the bingata, perhaps Okinawa's most famous kimono. The design is made by applying dyes through a stencil.It was originally worn by Okinawa's royal family members. It is now the costume of a slow-moving Okinawan dance called "Yotsudake."
Model: Maki Uyeunten
1 comments04/27/11 at 15:29Guest_lori obrien: wow
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The Wedded Rocks are actually a type of torii gate for worshipping the Okitama Sacred Stone in the ocean.1 comments04/08/11 at 10:18Guest_george Himelright: I was stationed in the asikan there. in 194801950...
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A tsunami trap if I ever saw one.1 comments03/12/11 at 12:51Guest_George Peacock: The day after the tsunami, I fear this was a horri...
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Entrance to Northern Culture Museum, formerly the Japanese-style mansion of the Ito farming family who were a wealthy landowner from the 18th century.1 comments03/12/11 at 03:01Guest_Jim Leech: As a child my family lived with on the Ito Family ...
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Shibuya Station, Hachiko statue6 comments02/10/11 at 14:07Guest_jen: Hachiko! Your story inspire me...
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Sikorsky H-192 comments02/07/11 at 18:31philbert: I don't know of any museum which has it.
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Sikorsky H-192 comments02/02/11 at 10:10Guest_Hal: Do you know of any Museum having a Mitsubishi G4M ...
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1 comments01/28/11 at 23:44Guest_Francisco Baquin: Es gusto recordar bellos mometos vividos en Japon,...
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Daihatsu2 comments01/17/11 at 22:46Guest_khan: love every girl
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Panoramic shot1 comments01/03/11 at 19:15Guest_Belle: Kirei! Iris matsuri ha itsu desu ka.
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Another view from the top of the bridge in 1997. Sadly, it doesn't bloom like this anymore.1 comments01/01/11 at 03:54Guest_DINESH VORA: FANTASTIC FLOWER AND FRAGRANCE
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Going through the trap door.1 comments12/29/10 at 22:14Guest_manu: Naruto ninja girl ^^
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1 comments12/19/10 at 00:46Guest_Pleagres: (...) Hello,

This was an enjoyable read. I enjoye...
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Another traditional-looking building is this Building 101. Univ.of Tokyo, Komaba Campus1 comments12/09/10 at 11:58Guest_chamara: i like to loin this unversity
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Goeido Founder's Hall1 comments12/06/10 at 05:46Guest_James Guy: Incredible
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Giant Kannon statue in the distance.1 comments11/11/10 at 16:27Guest_chipslin: Would you like to write something on wikipedia for...
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Harley-Davidson FLST Heritage SoftailWorld premiere of this bike.1 comments11/06/10 at 13:24Guest_jack: รถก็สวยคนก็โอ
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After you pass through the Niomon Gate, this is what you see.1 comments11/04/10 at 08:48Guest_Lozzi: WOW! that's truly GORJUZZ!
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Rear view of the shiranui style of tying the rope.He turned in all four directions to show everyone what it looked like. This is what is called the shiranui style of tying the rope. It is characterized by a single loop in the back. The other style, called unryu, has twin loops.1 comments09/24/10 at 15:39Guest_Andy: Actually this is the unryu style, while the shiran...
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Nihon Seimei Bldg. collapsed at the middle, near Sannomiya Station. It's hard to imagine what would've happened if the quake struck during working hours with people working in this building.1 comments09/22/10 at 06:37Guest_miley: nice pic
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1 comments09/10/10 at 05:09Guest_Francisco Baquin: Soy de Guatemala, es algo agradable recordar el Mi...
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Horyuji and World Heritage Site (Japan's first) marker1 comments08/26/10 at 20:11Guest_caprice minehan: these pictures are beautiful i love them
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The folded right leg symbolizes quiet meditation.1 comments08/20/10 at 01:56Guest_Anna: It is a great monument.I have never seen it befo...
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1 comments08/08/10 at 19:06Guest_Gary: I have collection of 6 oil painted postcards very...
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Spain (nice facade)1 comments07/03/10 at 07:04Guest_виталий: хочу найти павильон украины
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Ota Dokan, initial builder of Edo Castle. This is played by Shun'ichi Suzuki, the then governor of Tokyo. Body guards were around his float. He is dressed in a hunter's costume. Behind him is an attendant named Yamabuki.江戸開祖 太田道灌、従者・山吹娘1 comments06/26/10 at 23:48Guest_Gri: Actually, it' snot an attendant called "...
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Wartime Mitsui Life Insurance ad card. Dated Feb. 1942, this advertising postcard shows a Japanese torpedo bomber dropping a torpedo aimed at a US battleship under heavy attack. An American flag (faint) can be seen on the ship's mast.Dated Feb. 1942, this advertising postcard shows a Japanese torpedo bomber dropping a torpedo aimed at a US battleship under heavy attack. An American flag (faint) can be seen on the ship's mast. The advertising copy reads, "This one shot is a phenomenal force." On the left, the text reads, "A new weapon for national savings." "Very low insurance premiums." "Mitsui's provision for old age" "It has no enemies!" For some reason, the left corners of the card were cut with scissors, perhaps to remove it from an album.

