ks100-20090919_0023.jpg
The Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri and Haruki Danjiri Matsuri festivals are held during the weekend before Respect for Aged Day (national holiday) which is the third Mon. in Sept. The Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri is held near Nankai Kishiwada Station (pictured).
ks101-20090919_0020.jpg
Hundreds of people pull and run with wooden danjiri floats around the central streets. This is the entrance of Kishiwada Ekimae-dori shopping arcade in front of the train station. These photos were taken on Sept. 19-20, 2009.
ks102-20090919_0079.jpg
On Sat., the first day of the festival, they pulled the danjiri floats from 6:00 am to 7:30 am in their respective neighborhoods. Then from 9:30 am to 11 am, they pull the floats along the central streets, including Kishiwada Ekimae-dori shopping arcade.
ks103-20090919_0086.jpg
After coming out of the Kishiwada Ekimae-dori shopping arcade, they face Nankai Kishiwada Station's west side. The procession route is mainly on the west side (ocean side) of the train tracks.
ks104-20090919_0101.jpg
They stop for a while, then run and turn left or right. The procession route is quite long, and you can follow it on the map they give out. Most spectators gather at several key points along the route.
ks105-20090919_0105.jpg
This T-intersection in front of Nankai Kishiwada Station is one good place to watch the floats go by. However, I recommend walking along the route to see other key places, especially at intersections where they turn.
ks106-20090919_0126.jpg
Sand bags protect the street corners from any collisions by the floats.
ks107-20090919_0154.jpg
Each float has two long white ropes pulled by many people, both men and women, dressed in happi coats, headband, and usually white pants.
ks108-20090919_0160.jpg
They run while pulling the danjiri floats while a man on the float's roof dances and prances with two fans. They pass by very quickly, unlike other float festivals. This is in front of Kishiwada Station.
ks109-20090919_0169.jpg
Rear view.
ks110-20090919_0248.jpg
There are 31 Kishiwada danjiri floats. Made of wood, they weigh about 4 tons. They consist of 300 parts, the most of any festival floats in Japan.
ks111-20090919_0253.jpg
Look closely and you'll see numerous intricate wood carvings. Much of them are protected by a steel netting. The oldest danjiri still in use today was built in 1840.
ks112-20090919_0255.jpg
The original danjiri floats were made in the 17th century by skilled craftsmen and carpenters in Kishiwada specializing in building shrines and temples.
ks113-20090919_0265.jpg
Some carvings depict famous battle or historical scenes.
ks114-20090919_0254.jpg
ks115-20090919_0367.jpg
On Sat., after a lunch break, the danjiri again ran along the central streets from 1 pm to 5 pm. In front of the Kishiwada Ekimae-dori shopping arcade, they stopped and threw hand towels, etc., to the crowd.
ks116-20090919_0293.jpg
They also pop party poppers.
ks117-20090919_0316.jpg
Streamers from part poppers blown by the wind get caught in the power lines. The best spot to take pictures here is occupied by a police/press grandstand seen on the right with the red and white curtain.
ks118-20090919_0342.jpg
Most pf the danjiri festival girls had braided scalps, sometimes in a flowery pattern..
ks119-20090919_0346.jpg
Girls standing by to pull a danjiri float.
ks120-20090919_0350.jpg
ks121-20090919_0357.jpg
ks122-20090919_0359.jpg
It's quite a spectacle to see all these people running while pulling a rope. Amazing that no one tripped and fell down.
ks123-20090919_0363.jpg
Here they come in front of Kishiwada Station.
ks124-20090919_0369.jpg
One float released balloons.
ks125-20090919_0384.jpg
ks126-20090919_0400.jpg
Each danjiri has a man (sometimes two of them) dancing up and down on the roof while the danjiri moves. This is another dramatic aspect of the festival.
ks127-20090919_0409.jpg
It must take a lot of skill and practice to balance yourself on a moving danjiri and dance on a sloping roof.
ks128-20090919_0412.jpg
Men behind the danjiri pull shorter ropes attached to a steering pole. They steer the float by pulling the ropes when necessary.
ks129-20090919_0436.jpg
One danjiri group wore these pointy caps. Maybe it was somebody's birthday??
