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Main entrance to Aoyama Cemetery during cherry blossom season in early April. Gaienmae Station (Ginza/Hanzomon Line) and Nogizaka Station (Chiyoda Line) are the closest subway stations.
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Aoyama Cemetery office near the main entrance where you can obtain a map of the cemetery and ask where particular people are buried. The maps they provide do not show where the most famous people are (such as prime ministers).
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Main thoroughfare, lined with cherry trees, cuts through the middle of the cemetery where cars whiz by. Quite irritating.
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Cherry blossom tunnel at Aoyama Cemetery.
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Aoyama Cemetery is one of Tokyo's noted spots for cherry blossoms. However, having hanami picnics is not allowed.
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Cherry blossoms are so fleeting. They last for only a short time, like life itself. And so cherry blossoms are often found at cemetaries in Japan.
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These trees stood out.
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Cherry blossoms and graves.
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Aoyama Cemetery map. Quite complicated system to find grave plots.
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Signs tell you where you are. Quite bewildering mapping system.
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Aoyama Cemetery has over 123,000 graves occupying 125,000 square meters within the cemetery land area of 263,564 sq. meters.
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This is the Foreigner's Cemetery where many foreigners who helped to modernize Japan are buried.
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A monument erected in March 2007 by Tokyo Governor Ishihara Shintaro in appreciation of the foreigners who helped build Japan.
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List of foreigners buried in this Foreigner's Cemetery. Note that there also other foreigners buried in other parts of Aoyama Cemetery.
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Foreigner's Cemetery 外国人墓地
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Foreigner's Cemetery 外国人墓地
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Grave of Edoardo Chiossone (1833-1898), an Italian who introduced printing technology (for money and stamps) to Japan. He loved Japan and amassed a huge collection of Japanese art, especially woodblock prints. The collection is donated to a Genova museum.
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Gravestone of Edoardo Chiossone
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Grave of Joseph Heco who was born Japanese (as Hamada Hikozo) but naturalized as a US citizen.
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Grave of Joseph Heco
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Grave of the family of Robert Walker Irwin (1844-1925), Hawaiian Minister to Japan.
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Graves of Robert Walker Irwin (rear, on the right) and his family.
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Grave of Robert Walker Irwin (1844-1925), Hawaiian Minister to Japan who managed the Japanese immigration to Hawaii in the 19th century. Aoyama Cemetery, Tokyo
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Grave of Robert Walker Irwin buried together with wife Iki. More about Robert Walker Irwin here.
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Grave of loyal dog Hachiko and his master, Professor Ueno.
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Grave of Yoshida Shigeru, Japan's first postwar prime minister.
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Grave of Yoshida Shigeru 吉田茂の墓
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An unkept grave.
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