Needless to say, the lowest point in US-Japan relations was World War II. The Pearl Harbor attack, the internment of Japanese-Americans, battles at Midway and other Pacific islands, Tokyo fire bombing raids, land battle on Okinawa, and the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki still reverberate among the generations today. Every year in August in Japan, ceremonies are held to mark and memorialize the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings and the war's end. All the while, Dec. 8 (7 in Hawaii) is just another day in Japan with no particular significance.

Of course in Hawaii, Dec. 7 is a day of national mourning as much as Hiroshima/Nagasaki Day in Japan. Each country mourns its own and neither seems to care about the other's war dead. I await the day when both countries mourn for each other as well as for themselves. After all, we all belong to the same family, the Family of Man.
3 comments09/19/08 at 04:01kingston@greennet.net: From: kingston@greennet.net (Jul 15, 2005 11:53)...
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Wartime Mitsui Life Insurance ad card. Dated Feb. 1942, this advertising postcard shows a Japanese torpedo bomber dropping a torpedo aimed at a US battleship under heavy attack. An American flag (faint) can be seen on the ship's mast.Dated Feb. 1942, this advertising postcard shows a Japanese torpedo bomber dropping a torpedo aimed at a US battleship under heavy attack. An American flag (faint) can be seen on the ship's mast. The advertising copy reads, "This one shot is a phenomenal force." On the left, the text reads, "A new weapon for national savings." "Very low insurance premiums." "Mitsui's provision for old age" "It has no enemies!" For some reason, the left corners of the card were cut with scissors, perhaps to remove it from an album.

Needless to say, the lowest point in US-Japan relations was World War II. The Pearl Harbor attack, the internment of Japanese-Americans, battles at Midway and other Pacific islands, Tokyo fire bombing raids, land battle on Okinawa, and the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki still reverberate among the generations today. Every year in August in Japan, ceremonies are held to mark and memorialize the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings and the war's end. All the while, Dec. 8 (7 in Hawaii) is just another day in Japan with no particular significance.

Of course in Hawaii, Dec. 7 is a day of national mourning as much as Hiroshima/Nagasaki Day in Japan. Each country mourns its own and neither seems to care about the other's war dead. I await the day when both countries mourn for each other as well as for themselves. After all, we all belong to the same family, the Family of Man.
3 comments09/19/08 at 04:00philbert: From: philbert@photojpn.org (May 13, 2004 14:19)...
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Wartime Mitsui Life Insurance ad card. Dated Feb. 1942, this advertising postcard shows a Japanese torpedo bomber dropping a torpedo aimed at a US battleship under heavy attack. An American flag (faint) can be seen on the ship's mast.Dated Feb. 1942, this advertising postcard shows a Japanese torpedo bomber dropping a torpedo aimed at a US battleship under heavy attack. An American flag (faint) can be seen on the ship's mast. The advertising copy reads, "This one shot is a phenomenal force." On the left, the text reads, "A new weapon for national savings." "Very low insurance premiums." "Mitsui's provision for old age" "It has no enemies!" For some reason, the left corners of the card were cut with scissors, perhaps to remove it from an album.