ks130-20090919_0442.jpg
Also see my video at YouTube.
ks131-20090919_0445.jpg
ks132-20090919_0446.jpg
ks133-20090919_0448.jpg
ks134-20090919_0450.jpg
ks135-20090919_0456.jpg
Riding on the danjiri float at the front are three of the danjiri group's important officers. Musicians (flute players, drummers, and bell ringers) also ride and perform on the danjiri.
ks135b-kishiwada.youtube
My video of Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri Festival, around Nankai Kishiwada Station in Kishiwada, Osaka. Footage shot mainly near Kishiwada Castle.
ks136-20090919_0552.jpg
This is another part of the parade route. They are approaching an intersection called Can-Can-ba.
ks137-20090919_0569.jpg
Can-Can is the most popular spot to see the danjiri festival in Kishiwada. It is a T-intersection where the floats turn into the Ekimae-dori at high speed from two directions.
ks138-20090919_0564.jpg
Can-Can has spectator stands which charge admission, like 2,000 yen or 3,000 yen for 2 hours.
ks139-20090919_0575.jpg
Spectator stand (admission charged) at Can-Can intersection.
ks140-20090919_0592.jpg
Can-Can intersection. Danjiri from both the left and right will enter the road in the middle. カンカン場
ks141-20090919_0583.jpg
Danjiri at Can-Can.
ks142-20090919_0609.jpg
ks143-20090919_0599.jpg
Danjiri entering Ekimae-dori at Can-Can.
ks143g-20150920_1372.jpg
ks143h-20150920_1375.jpg
ks144-20090919_0624.jpg
Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri
ks145-20090919_0614.jpg
A float stands by to enter Can-Can intersection.
ks146-20090919_0620.jpg
ks147-20090919_0636.jpg
Can-Can from another angle. This goes on until 5 pm on Sat.
ks148-20090919_0649.jpg
From 5 pm to 7 pm, there is a break during which the danjiri floats mount paper lanterns for the night parade.
ks149-20090919_0650.jpg
ks150-20090919_0654.jpg
Paper lanterns to be mounted on a danjiri float.
ks151-20090919_0658.jpg
The paper lanterns are lit with small electric lightbulbs powered by many car batteries. The batteries are put on the floats. They don't use power generators.
ks152-20090919_0664.jpg
Mounting paper lanterns on a danjiri float.
ks153-20090919_0691.jpg
Inside the shopping arcade, another danjiri is being mounted with paper lanterns.
ks154-20090919_0677.jpg
This float is ready for the night parade which is held from 7 pm to 10 pm.
ks155-20090919_0653.jpg
Confection in the shape of danjiri.
ks156-20090919_0731.jpg
From 7 pm, they start parading the danjiri floats festooned with lit paper lanterns. This is the entrance to the shopping arcade in front of Kishiwada Station.
ks157-20090919_0727.jpg
Unlike the daytime parade, at night they pull the danjiri slowly. No running. Slow enough for little children to pull the float's ropes.
ks158-20090919_0728.jpg
ks158g-20150920_1390.jpg
ks159-20090919_0741.jpg
This float has the lanterns lit to form the kanji character for "kita" (北) in reference to the float's neighborhood (Kita-machi).
ks160-20090919_0746.jpg
ks161-20090919_0752.jpg
ks162-20090919_0694.jpg
Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri lanterns in front of Kishiwada Station.
ks163-20090919_0735.jpg
Kishiwada Station, west side. I stopped over in Kishiwada on Sat. night so I could see the festival the next day as well.
ks164-20090920_0789.jpg
On Sunday morning (Sept. 20, 2009), as I was walking toward Kishiwada Station, I saw this danjiri coming up and making a turn.
ks165-20090920_0790.jpg
It turned into this road, but not before it brushed against the roof of the building on the left. There was a big crumpling noise. You can see the dust near the roof.
ks166-20090920_0795.jpg
The roof was significantly damaged, and they just brushed aside the broken roof tiles.
ks167-20090920_0793.jpg
Roof damaged by danjiri float. I hope the owner had danjiri damage insurance. I heard that such accidents are unusual, but it happened right in front of me. Didn't get it on video though.