Needless to say, the lowest point in US-Japan relations was World War II. The Pearl Harbor attack, the internment of Japanese-Americans, battles at Midway and other Pacific islands, Tokyo fire bombing raids, land battle on Okinawa, and the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki still reverberate among the generations today. Every year in August in Japan, ceremonies are held to mark and memorialize the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings and the war's end. All the while, Dec. 8 (7 in Hawaii) is just another day in Japan with no particular significance.

Of course in Hawaii, Dec. 7 is a day of national mourning as much as Hiroshima/Nagasaki Day in Japan. Each country mourns its own and neither seems to care about the other's war dead. I await the day when both countries mourn for each other as well as for themselves. After all, we all belong to the same family, the Family of Man.
3 comments09/19/08 at 03:59webmaster@postcard.org: From: webmaster@postcard.org (Jun 19, 2003 20:37...
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Welcome Parade for the American Fleet. The fleet's crew enjoyed a few days in Japan and was given the red-carpet treatment. A welcoming parade was given in downtown Tokyo around Shimbashi (pictured above) and Hibiya Park.A large turnout is apparent in this photo showing a horse-drawn carriage carrying the US and Japanese flags.

American crewmen held Japanese paper umbrellas with a star design, while the Japanese and American flags were everywhere. Japan was highly in favor of peaceful relations with the U.S. The American sailors were surprised and delighted by the friendliness and hospitality of the Japanese.
1 comments09/19/08 at 03:58Comments: From: Winston Hu (Jan 19, 2004 01:20)
It is a g...
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Russo-Japan Peace Conference representatives. Left to right: Russian Finance Minister Count Sergei Witte, Baron Rosen, US President Theodore Roosevelt, Japanese Ambassador to the US Kogoro Takahira, and Japanese Foreign Minister Jutaro Komura.It was a time when nations jostled for territory and trade. The Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05 was waged mainly for the control of Manchuria and Korea. The US fully supported Japan and hoped that Japan would keep Korea open to all nations for commerce. The war started before it was declared with Japan launching a surprise attack to destroy part of the Russian fleet at Port Arthur in Manchuria and landing troops in Korea. The US and Great Britain cheered Japan. The US assumed that Japan would open up Asian markets. President Theodore Roosevelt believed that Japan was fighting Russia for America. But then, he also feared that if Japan won the war, there might be a struggle between the US and Japan in the future.

In the famous Battle of the Sea of Japan on May 27-28, 1905, Japan astonishingly defeated the Russian fleet which had sailed from the Baltic Sea eighteen months before. Even before this battle, Japan was financially drained and asked Roosevelt to mediate an end to the war. Although Japan was winning the war, they were outnumbered by the Russians who had the troops and resources to keep fighting. The Russian czar, however, finally relented after seeing his Baltic fleet destroyed.

A peace conference was held at Portsmouth, New Hampshire in July and Aug. 1905. The principle representatives are pictured in the postcard above. The caption on the bottom of the card identifies these men. The Japanese handwriting in-between is only correspondence and not part of the original postcard which has a postmark dated Aug. 30, 1905.

Harvard-educated Jutaro Komura was a star in Japan's Foreign Ministry and a successful diplomat in Washington DC and Peking. He was in favor of obtaining control in both Manchuria and Korea. Komura also was instrumental in having Japan form an alliance with Great Britain in 1902. This move further strengthened Japan's position vis-a-vis Russia. Anybody attacking Japan would also have to face the British who had the world's largest navy.

Count Sergei Witte created the Trans-Siberian railway and he was highly respected by the US.

For mediating peace between Japan and Russia, President Roosevelt went on to become the first American to win the Nobel Peace Prize in 1906.
1 comments09/19/08 at 03:57Bengt: From: bengt.fagerholm@akseli.fi (Apr 07, 2004 03...
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Drawing of Commodore Perry, Grossly distorted if not humorous rendition of Commodore Perry by a Japanese artist who apparently never knew what Perry really looked like. It was drawn at a time when the Japanese thought all foreigners were barbarians.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:56Comments: From: simpatico@sina.com (Nov 22, 2002 10:57)
t...
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Commodore Perry Landing Monument. The Perry monument at Kurihama on the Miura Peninsula (Kanagawa Pref.) was built on July 14, 1901. It marks the spot where he first landed in Japan in 1853.Click to see what the monument looks like today. I wonder what happened to it during the World War II. Was it destroyed or left untouched? This postcard was made to commemorate the visit of the US Fleet in Oct. 1908.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:54Comments: From: Phil Conroy (Jun 16, 2003 03:49)
Yes, it ...
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Flower arrangement. She's about to put the flower into the vase made of bamboo. On her lap, there's a pair of scissors used for flower arrangement. Her purple kimono has a design showing wisteria flowers. The season must have been spring.The card was printed in color so it's not that old.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:53Comments: From: barbedwiregenki@yahoo.com (Sep 02, 2004 17...
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Tres Flores. Intriguing pose. It looks like a modern postcard, but it's postmarked 1907!1 comments09/19/08 at 03:51murao_suki@yahoo.fr: From: murao_suki@yahoo.fr (Oct 20, 2003 07:26)
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Rear and side views. Nice side and back shot of a kimono woman. Can't see any wedding ring, but she looks married.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:50kayako: From: kayako (Jun 29, 2006 15:29)
she looks lik...
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Teruha sitting.Her name was Teruha and she appeared in many postcards. She's probably still in her teens in this photo. She was born in 1896 in Osaka and worked as a geisha in Shimbashi, Tokyo before becoming a Buddhist priest in Kyoto. Read more about her interesting life by James A. Gatlin at geikogallery.com.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:49Cheryl: From: Cheryl (Mar 05, 2007 23:00)
Thank you for...
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Teruha with chrysanthemum. The flower she's holding matches her kimono design that shows the same flower. Her name was Teruha and she appeared in many postcards. She was born in 1896 in Osaka and worked as a geisha in Shimbashi, Tokyo. Click to read mTeruha with chrysanthemum. The flower she's holding matches her kimono design that shows the same flower. Her name was Teruha and she appeared in many postcards. She was born in 1896 in Osaka and worked as a geisha in Shimbashi, Tokyo before becoming a Buddhist priest in Kyoto. Read more about her interesting life by James A. Gatlin at geikogallery.com.2 comments09/19/08 at 03:46philbert: From: Philbert Ono (May 26, 2003 17:29)
It is w...
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Teruha with chrysanthemum. The flower she's holding matches her kimono design that shows the same flower. Her name was Teruha and she appeared in many postcards. She was born in 1896 in Osaka and worked as a geisha in Shimbashi, Tokyo. Click to read mTeruha with chrysanthemum. The flower she's holding matches her kimono design that shows the same flower. Her name was Teruha and she appeared in many postcards. She was born in 1896 in Osaka and worked as a geisha in Shimbashi, Tokyo before becoming a Buddhist priest in Kyoto. Read more about her interesting life by James A. Gatlin at geikogallery.com.2 comments09/19/08 at 03:45James A. Gatlin: From: James A. Gatlin (Sep 16, 2002 12:25)
Than...
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Woman and cherry blossoms. Unfortunately, she's too hunchbacked in this picture.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:43yen84iir@yahoo.com: From: yen84iir@yahoo.com (Jan 13, 2004 23:17)
I...
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Woman with two flowers. She's holding the flowers in a cross or "X" mark. I wouldn't call that a good way to hold flowers (unless you're a hula dancer).1 comments09/19/08 at 03:40Comments: From: llwestphal@yahoo.com (Jan 05, 2003 14:17)
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Laughing Geisha with umbrella. As you may have noticed, the umbrella (and fan) was a commonly used prop in tourist photos. Postmarked 1903 from Yokohama. The actual card is more yellowed and almost brown, but I bleached it with Photoshop.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:28m.beaton: From: m.beaton (Jan 05, 2003 06:01)
What an exc...
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Laughing Geisha with umbrella. The sender probably wrote about his incredible adventures in Japan. Postmarked 1904 from Yokohama addressed to Hamburg, Germany. The actual card is more yellowed and almost brown, but I bleached it with Photoshop.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:27Tatsu: From: Tatsu (Mar 05, 2004 18:15)
You have a ver...
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Laughing Geisha with fan. There are two Yokohama postmarks on this card. One in Japanese (over the stamp) and one in English. The actual card is more yellowed and almost brown, but I bleached it with Photoshop.There are two Yokohama postmarks on this card. One in Japanese (over the stamp) and one in English. Japanese postmarks have the date in the Year-month-day format. And English postmarks have it in the Day-month-Western year format. As you may know, Japan bases its years on the Emperor's reign. In the Japanese postmark, you can see "36" for the year. That's not 1936, but Meiji 36 that corresponds to 1903. Besides the Meiji Period (1868-1912), there's the Taisho Period (1912-1926) and the Showa Period (1926-1989). Since the Japanese postmark only indicates the last two digits of the year, it can be a pain to figure out which period the year belongs to. In most cases, we can figure it out with the stamp or type of postcard back.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:26philbert: From: nnogi@yahoo.com (Oct 30, 2002 21:30)
The ...
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Laughing Geisha with low neck. She's almost semi-nude. It is probably her sexiest pose of all. A great summertime card and one of my favorites. Hand-colored and postmarked Feb. 25, 1908 in Yokohama. The actual card is more yellowed.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:24Comments: From: neeta@tiscali.it (Jul 26, 2003 11:11)