ks168-20090920_0828.jpg
On Sun. morning, the the danjiri parade is called "Miya-iri" which means that they are going to the shrine to be blessed. This is in front of Kishiwada City Hall on a slope called Konakara-zaka (こなから坂).
ks169-20090920_0808.jpg
This spot in front of city hall is very popular to view the floats passing by.
ks170-20090920_0847.jpg
I had a good viewing spot until these festival men kept standing in front of us. After passing by Kishiwada City Hall, the danjiri headed to Kishiwada Castle and then to the shrine.
ks171-20090920_1162.jpg
So I left city hall and walked to Kishiwada Castle. It's difficult to figure out which roads to walk on. Some parts of the danjiri route are closed to pedestrians, especially where there are no sidewalks. Danjiri need a wide road.
ks172-20090920_1164.jpg
Leaving city hall was a blessing in disguise as I was able to get great shots of the floats with Kishiwada Castle in the background.
ks173-20090920_1175.jpg
Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri and Kishiwada Castle
ks174-20090920_1179.jpg
ks175-20090920_1183.jpg
We were blessed with a sunny day, and castles and festival floats always look best with a blue sky.
ks176-20090920_1025.jpg
ks177-20090920_1037.jpg
There is a road around Kishiwada Castle, but most of it is closed to pedestrians. The police will tell you how to get to the castle if you want to go inside.
ks178-20090920_1040.jpg
This float had two boys on the roof.
ks179-20090920_1046.jpg
Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri and Kishiwada Castle
ks180-20090920_1059.jpg
ks181-20090920_1063.jpg
Looks like his dad is teaching him to become a roof dancer as well. Dad holds the boy at all times.
ks182-20090920_1058.jpg
You may wonder if those men on the danjiri roof ever slip and fall. Well, they wear rubber-soled footwear and the roof is covered with grippy matting.
ks183-20090920_1053.jpg
Musicians on a danjiri float. There's a large taiko drum inside the float.
ks184-20090920_1082.jpg
Also see my video at YouTube.
ks185-20090920_1094.jpg
ks186-20090920_1106.jpg
Kishiwada Castle and danjiri float pullers
ks187-20090920_1116.jpg
ks188-20090920_0887.jpg
Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri and Kishiwada Castle
ks189-20090920_0904.jpg
They are waiting their turn to reach the shrine.
ks190-20090920_0905.jpg
Kishiwada Castle and danjiri float.
ks191-20090920_0934.jpg
Kishiwada Castle and danjiri float.
ks192-20090920_0903.jpg
They are waiting their turn to reach the shrine.
ks193-20090920_0944.jpg
Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri and Kishiwada Castle
ks194-20090920_0957.jpg
ks195-20090920_0970.jpg
ks195g-20150920_1329.jpg
ks195h-20150920_1334.jpg
ks195i-20150920_1341.jpg
ks195j-20150920_1346.jpg
ks195k-20150920_1344.jpg
ks196-20090920_0864.jpg
Danjiri float being blessed in front of Kishiki Shrine, near Kishiwada Castle. 岸城神社
ks196g-20150920_1316.jpg
ks196h-20150920_1318.jpg
ks196i-20150920_1345.jpg
ks197-20090920_0869.jpg
A shrine priest blesses the danjiri float.
ks197g-20150920_1323.jpg
The float pullers enter the shrine grounds for a short prayer.
ks197h-20150920_1320.jpg
Kishiki Shrine's priest conducts a prayer for each float.
ks197i-20150920_1327.jpg
ks198-20090920_1191.jpg
Kishiwada Castle remained open during the festival.
ks199-20090920_1193.jpg
From Kishiwada Castle's lookout deck, you can see danjiri floats lining up all around to reach Kishiki Shrine.
ks200-20090920_1195.jpg
ks201-20090920_1197.jpg
ks202-20090920_1199.jpg
Danjiri float around Kishiwada Castle.
ks203-20090920_1198.jpg
ks203a-IMG_5384.jpg
Near Kishiwada Castle is the Danjiri Festival Museum. Very impressive museum dedicated to this famous festival.
ks203b-IMG_5388.jpg
Posters of past Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri and a large mural.
ks203c-20090920_1228.jpg
Large carpet-like mural depicting Kishiwada Castle and danjiri float.
ks203d-IMG_5387.jpg
Inside the museum are life-size models of danjiri roofs on which you can dance on.
ks204-20090920_1255.jpg
In the early afternoon on Sun., I decided to also see the Haruki Danjiri Matsuri near Nankai Haruki Station a short train ride away. This is near Haruki Station.
ks205-20090920_1261.jpg
The danjiri floats turned here in front of Haruki Station. I heard that they were more radical in Haruki, but that wasn't the case.
ks206-20090920_1270.jpg
Also see my Haruki video at YouTube.
ks207-20090920_1284.jpg
ks208-20090920_1290.jpg
ks209-20090920_1298.jpg
ks210-20090920_1318.jpg
ks211-20090920_1323.jpg
ks212-20090920_1346.jpg
After Haruki Station, I walked over to this road in front of a large shopping mall. This was another good spot to see the danjiri pass by.
ks213-20090920_1358.jpg
ks214-20090920_1370.jpg
ks215-20090920_1382.jpg
ks216-20090920_1388.jpg
ks217-20090920_1410.jpg
ks218-20090920_1417.jpg
ks219-20090920_1419.jpg
ks220-20090920_1427.jpg
ks221-20090920_1433.jpg
ks222-20090920_1439.jpg
ks223-20090920_1446.jpg
ks224-20090920_1475.jpg
I then went to a more remote intersection here, called Takamatsu.
ks225-20090920_1484.jpg
ks226-20090920_1497.jpg
ks227-20090920_1499.jpg
ks228-20090920_1506.jpg
ks229-20090920_1508.jpg
ks229b-kishiwada.youtube
My video of Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri Festival shot in the Haruki area near Haruki Station on Sept. 20, 2009 in Kishiwada, Osaka.
ks230-20090920_1511.jpg
I walked back toward town and saw Yaei Shrine. This is the shrine where the Haruki danjiri floats are blessed during the Miya-iri held on Sun. morning. 弥栄神社
ks231-20090920_1513.jpg
Yaei Shrine
ks232-20090920_1562.jpg
Then I walked to a T-intersection called Usagiya.
ks233-20090920_1570.jpg
ks234-20090920_1572.jpg
ks235-20090920_1573.jpg
ks236-20090920_1578.jpg
ks237-20090920_1582.jpg
ks238-20090920_1583.jpg
ks239-20090920_1584.jpg
ks240-20090920_1589.jpg
Head-on shot of them running in front of the shopping mall.
ks241-20090920_1601.jpg
ks242-20090920_1608.jpg
Haruki Danjiri Matsuri in front of the shopping mall.
ks243-20090920_1629.jpg
In Haruki, this section in front of the shopping mall was the most crowded.
ks244-20090920_1648.jpg
I noticed that the shopping mall had a roof and parking structure where we could see the danjiri passing by below.
ks245-20090920_1654.jpg
ks246-20090920_1655.jpg
ks247-20090920_1659.jpg
Bird's eye view of danjiri festival in Haruki. The shopping mall parking structure turned out to be a good place to shoot.
ks248-20090920_1661.jpg
ks249-20090920_1668.jpg
ks250-20090920_1667.jpg
ks251-20090920_1670.jpg
ks252-20090920_1674.jpg
ks253-20090920_1676.jpg
ks254-20090920_1685.jpg
ks255-20090920_1688.jpg
ks256-20090920_1709.jpg
ks257-20090920_1712.jpg
ks258-20090920_1714.jpg
ks259-20090920_1727.jpg
ks260-20090920_1728.jpg
Also see my Haruki video at YouTube.
ks261-20090920_1742.jpg
Here are two men dancing on the danjiri roof.
ks262-20090920_1753.jpg
ks263-20090920_1762.jpg
The parade ended at 5 pm. They then mounted paper lanterns on the floats for the night parade. Same as the night before. But I left Kishiwada before 7 pm when the night parade started.
ks264-20090920_1514.jpg
Haruki Danjiri Matsuri poster
ks265-20090920_1766.jpg
Haruki Station
   
186 files on 1 page(s)