nic...
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Maiko on Gojobashi Bridge. Postcard-size real photo taken in Kyoto. She has been poorly posed. Her posture is bad, her kimono is ruffled, the sleeves look bad, and her feet are pointing in the wrong direction. Maiko usually know how to pose themselves.Postcard-size real photo taken in Kyoto. She has been poorly posed. Her posture is bad, her kimono is ruffled, the sleeves look bad, and her feet are pointing in the wrong direction. Maiko usually know how to pose themselves for a photograph. But not this one. Perhaps she's an amateur.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:22Tatsu: From: Tatsu (Mar 05, 2004 18:02)
There are many...
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Maiko with umbrella. The quickest way to tell if she is a geisha or maiko is by looking at her back. The tell-tale sign of a maiko is her long obi sash hanging down behind. Whereas the geisha's sash has a short knot instead.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:21philbert: From: CW (Oct 10, 2004 23:31)
Plus the inside i...
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Smiling Maiko Standing. Great smile. This is the same woman in the card where two maiko are holding the Japanese flag.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:20philbert: From: Kiki (Apr 07, 2006 06:41)
This girl is ve...
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Smiling Maiko Sitting. Real-photo postcard to cheer up soldiers. This card was sent as military mail from Kyoto on New Year's Day 1939. The kanji characters on the fan says "Banzai," the traditional Japanese cheer for victory and happy occasReal-photo postcard to cheer up soldiers. This card was sent as military mail from Kyoto on New Year's Day 1939. The kanji characters on the fan says "Banzai," the traditional Japanese cheer for victory and happy occasions. It also means "long life," something that soldiers would like.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:18philbert: From: alex@jasminalex.karoo.co.uk (Sep 19, 2003 ...
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Swimsuit pin-up. Another picture that makes you laugh. Apparently she felt sexy in that suit and knew how to pose like a pin-up swimsuit model.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:16philbert: From: gregory.clark@rogers.com (Jan 05, 2003 23:...
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In front of mirror. Hand-colored postcard sent as a Christmas card in 1914.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:15philbert: From: llwestphal@yahoo.com (Jan 05, 2003 13:31)
...
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Woman on bicycle. That's a thick shawl she's wearing. Must've been winter. It's unusual to see a bicycle used as a studio prop. Riding a bicycle while wearing a kimono must have been difficult. The postmark looks like 1908. Hand-colored.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:13philbert: From: Axia (Nov 12, 2002 17:04)
I'm pretty ...
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Woman with pen and scroll. Judging from her hairstyle, this photo was probably taken during the Taisho Period (1912-1926).1 comments09/19/08 at 03:12philbert: From: Rob Oechsle (Dec 16, 2006 21:20)
The gal&...
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Smiling for the camera. It's always nice to see a smiling woman on a vintage postard. This is not an ideal smile though. Kind of sheepish and unnatural. Sort of half-hearted and "halfway" like her fan which is only half open.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:11philbert: From: romy (Aug 25, 2004 10:59)
it is rare for ...
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Japanese Beauty. I would call this a representative example of a "Nihon Bijin" or Japanese Beauty photograph. She's posed formally, dressed in a kimono, and looking serene and attractive. She might bJe a geisha. Hand-colored, and undivided bI bought it for 1,200 yen.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:10philbert: From: anonymous (Aug 12, 2003 10:57)
Geisha wea...
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Beauty with fan. The white space around her was for writing the correspondence. You could not write the message on the same side as the address. The back of the postcard was for the address only.So it has an undivided back, which means there is no dividing line between the address side and correspondence side, Postcards with an undivided back were made between 1900 and March 28, 1907. That's how we know the approximate age of this card even though it has no postmark.1 comments09/19/08 at 03:09philbert: From: faenocturne@gmail.com (Jul 13, 2005 23:34)...
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Girl with Umbrella. Hand-colored postcard dating before 1918. The kimono looks like casual wear, and the design pattern was typical during the turn of the 20th century. She's still in her teens it seems. One of the first vintage postcards I bought. Y21 comments09/19/08 at 03:07philbert: From: demendes@ureach.com (Jun 08, 2003 15:33)
...
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Geisha and maikoNot a good photo, but their names are written in hiragana on the back. They read "Suimatsu" on the left and "Shigezuru" on the right who is a maiko, not geisha. She has more ornaments in her hair than the geisha. Also notice their blackened teeth. If they are in Kyoto, a geisha is called "geiko." In Tokyo, a maiko (apprentice geisha) is called "hangyoku." This is a postcard-size photo and not a postcard.1 comments09/19/08 at 02:39philbert: From: bridgethiggins@hotmail.com (Jul 23, 2004 1...
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Pair of Geisha, autographed. One of my most treasured cards. This card was signed (on the chest area) by these two geisha with a fountain pen. Several other geisha also signed the back of the card. (See the next image.)1 comments09/19/08 at 02:37philbert: From: haramoler@excite.com (Jan 16, 2005 23:13)
...
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Maiko in Her RoomA private moment. This maiko is lying down in her kimono reading a comic book after getting tired of playing cards. Her mama-san probably would not be pleased to see her wrinkle the kimono like that. Not sure if this was staged or a candid shot. It's hard for anyone to lie down like that in a kimono.1 comments09/19/08 at 02:31philbert: From: naomi@immortalgeisha.com (Nov 12, 2003 21:...
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Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 02:22Comments: From: emiko (Jul 27, 2006 19:57)
facts

-oira...
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Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 02:21Comments: From: jojoscandles@hotmail.com (Jan 31, 2006 12:...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 02:14Comments: From: Jeff (Jan 24, 2006 19:37)
I think things ...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 02:09Comments: From: tell'em_like_i_see'em (Nov 23, 200...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 02:08philbert: From: philbert (Nov 08, 2005 ) More oiran (...)
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 02:05Comments: From: faenocturne@gmail.com (Jul 13, 2005 23:16)...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 02:02Comments: From: greatjob! (Apr 23, 2004 03:00)
I have lea...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 02:01philbert: From: philbert (Apr 01, 2004 03:09)
Thanks for al...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 02:00Kiki: From: Kiki (Mar 12, 2004 01:12)
*ahem* I am not...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:59what's the deal?: From: what's the deal? (Feb 11, 2004 12:15)
...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:58Claire: From: Claire (Nov 26, 2003 14:07)
i am appalled...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:57naomi@immortalgeisha.com: From: naomi@immortalgeisha.com (Nov 12, 2003 21:...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:57anonymous: From: anonymous (Nov 09, 2003 15:36) i think tha...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:56Karen: From: Karen (Nov 05, 2003 21:05)Liza Dalby, the ...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:55Emerald: From: Emerald (Oct 11, 2003 23:53)As Maya's ...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:53maya: From: maya maifa_angel@hotmail.com (Oct 11, 2003...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:52kikuko: From: kikuko (Oct 07, 2003 17:50)
geisha are no...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:51RJ: From: RJ (Aug 02, 2003 09:08) Can anyone tell me...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:50Darci: From: Darci (Jun 02, 2003 05:24) ok...she is not...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:49Suie: From: Suie (May 29, 2003 04:23)
I can't bel...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:47Mayuri: From: Mayuri (Apr 14, 2003 17:49)
GAH! I cannot...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:45Lilly: From: Lilly (Apr 03, 2003 20:32)
Geisha were no...
gm014-MAI10.jpg
Oiran courtesan. Also see my photos of an oiran show here. My oiran video at YouTube here.The highest-ranking geisha is called an oiran or tayu. She is escorted by two little attendant girls called kamuro. Notice her high clogs. It takes some skill to walk in those and she usually requires someone's shoulder to hold onto while walking. Sometimes at festivals or special events, you can see the Oiran Dochu procession where she walks in a parade together with geisha attendants. 23 comments09/19/08 at 01:42suzume: From: suzume (Mar 10, 2003 11:06)
Only the pros...
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Memorial to the dogs who served in Antartica.1 comments04/24/06 at 12:46Guest_Anon: When I travelled to Tokyo last April for cherryblo...
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Body inspection up ahead. They frisked the body and also used a metal detector as well. I had to explain that the hump in my pants pocket was a wallet and cell phone. He believed me since I have an honest-looking face.1 comments04/12/06 at 02:22Guest_Anon: Very smart. We don't have to have a body insp...
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引けや引け引け2 comments04/09/06 at 01:17philbert: You have to go to a special hairdressing school in...
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In the news: Article in Asahi Shimbun, Dec. 11, 2005 Sunday morning edition. The headline reads, "Let's Make an English Version of the Rowing Song."A reporter for the Asahi Shimbun in Otsu thought my project was worthy enough for a story in the Dec. 11, 2005 Sunday morning edition of the newspaper's Shiga News page (distributed in Shiga Prefecture).

The headline reads, "Let's Make an English Version of the Boat Song." It describes my project to create an English version of the song and have it sung at the annual choir contest in June in Imazu (which didn't happen in 2006). It also quotes people in Imazu who welcome my project for an English version.

2005年12月11日の朝日新聞朝刊の滋賀版に僕の写真展と歌の英語化を大きく掲載されました。あんなちっぽけな写真展で注目されるなんて想像もつきませんでした。

英語版を2006年6月3日に発表したあとも各新聞紙の滋賀版で大きく報道されました。詳細はここ。
1 comments04/03/06 at 06:14Guest_mayumi: do you have the english version you made? your ph...
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Although not part of the Koto Sanzan Temple Trio (all Tendai Buddhist temples), most visitors also visit Eigenji together with the Koto Sanzan temples. Accessible by bus taking 30-40 min. from Yokaichi Station on the Omi Railway Line or from Hyakusaiji. 4 comments03/25/06 at 01:45philbert: Not a jizo
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Although not part of the Koto Sanzan Temple Trio (all Tendai Buddhist temples), most visitors also visit Eigenji together with the Koto Sanzan temples. Accessible by bus taking 30-40 min. from Yokaichi Station on the Omi Railway Line or from Hyakusaiji. 4 comments03/25/06 at 00:00Guest_Anon: Is it a jizo san?
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1 comments02/26/06 at 03:52Guest_Anon: what date is the narita tiako festival in 2006
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Although not part of the Koto Sanzan Temple Trio (all Tendai Buddhist temples), most visitors also visit Eigenji together with the Koto Sanzan temples. Accessible by bus taking 30-40 min. from Yokaichi Station on the Omi Railway Line or from Hyakusaiji. 4 comments02/15/06 at 03:13philbert: Yes. Most people thought it looked cute.
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Although not part of the Koto Sanzan Temple Trio (all Tendai Buddhist temples), most visitors also visit Eigenji together with the Koto Sanzan temples. Accessible by bus taking 30-40 min. from Yokaichi Station on the Omi Railway Line or from Hyakusaiji. 4 comments02/14/06 at 22:28Guest_Anon: Are those glasses the statue is wearing?
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Asashoryu joins in1 comments02/11/06 at 20:02Guest_Brotolemu: Asashoryu!!! I want to fight you (brotolemu@yahoo....
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She walks in a very slow and stylized way, her feet taking figure-8 steps. She needs the man's shoulder to steady herself.1 comments01/29/06 at 09:53Guest_Anon: I love to see this fetival on vhs or Dvd
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Outdoor toilet 野外のトイレ1 comments01/05/06 at 04:57Guest_Anonyymi: Ulkohuussi
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引けや引け引け2 comments12/05/05 at 06:56Anon: can ANYONE ssend me pics on HOW to style long hair...
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Kawasaki ZZR 1400 ABS motorcycleI looked at her and she smiled.1 comments11/28/05 at 18:20Anon: does she come with the bike?
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White Heron Dance in front of Kaminarimon Gate.1 comments11/24/05 at 02:39Shelbe: That is awsome!
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According to legend, three days after the golden Kannon statue was found, a golden dragon descended from heaven and danced. The mountain name of the temple is Kinryu-zan, meaning Golden Dragon Mountain. (Most temples have a mountain name.)According to legend, three days after the golden Kannon statue was found, a golden dragon descended from heaven and danced. The mountain name of the temple is Kinryu-zan, meaning Golden Dragon Mountain. (Most temples have a mountain name.)1 comments11/24/05 at 02:35Shelbe: Kool! I like the dragon
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1 comments11/04/05 at 06:16Kikkawa: The Home of the Kikkawa Clan in 1601
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Old tree bark1 comments10/31/05 at 10:13A Finn: Birch trees.
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MushroomProbably not edible.1 comments10/31/05 at 10:13A Finn: Looks edible - perhaps a 'kangasrousku'.
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Fallen treeYou see fallen trees everywhere in the forest. Instead of being cleared away, they are left on the ground where they rot and host new life such as moss and lichens.

Finland has a lot of dead or half-dead trees too with wilted branches and no leaves. This is something we don't see so much in Japan. Most trees are cut down and hauled away for lumber before they die.

倒れた木が多い。そのまま放置されて後ほど新しい生き物が。
1 comments10/31/05 at 10:08A Finn: Some of the Finnish old-growth forests are protect...
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Not a well1 comments10/31/05 at 10:03A Finn: This is a typical water well and a hoist with a co...
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Costume gals. Even these girls walked on the fire.

1 comments10/04/05 at 12:17Anon: they are so cool
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Hypocenter of atomic bombA series of concentric circles emanate from the marker.1 comments09/20/05 at 01:57US WWII Veteran: Should be titled Retribution
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1 comments04/30/05 at 09:45Ashley Hicks: The older monkeys are not as active as the younger...
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1 comments04/30/05 at 09:42Ashley Hicks: There is a Ryokan on the trail to the monkey park....
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1 comments04/30/05 at 09:39Ashley Hicks: The monkeys soak, and drink from the same hot spri...
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1 comments04/30/05 at 09:37Ashley Hicks: The monkeys are always picking through the snow fo...
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1 comments04/30/05 at 09:35Ashley Hicks: The monkey park is surrounded by many snow capped ...
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Wet monkey1 comments04/30/05 at 09:32Ashley Hicks: The baby snow monkeys were born about a month befo...
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1 comments04/30/05 at 09:30Ashley Hicks: The monkeys have an incredible ability to gaze int...
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1 comments04/30/05 at 09:26Ashley Hicks: The monkeys remind me of little people. They are s...
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1 comments04/30/05 at 09:22Ashley Hicks: The monkeys love to dip in and out of the hotsprin...
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1 comments04/21/05 at 08:19Mark Hemmings: A young monkey, which are usually born in early sp...
sa17saru.jpg
1 comments04/21/05 at 08:18Mark Hemmings: A very intimate portrait of a mother and child
sa06saru.jpg
1 comments04/21/05 at 08:16Mark Hemmings: This photo has been published a number of times, a...
sa05saru.jpg
1 comments04/21/05 at 08:15Mark Hemmings: On the very cold days the monkeys drift off to sle...
sa04saru.jpg
1 comments04/21/05 at 08:14Mark Hemmings: Fuji Neopan 1600 or Kodak TMAX 3200 work well at J...
sa03saru.jpg
Ahhh...1 comments04/21/05 at 08:12Mark Hemmings: February in Shiga Kogen is frigid . . . this day w...
     
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